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MattMoore

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Hi all,
just a quick questions about chisels, the marples chiselsi currently use are useless, to the extent where the edge has gone dull within a few light hits with the hammer, im pretty sure it isnt my sharpening technique, as a couple of old chisels i have, their edges seem to keep going and going.
now as im on site most days and very rarely in the workshop, i really want a set of chisels who's edges will last well, and also ones that come fairly flat. the marples took what seems like forever to get flat.
alot of the time the chisels will be used with a hammer, so the handles will need to be upto that.
any ideas of a brand of chisel that will be everything im after?
cheers
Matt
 

Alf

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I'll be interested on the answers to this myself. StewieH's disappointment got me wondering what I'd suggest instead, and I realised I hadn't a clue. Are those Bacho ones any good?

Cheers, Alf
 

MikeW

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Alf":2jveuo2z said:
I'll be interested on the answers to this myself. StewieH's disappointment got me wondering what I'd suggest instead, and I realised I hadn't a clue. Are those Bacho ones any good?
Cheers, Alf
The best carpenter's chisels out there that I can find are the Stanley #60 with the Stanloid handles capped with a steel button. Tough and the handles can handle a framing hammer. It is possible, in the states anyway, to find some of these Sheffield-made chisels sitting on shelves in obscure stores.

I have some '60s and '70s vintage Sandvik/Bahco and they are pretty darn good chisels, though not as tough.

I also have some NOS Bahco I bought from ePay for worksite chisels. I think they are late '80s/early '90s vintage. Definitely not of the same quality as the older ones if ground at the same angle. I reground them to 30* with a few degree secondary bevel and they have held up pretty good.
 

Frank D.

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My favorite commercially made chisel is a Marples Ridgeway, about 20 years old; it shouldn't be too difficult for you to find in the UK (used). It (I only have one) has a slight tendency to chip once in a while, but the edge lasts a long, long time. I don't have that many chisels, mind you, but it does hold its edge considerably better than my Sandviks with the plastic handles and my Pfeils. I've been looking for more of them but haven't managed to find any yet.
 

engineer one

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my personal experience in terms of recent use by heavy handed people leads me to the no longer made dutch brand nooitgedagt. swedish steel,
easy to flatten and sharpen, and a friend of mine has used some i sharpened in July until now without a touch up.

mine were found at a discount store since the dutch firm was bought out by american tool and the manufacture there discontinued. seems to be happening too much.

i have a set of the latest plastic handled, but most expensive bahco,
not sure about belting them with a hammer though. the edge is sharp
but so far i have not used them in a site basis everyday and all day so cant say.

i think as every one has suggested unless you buy new sorby or such like, then you have to hunt older stuff since it lasts longer. the other thing is once you have sorted an edge to carry a stone for on site honing.

seems that as usual the accountants have gotten to the chisels too.

interesting thought many of those products made in china and india are hand finished which means they are not consistent and may differ from the inscribed sizes since they are not checked so well.
final two thoughts
japanese stuff, even the cheaper ones sold by axminster etc seem to keep and edge and be designed for belting, otherwise you have to pay mega bucks for LN.

who knows whether this helps
paul :lol:
 

MattMoore

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well i always do carry a diamond stone on site with me, but for one reason or another, the backs always seem to move from sharpening to sharpening,
so imfinding my self having to flatten the back for 5-10 mins or so, and then as soon as i have installed 2 doors or so, the edge has gone and is in need of sharpening again.
i have looked at sorby's but in light of a recent thread im not too sure on them anymore,
i think old is the way to go, but finding a decent set with metal hoops on the ends of the handles seems harder than finding hens teeth,
well the places i have looked anyway

Cheers all
 
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Japanese chisels are the best bet if you want to beat them to death with a hammer.

They'll just laugh at your puny efforts with the hammer as their edge glints in the sunlight
 

Chris Knight

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Tony":14bb1fsn said:
Japanese chisels are the best bet if you want to beat them to death with a hammer.

They'll just laugh at your puny efforts with the hammer as their edge glints in the sunlight
Tony,

I have to disagree. Perhaps it's true for some Japanese chisels but for many, all that is going to be glinting are the fractured edges of the blade. They are typically a good deal harder than western chisels and the edges will crumble when hammering them in hardwood, especially if any leverage is applied to loosen chips.

They were designed originally primarily for use in softwood and in my experience, that is where they are best applied. I know there are some Japanese chisels that are made for the western markets that are in HSS and these are probably OK being hammered.

Generally, I see no need for hoops on the handles of chisels. Handles are easily replaced and if made of a decent bit of wood, they can be walloped for years with a mallet before this is necessary anyway.
 

Alf

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waterhead37":2eqc83r9 said:
...especially if any leverage is applied...
That would seem to me the biggest disadvantage to them for site use; what would you open the paint cans with instead? :-k :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

Chris Knight

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Alf":t9tq4hv4 said:
That would seem to me the biggest disadvantage to them for site use; what would you open the paint cans with instead? :-k :wink:

Cheers, Alf
Dunno, plane iron? - but loved it when Tage Frid did this when tool freaks got him annoyed!
 

Philly

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Chris
Maybe I've been lucky, but my Jap chisels hold up really well when being hammered into hardwoods.
Just goes to show-buying chisels is a minefield :roll:
Philly :D
 
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Chris

As you say, designed originally for softwwod.

However, like Philly's mine are used mainly oak and ash and I beat the hell out of them without chipping. (I would not dream of striking my AIs with such force :shock: )

They were a cheap set from Dieter Schmidt and hold their edge for absolutely ages even with this harsh treatment

I stand by my post (as far as my japanese chisels go anyway)
 

Alf

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Well I must admit, I've not noticed any trouble with mine in hardwoods either. But to be fair, I haven't used them much.

Cheers, Alf
 

Philly

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Chris
Some of mine were from Tilgear, the rest (including dovetail and parers) from Axminster. As you already know, any levering results in a cracking (yes, pun intended) chip, along with much cursing! :lol: Got a nice 2 inch one which is great for defining shoulders, etc.
They are pretty reasonably priced (especially compared to L-N's and Victors :wink: ) and really the only chisels I could recommend. Well, along with a couple of Marples for opening paint tins, etc :lol:
Cheers
Philly :D
 

trevtheturner

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I often read references to hammering chisels. Is this just a commonly used general term or do some people actually strike chisel handles with a hammer?

I have always understood that the correct tool to use for striking chisel handles is a wooden mallet and that, if the chisel is sharp, this is sufficient. My practice is always to use said mallet. Works for me and I cannot recall having taken an 'ammer to a chisel.

(Advantages of using a mallet: it's got a big 'ead so you don't often miss, and it won't damage the chisel handles).

Just wondering what others do?

Cheers,

Trev.
 

Johnboy

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I always use a "dead blow" mallet for striking chisels. Doesn't damage the chisel and no rebound.

John
 

MikeW

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For myself, I strike them with something handy :lol:

Sometimes it is a wood mallet. Sometimes it is a carver's (round) mallet, either a coated one or a wood one. Sometimes it is one of two brass hammers.

And sometimes it's a scrap of wood.

Mostly I never strike a chisel, rather choosing to pare with one instead.

Unless I'm playing carpenter and using my Stanley #60s. Then it's a framing and or a finish hammer...

Somehow I'm not certain this helps :roll:

Mike
 

Alf

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I've always believed the rule of thumb was:
Handles with metal hoops - hit 'em wiv' an 'ammer if you like
Bench chisels/firmers/butt etc - mallet, round or square as preferred
Paring chisels - thou shalt not hit them on pain of pain
Plastic handled site chisels - do what you jolly well like 'cos nothing's gonna make 'em worse. :wink:

As I understand it, it always used to be, at least in the UK, "thou shalt not use a hammer on chisels - period". But the poly-placy-tacky-urethene handles made a feature of the fact you could, thus confusing everyone. And then the Japanese habit of using a hammer on everything upset it all too. Personally I stick rigidly with only using a mallet, mainly 'cos I so rarely have a hammer to hand anyway. For some reason I can't get on with the dead blow at all, despite repeated tries.

Cheers, Alf
 

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