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Chisel gets dull whilst working up through the grits

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Argus

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Second half..... can't see Leicester winning this one.
Sorry to all the Leicester fans....... I'm now eating humble pie, Chomp! Chomp! Chomp! :oops::oops:
Brilliant save from Kaspar!

May all your edges be sharp....... now, where were we?

Ah Yes, sharpening...

Carry on, London!
 

sometimewoodworker

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I've never ever said anything about “THE CORRECT WAY” it's not what I think. What I have said is the easiest, quickest and cheapest way. That's all really. Don't know why it's a problem.
I agree You didn’t say it’s the “THE CORRECT WAY” but your phrasing did.

It is absolutely not the easiest way for many many people, and for them neither is it the quickest or cheapest.

If I want sharp I don’t spend time trying to learn a new skill each year that’s neither easy or fast. I use my veritas jig, it gets my tools the exact angle each time I use it, it doesn’t mess up the shape of the edge or the stones, that probably cost more than most chisels.
So FOR ME it’s the easiest, fastest, and because I have it the cheapest.

I don’t say people should buy Shapton single grit stones Japanese chisels or a veritas guide but I was in Japan and could.

For occasional use get a piece of plate glass or granite off cut a few sheets of wet and dry and a record wheel jig.

If you sharpen often then that’s a completely different story but don’t imagine that your skill that you constantly practice works for everyone
 

D_W

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don't worry - jacob has never shown a picture of a particularly crisp edge, so it's not like he's sitting on some big secret.
 

sometimewoodworker

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don't worry - jacob has never shown a picture of a particularly crisp edge, so it's not like he's sitting on some big secret.
He probably gets as close to what he wants in the time he’s prepared to spend.

I get the same without the investment of time which I can guarantee is overall at least an order of magnitude less than he has had to put in over the years.

Who gets the better edge doesn’t really matter I’m virtually certain that my edge is far smoother, but again it doesn’t matter.

What is important is getting an edge that is good enough for the work you do and lasts a reasonable time.

Anyway enough massaging of egos and hammering on an ossified viewpoint.
 

Keith 66

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I have never understood what the problem is with sharpening, First you need good tools with good steel, probably why most of my go to ones are over a hundred years old. Ordinary grey oil stone, i have collected about 7 over the years, I dont like red arkansas ones as i never seem to be able to get anything sharp on them. I have two grey stones that are excellent, they are soft & wear easily & one just had to be flattened on a belt linisher.
The way my dad taught me to sharpen was grind the concave 30 degree bevel then on the oilstone, WD40 or parafin as lube. Hold the chisel or iron so both ends of the concave bevel are sitting on the stone, rock it a bit to feel this. Lift back end a bit & work it back & forth a few times. flip it over & a couple of flat rubs on the bottom. I tend to strop a couple of times on the palm of my hand a trick i learnt from Sam the technician at Falmouth Technical college back in 79, he had worked in Falmouth dockyard as a young man, He used to strop 20" planer knives this way & also had three fingers missing, (But that was a bandsaw accident!)
When i ended up as a D&T technician in a school i used to strop chisels on my hand & the kids were always impressed!
Its like riding a bike once you get it you never forget.
 

Jacob

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........ but don’t imagine that your skill that you constantly practice works for everyone
Actually I do think it would work for anyone but they have been talked out of it!
It's not highly skilled at all - it's basic and simple. As Keith 66 says above, a bit like riding a bike. Quite impossible until you suddenly get it after an hour or so
But don't worry about it do it your own way - just be aware that there is an alternative! Even if you lost all your kit and had no stone at all you would be able to sharpen quite well by looking around for a bit of slate, or marble, or anything
 
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Daniel2

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Actually I do think it would work for anyone but they have been talked out of it!
It's not highly skilled at all - it's basic and simple.
But don't worry about it do it your own way - just be aware that there is an alternative!
You're starting to sound like Paul Sellers !!
 

Chippysu

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I have already tried the latter.

Tbh I have always looked at the leather strops as being a bit unnecessary, like.. who needs it THAT sharp? I should get one and find out for myself though I suppose.
Get one of your old wide leather belts, chop out the middle piece to use, attach it, unfinished side out, around a piece of 2x1, job done. Made mine from my hubby's belt back in college and still using it to this day. The sharper the tool the easier and safer to use. As for sharpening, I was the same, it's just practice. 😊 Over time I developed my own technique, preference on bevels and angles of bevels for certain jobs. I inherited my grandad's & dad's chisels. The old steel takes an unbelievable edge but I need to hone/strop more often, the edge on my own newer chisels, (just over 30 years old,) keep the edge longer but never as sharp as my old ones. Carbon content makes a difference. Buy an old one from a junk shop & try it. You'll get there, it's just practice, trial & error. I've ended up with some wonderfully weird shapes & angles over the years, the penny will suddenly drop. 😊😊
 

Jacob

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Get one of your old wide leather belts, chop out the middle piece to use, attach it, unfinished side out, around a piece of 2x1, job done. Made mine from my hubby's belt back in college and still using it to this day. The sharper the tool the easier and safer to use. As for sharpening, I was the same, it's just practice. 😊 Over time I developed my own technique, preference on bevels and angles of bevels for certain jobs. I inherited my grandad's & dad's chisels. The old steel takes an unbelievable edge but I need to hone/strop more often, the edge on my own newer chisels, (just over 30 years old,) keep the edge longer but never as sharp as my old ones. Carbon content makes a difference. Buy an old one from a junk shop & try it. You'll get there, it's just practice, trial & error. I've ended up with some wonderfully weird shapes & angles over the years, the penny will suddenly drop. 😊😊
Mines a bit of handbag leather. I cut it from a bigger piece which I kept in case this one wears out. Still got it, 50 years on!
 

Blaidd-Drwg

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Trying to flatten my oil stones can be interesting. All my oil stones are pre-owned and had channels and valleys and cups worn into them and I spent more hours than I care to think about flattening them. It is worth it in the end though because I especially like the oil stones for my adzes, axes, and drawknives. I always use my waterstones for chisels, plane blades, and similar. Right now I'm trying to figure out if I need a diamond plate to lap my waterstones. I've gotten this far without one (I've used a ceramic bathroom tile for ages) but I hear good things about some of them. Trying to justify the price though.
 

Jacob

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Trying to flatten my oil stones can be interesting. All my oil stones are pre-owned and had channels and valleys and cups worn into them and I spent more hours than I care to think about flattening them. It is worth it in the end though because I especially like the oil stones for my adzes, axes, and drawknives. I always use my waterstones for chisels, plane blades, and similar. Right now I'm trying to figure out if I need a diamond plate to lap my waterstones. I've gotten this far without one (I've used a ceramic bathroom tile for ages) but I hear good things about some of them. Trying to justify the price though.
Best thing with oilstones is to not flatten them. Flattening and lapping are two notions which came over strong with modern sharpening. Instead, as you work just spread the load as evenly as you can.
Do have to freshen them up a bit - keep them well oiled and do a quick scrub over with a coarser bit of stone. I use a 3m diapad (which I happened to have - not bought for the purpose) and they are pricy but good value. Slightly bendy so no prob with a less than flat stone. This one's been going for years.
 

D_W

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Trying to flatten my oil stones can be interesting. All my oil stones are pre-owned and had channels and valleys and cups worn into them and I spent more hours than I care to think about flattening them. It is worth it in the end though because I especially like the oil stones for my adzes, axes, and drawknives. I always use my waterstones for chisels, plane blades, and similar. Right now I'm trying to figure out if I need a diamond plate to lap my waterstones. I've gotten this far without one (I've used a ceramic bathroom tile for ages) but I hear good things about some of them. Trying to justify the price though.
Atoma 400 , find the cheapest price on Amazon , etc. Should be about 60 bucks. Stay away from trend, etc.

If you want to flatten oilstones, diagonal lines made in an x pattern on a cheap stationary belt sander will do it, then lap to finish. The x pattern is done on the idler and not the open belt. (That's for natural stones. No great reason to flatten india and crystolon stones)
 

Phil Pascoe

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Get one of your old wide leather belts, chop out the middle piece to use, attach it, unfinished side out, around a piece of 2x1, job done. Made mine from my hubby's belt back in college and still using it to this day.
Was that what you were thinking about when you got his trousers off? :LOL:
 
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