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GEPPETTO

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Hi All,

who understand me (naturally who has read my posts :lol: ), knows that I prefer hand tools and every some time I ask to the forum some questions.
Well, this morning I wish to ask which types of chisels a woodworker must to have in his tool chest. I tell you that I have a set of chisels with bevel edges from 6mm to 24mm.
Are they sufficient?

If it isn't too much, I'd wish to know which type( if it is possible to have pictures :roll: ) for what thing is useful.

Many thanks in advance.
 

ydb1md

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Not to skirt your question, but it really depends on what you're doing or what you want to do. Your bevel edge chisels will do 85% to 90% of your wood shop duties. If you're into chopping your own mortises, you definitely need dedicated mortising chisels.

Are your chisels of good quality? You'd be surprised the difference that quality steel makes. Good chisels will hold an edge much longer and the parings they can produce are superb. Garden variety Stanleys don't hold an edge worth anything. My current chisels are manufactured by MHG, Hartville Tool carries them, but I have been lusting after a set of American Pattern chisels by Ashley Iles. My MHG's are nice, but they're a little long for my tastes and they don't have the nice contours of the Ashley Iles handles. Maybe for Christmas? :)
 

Midnight

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Gabriele...

I'll try to keep this simple by avoiding carving tools...

there's 3 basic types;-

Paring chisels
Generally these aren't intended to be struck with a hammer / mallet etc; their purpose is to take a delicate cut for final trimming of a joint using hand pressure only...
http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp? ... 21&recno=1

Bench chisels
Your bevel edge chisels will fall into this group; generally crude, rough and tough tools, built to be pounded day in-day out and come back for more... The struck end of the handle should be reinforced to enable it to be struck without splitting the handle, the traditional method is to add a ferrule to the end of the handle...
http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp? ... 18&recno=2

Mortise chisels
These are the toughest kids on the block, designed to survive being pounded hard and deep to dig out a mortice. Their sides should be square to the back for registration in the joint, the ends of the handles should be reinforced similar to bench chisels, and there should be a leather washerbetween the handle and the shoulder of the chisel to act as a shock absorber.
http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp? ... 94&recno=1

The exception to this is if the chisel mates with the handle using a socket design rather than having a tang inserted into the handle.
http://www.lie-nielsen.com/tool.html?id=mc_set

Note that this is a general guide only, there's loads of variations on each theme. The tricky part is finding a set or sets that feel right in your hand while being capable of doing the job... more often than not, good designs are let down through the use of poor quality steel / chisels with good steel are let down through having pitifull handles etc...

I wish you well finding sets that suit your needs...
 

devonwoody

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YDB1 of Maryland


I have a quarter inch Stanley full bevel chisel that beats my expensive German chisel for sharpness and holding its edge.

30 years old mind you.

Nice place Maryland, how's the bridge getting on these days, growing old?
 
A

Anonymous

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Gabriele

I agree with the above mentioned points and Midnight's links should tell you all you need to know

I use a set of 8 Ashley Ilses bevel chisels for 90% of my wook and they rarley need sharpening - very good edge holding. Very good quality chisels at a surprisingly reasonable price

When want to really chop out large pieces with good hard whacks form the mallet, I use my cheap japanese chisels which stand up this treatment very well.
 

Alf

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Gabriele, as others have said the bevel edged chisels you already have should deal with most things. If you do a lot of mortising, it might pay you to have a proper mortise chisel or two and a paring chisel if you find you need to pare and trim a lot of stuff that your existing chisels can't reach. Other than that, as you make more and more things, you'll find yourself learning which chisels you need next to make your life a little easier or the work go a little quicker and you'll be able to answer the question much better yourself. :D

Cheers, Alf
 

ydb1md

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Devon:

To be sure, the old stanley tools are quality. I don't even consider the "old" Stanley and the "new" Stanley to be the same company. I'm sure that your old chisel (an everlast?) is awesome. Does Stanley own Buck Brothers? Their tools seem to be of about the same quality.

Maryland is good. Thank god I don't have to cross any of the "bridges" in Md to go to work. The wilson bridge project is a mess and the legion bridge is always crazy. I get to ride the metro. A longer trip to be sure, but much less stress.

cheers,
Dave
 

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