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Comments needed on my workshop plans...

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Digizz

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http://www.siliconpixel.com/workshop/workshoplayout.pdf

This plan (v1) shows rough location of the main bits of proposed kit in my yet-to-be-built workshop. It also shows location of power points etc.

Could I please ask for some feedback - Any and all comments would be most welcome - especially if you think something is positioned in an odd location or won't work in practise.

Most of the kit can be repositioned over time but positioning of power outlets is obviously more difficult and best to get right from the start.

Dimensions are 4m x 4m and most of the kit is to scale (apart for the bits I've had to guess).

Many thanks :)

Paul.
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Paul

I am just finishing the panelling and electrics on my single garage conversion and I have put in twenty double points. I know that I will only ever use two or three at a time but there is nothing worse than not having a socket or enough sockets in the right position.

Having said all of that I would suggest that you put in more sockets as they are only a few pounds each.

Cheers
Neil
 
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Anonymous

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. I know that I will only ever use two or three at a time
Neil, you maybe only using those at any one time but you want all your other stuff plugged in ready for use.

In my shop, I have 3 used on trickle chargers, two for dust extraction and one for dehumidifier. I haven't picked up a tool yet :lol:

Plugged in but switched off are my table saw, thicknesser, mitre saw, router table, and band saw.

Ive got 16 outlets and could use another 8 easily.

Planning new stuff, make sure all your outlets are switched individually
 

Digizz

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Yes - good point. And I've already got a load spare from re-wiring the house anyway :)

Just need to make sure there's some wall space left!

I'm thinking about fitting them waist height all around as well.
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Paul

Digizz":1bk2mc9y said:
I'm thinking about fitting them waist height all around as well.
I fitted the majority of mine at waist/dado height (sorry, I shouldn't have used that word) with the rest almost at ground level for the tablesaw and P/T etc.

Cheers
Neil
 

Digizz

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Anyone running cables for table saw etc from the ceiling or up through floor panels? i.e. to lessen risk of tripping.
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Paul

Digizz":2dy0nce0 said:
Anyone running cables for table saw etc from the ceiling or up through floor panels? i.e. to lessen risk of tripping.
I am purposely not going to do that as I feel it will just introduce another obstacle for things to get caught on.

The wiring will be covered and will sit between the ply sheeting on the floor.

Cheers
Neil
 

Digizz

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So you'll permanently (or semi-permanently) run it to under the machine?
 

Alf

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Paul,

More sockets definitely; I wouldn't like to say how many we have, but there's still never one in the right place :oops: We put them at a 4 foot height IIRC, and they're all run on surface mounted conduit so there's absolutely no risk of drill through one. Not everyone's choice, but works for us. That height brings the tool cables nicely clear of bench tops and there's less chance of stuff being piled up in front of them on the bench, although I have managed it :oops: You might also consider one or two RCD type double sockets, particulary near the door if you're likely to use it for plugging in gardening tools. The beauty of these is you don't have to remember to put an RCD in, it's just always there. Not cheap though. :(

One other thing that occurs to me; with that lovely double door I'd be tempted to put either the P/T or T/S so that they can take advantage of all that out/in feed space if required. I might also consider putting the bench in front of the window, but I'm not totally sure about that.

Looks good. And big too; lucky fellow. :D

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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I'd go with alf on the height of points.

Its what I have in my shop and works well for me.

BTW, smashing size workshop.

Happy times ahead :)
 

Digizz

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Thanks Guys,

I've already added in extra sockets :)

Surface trunking is an interesting point - easier to fit than cutting out all those holes in whatever finish I finally go for (probably Ply) + You can always easily add extra sockets in the future.

Don't think it quite works with the 16A sockets though - anyone seen a 16A socket for trunking mounting? Could just run a trunking spur down to the surface mount 16A socket lower down the wall.

Have to give that one some thought - although I've never been a huge fan of surface trunking - often looks a bit too bulky.

RCD - I'm planning on protecting both the 13A and 16A ring mains with an RCD mounted in the workshop consumer unit. Need to check up on that though as the feed to the workshop will also be RCD protected at the main house consumer unit. Someone once told me you shouldn't fit two RCD's in line - although I'm not sure I believe that - isn't it a case of the second having a lower rating (30mA rather than the 100mA?) - Anyone know about this???
 

paisawood

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Hello,

Don't think that there is any problem with installing two rcd's in series other than the fact that a fault in the workshop will trip the power in the house as well as workshop. Probably best avoided, but not the end of the world if you have no choice. Best option would be to feed the workshop from an mcb on the direct (no rcd) side of the house consumer unit and then use a split unit in the workshop so that if you have an earth fault on one of your machines then the lights will remain on! Also worth getting c-type mcb's for the IP44 outlets to reduce likelyhood of trips when starting induction motor driven machines.

On general layout, suggest you think about moving bench to window (natural light makes working much more pleasant) and then locate saw and p/t to get maximum possible cutting/planing length without having to move machines around. Being able to pass timber or boards through the door to get a cutting length of 8 ft or more would be a plus point.

Good luck

David
 
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