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jonesbones

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I am looking to buy a Tormek chisel sharpener or a Robert Sorby pro edge If someone as used both would appreciate there views jonesbones
 

Jacob

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Pro-edge is good but requires a careful touch - it doesn't do it for you like a pencil sharpener, you still need hand and eye skills. e.g. you tell where the blade is touching by the spark trail below. The finer grits can overheat the edge if you don't do it gently.
But it's very quick, easy to set up, adjust, and change belts.
 

Sean Hellman

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I have both, the Tormek is being using very rarely these days. I much prefer the Pro edge, but you have to watch the over heating, quick easy belt changing and cheaper to run
 

Jacob

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I'd add - the proedge is solid and nice and simply made.
Long tools like turning gouges are easy thanks to be able to tilt the whole thing back. If you wanted better control you could easily make up your own version of the Wolverine jig (below). A board with stops (notches?) or a moving stop.

 

wcndave

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Have you looked at the worksharp, there are two models at rutlands and for repeated angle sharpening they are very quick and easy to use. Also you avoid the concave grind. I find them vey good.
 

woodpig

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I doubt you'll want to use anything else once you've used it a while. :wink:
 

paulm

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Agreed, just sold my tormek and waterstones after finding I didn't use them since I bought the proedge and fine diamond stones and 3M papers. Don't even need the diamond stones really to be honest, bit of an impulse buy !

Cheers, Paul
 

Jacob

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Proedge is also very good for carving gouges. You can freehand those very acute angle with a very fine grit and nice flat bevels. But you have to be very careful not to overheat.
There was a Lidl carving chisel thread a bit back. I reckon for a beginner the Sorby proedge plus any cheapo chisels would be a good combination, in that you could get your hand in with shaping and sharpening (and carving) without worrying about spoiling some expensive tools.
 
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