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phil p

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Hi,

Just noticed my tools are starting to look a little shabby, not too bad but could do wipe over with something just to get off grubby finger marks etc.

Any ideas on the best thing to use, mainly for cleaning the plastic casings?

Any specific cleaning agents like WD40 or similar?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 

MARK.B.

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Wipe over with a damp rag and a little fairy liquid(other brands available :LOL:) gentle use of a green scouring pad to help with stubborn stuff, be wary of solvents reacting with the plastic cases on your tools:eek:
 

Orraloon

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I take it you are talking about the plastic bodies of power tools. For plastic I would use a cloth dampened with water and dish washing up liquid. Car wash would also do. Avoid dripping wet as you dont want water in the electrics. Solvents tend to degrade plastic. For metal tools then WD40 can be used to get off grease and rust with a scrubbing pad if required. Then wipe off. After that a wipe down with 3 in 1 or a wax paste.
Regards
John
 

phil p

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Thanks for the info guys.

Thats my weekend sorted!
 

Distinterior

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Denatured Alcohol is what I use.....It doesn't damage the plastic or any rubber parts and cuts through most grime.

Its handy to have a bottle anyway as its uses are extensive. ....Dont leave the lid off the bottle for long periods of time though as it will evaporate away in a very short time.
 

recipio

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I use Ney Panel Wipe. Its great for removing grime and has a lovely citrus smell. Being alcohol based it evaporates in seconds.
 

Tezza1

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Denatured Alcohol is what I use.....It doesn't damage the plastic or any rubber parts and cuts through most grime.

Its handy to have a bottle anyway as its uses are extensive. ....Dont leave the lid off the bottle for long periods of time though as it will evaporate away in a very short time.
Hi There, I have several power saw blades together with a large number of router cutters which have a build up of resin. Would denatured alcohol remove this build up or can you recommend another cleaner.

Thanks in advance.
 

Distinterior

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Hi There, I have several power saw blades together with a large number of router cutters which have a build up of resin. Would denatured alcohol remove this build up or can you recommend another cleaner.

Thanks in advance.
There are proprietary cleaners specifically made and sold for cleaning cutting tools, but DNA would do what you ask, it would likely take longer though.
 

Fergie 307

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For the tools, don't put it on anything plastic as it may start melting it. Very good for removing the varnish like deposit on cutting tools.
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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I wonder if anyone has tried an ultrasonic cleaner to remove layers of grime or imbedded grit? Yes, it uses water (with a touch of alcohol), which could create a climate for rust, but a hair dryer or hot air gun would dry it effectively. A light coating of oil would protect the surface.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

mrpercysnodgrass

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Hi There, I have several power saw blades together with a large number of router cutters which have a build up of resin. Would denatured alcohol remove this build up or can you recommend another cleaner.

For saw blades and router cutters I use bicarbonate of soda in boiling water. Make up a solution with boiling water, dunk your blades in for a minute and scrub using a nailbrush, they will come up like new.
 

Fergie 307

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I wonder if anyone has tried an ultrasonic cleaner to remove layers of grime or imbedded grit? Yes, it uses water (with a touch of alcohol), which could create a climate for rust, but a hair dryer or hot air gun would dry it effectively. A light coating of oil would protect the surface.

Regards from Perth

Derek
For cleaning watch parts I simply put them in the little jam jars you get at hotels. Fill the jar with your choice of cleaning fluid and then pop them in the water bath, so the water comes up to roughly the level of the fluid in the jar. You can use any jar as long as it has a tight fitting lid. So no need to use water in contact with the parts you are cleaning. Good tip is to get yourself some stainless mesh and make a disc to fit in the bottom of the jar. That way the dirt falls to the bottom and the clean parts sit on top of the mesh. You can also buy various sized mesh balls to put the parts in. For watch parts I use Coleman fuel as an initial cleaner to dissolve old oil and grease, it's basically just highly refined petrol. Leave them to soak in in overnight, then 15 minutes in the ultrasound cleaner at 30 degrees. Then blow them dry on a ceramic plate and repeat the ultrasound process but this time using pure alcohol, leaves everything nice and clean and shiny. If anyone is contemplating doing this with a watch then DO NOT put either the balance or pallet fork through this process. On many watches, even modern ones, the jewels on these parts are secured with shellac which will dissolve, causing the jewels to fall off, a major league PITA. Obviously won't remove rust, for that use either phosphoric acid, or citric acid. Citric is best of the parts have a finish like chrome, as phosphoric tends to lift the edges of any remaining plate, and turns the metal grey, although this can be polished off. Citric leaves a cleaner appearance and doesn't attack plating on the surface so much, but takes longer to act on the rust. So good for fine stuff, but for tools I would use phosphoric. I sometimes use a weak citric solution to brighten up tarnished brass parts of watches, or to remove light surface rust from gunmetal pocket watch cases. A decent ultrasound cleaner can be one of the best things you ever bought If you do this sort of stuff regularly.
 

Fergie 307

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Hi,

Just noticed my tools are starting to look a little shabby, not too bad but could do wipe over with something just to get off grubby finger marks etc.

Any ideas on the best thing to use, mainly for cleaning the plastic casings?

Any specific cleaning agents like WD40 or similar?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
Armorall, or similar sold for car dashboards is very good, and will also freshen up the colour. If you use something like pre paint wipe or alcohol it tends to dry out the plastic and over time will make it become brittle.
 

Richie555

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I will be concentrating on the metalwork. For large areas on a table saw or band saw I you Machine wax after cleaning with wire wool. For hand tools such as Planes, chisels etc I clean all the surfaces of saw dust then use wire wool to remove any stains or resin. Then I apply tool wax and store them in sealed plastic containers with a dehumidifier in. For moving parts I use WD40 dry spray and 3 in 1 oil in Rack and pinion mechanisms on my Drill press and Bench vise screw. These things I do ready for Winter.
 
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