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Jones

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You can buy a door as in the photo. If it's on a shower room particularly a wet room moisture is the problem , less so temperature. Good timber selection with regards to grain and growth ring orientation for the frame , ledges and braces will reduce any twist or bow. Use narrow boards for the t&g and any cupping will be reduced. If it's hanging and there's no reference to a frame then a bit of twist won't show or affect the operation.
 

thetyreman

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Insulating the garage is definitely a priority now for me, thinking of using kingspan.
 

Inspector

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Unfortunately it's one of those things we are up against and another factor to think about whilst we're measuring up and quoting with our job. I think it's unrealistic to have the idea of working in a heated workshop with a similar temperature to the clients home. That up keep is unrealistic and would be a higher running cost. My thoughts would be to make and finish the door and to take the door into the clients home with sheet material clamped to both faces of the door. I would leave it stood upright for a few days to allow it to slowly climb to temperature. The sheet material should prevent or slow down any rapid moisture change and would emulate it being stacked?

That's just an idea, I've never tried it myself.

If you make a sandwich how is anything except the door edges going to acclimate? The sheets are going to keep the door from getting moisture in or out so when released the process you delayed will start and your hooped anyway. It is the moisture that is important, not the temperature. Air hold less moisture when cold. I can watch ice dry up and disappear here when it is subzero.

Pete
 

Adam W.

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Well, if you want a guarantee that it won't bow or twist, you need timber which is cut parallel to the bark from a stem which shows no spiral grain.

You won't get that unless you mill it yourself, as it's far too expensive for a mill to produce.

Or just make it out of MDF and veneer it with constructional veneer.
 

Sachakins

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The bow is the most likely outcome. Just because it's not constrained doesn't negate the impending issues.
Fit and fingers crossed could be an expensive error.
 

D_W

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You won't get that unless you mill it yourself, as it's far too expensive for a mill to produce.

Wood like this is milled in the US, but it's not sold for $4 a board foot FAS at a trim shop. It's sold at marine or instrument supply places (not like retail marine, but marine lumber supply for boat builders).

And would make for an expensive door.

It is possible to get wood as straight and as stable that's flatsawn, but would literally take time that nobody wants to spend (hanging wood and checking it through seasonal changes, just as one would do with a guitar neck).
 

blackteaonesugar

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ledges and braces will reduce any twist or bow. Use narrow boards for the t&g and any cupping will be reduced. If it's hanging and there's no reference to a frame then a bit of twist won't show or affect the operation.

This is my thinking in the most.

It's a difficult thing and it's why I normally shy away from doors if I can as you so often have to revisit them.
In this scenario though, where it's not fitting in a frame, I feel like the worry of that is maybe slightly reduced.
Although, not that much clearly as I posted a thread on it here! 😂
 

JDW

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If it's constructed like the door above I can't see the whole door bowing much, if at all, because it's made of several planks going in different directions. However, this doesn't mean there won't be some warping somewhere in the construction when the timbers shrink as they dry out in the house when it's fitted.

Could you make a basic temporary door to hang for them until spring (using mrmdf)?

If this isn't acceptable I would say thank you but I can't help you with this job - but I can recommend someone who can (if you can).

I would steer away from getting waivers signed - put yourself in the customer's shoes, would you sign something to say that if what you've spent your money on fails you can't complain?

Why potentially damage your reputation for one door?
 

Mark Karacsonyi

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Some great input. I wish this post was available a few years ago. Would have saved me some headaches and a small fortune.
 
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blackteaonesugar

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Tis done!
I made it and have had it sat in my lounge for a couple of weeks just to try to prevent any nasty surprises when it goes into the clients home.
So far no issues 🙏

PXL_20220112_121625582-01.jpeg

PXL_20220112_121703177-01.jpeg
 
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