Quantcast

Chipped edges on new planes and do new planes need sharpening before use?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

AJB Temple

Finely figured
UKW Supporter
Joined
13 Oct 2015
Messages
3,219
Reaction score
425
Location
Tunbridge Wells
There's a lot missing from how this case is usually reported -

Of course, there are plenty of utterly frivolous lawsuits filed all the time in both countries, but they're not all as clear-cut as they look. Remember also that large American corporations hold a lot of influence over mass media and public discourse, and an obvious interest in reforming tort law so that they're never held liable for anything they do.
Yes, I am aware of the detail of both cases. I originally trained as a lawyer but I have no respect at all for the ambulance chasing end of the profession. The fact is that consumers are frequently stupid. In some cases they are stupid and greedy. These people attract greedy lawyers and chancers. It is generally accepted that the correct temperature to brew coffee is 85 degrees C and for tea near boiling. We all know that hot drinks are hot and as a result we have to be careful.

In the US case, my recollection is she was originally seeking $20k to cover current and future medical bills. Mc Donald's offered less and then got into a war. Even that claim was frivolous: the woman knowingly bought a hot coffee and she was careless and reckless in how she then handled it. Her case would certainly have failed in England and Europe. Rightly so.
 

Andy Kev.

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
20 Aug 2013
Messages
1,280
Reaction score
59
Location
Germany
The fact is that consumers are frequently stupid. In some cases they are stupid and greedy. These people attract greedy lawyers and chancers.
I think we tend to lose sight of the unfortunate fact that we are all capable of bouts of great stupidity. The coffee case might have had some merit had it been possible to show that e.g. a weak paper cup or a poorly fitting lid led to the accident but otherwise we can make a cultural assumption that everybody knows how to deal with a hot drink and if they don't, then frankly they shouldn't be buying them.

One of my favourite examples of daftness concerns a friend who wanted to see my workshop. I showed her the set up and various tools. Before I handed her a chisel I said very firmly, "Careful! Sharp!". So what did she do? She decided to test this by pushing one corner of the chisel against the tip of her thumb hard enough to draw a tiny drop of blood and then had the cheek to look at me angrily. In all fairness, she found it difficult to maintain her anger in the face of a host who was desperately and with only partial success, trying to suppress his giggles. And that is an intelligent woman who has a responsible job in the international service department of an engineering firm. She can reverse park a car, though.*

As an aside, I've got nothing against punitive and exemplary damages but in cases where people cannot possibly be recouping personal financial losses and costs e.g. where they're sueing due to the death of a relative, I think the amount they personally receive should have a cap e.g. 10 k and the judge should be required to ask them which charity they would like the other 2, 990, 000 to go to. That way you'd remove the incentive for excessive personal gain while maintaining punitive measures for the negligent/guilty.

*As judge and jury, I set her compensation at a cup of coffee (which stayed unspilt).
 

Paddy Roxburgh

Established Member
Joined
19 Jun 2014
Messages
621
Reaction score
1
Location
Enfield Lock
Eshmiel is a variant of Ishmael, half grandfather (I think, it's been a long time since I did Scripture) of Jacob, by Hagar, Abraham's 'maid servant' (hem hem).

But you knew that.

Oh hang on, maybe great uncle, perhaps once removed. Not very good with lineages.
Hmm, there may be some stylistic similarities but I can't imagine Jacob suggesting tools should be sharp from the box, secondary/tertiary bevels or staning DC. I mean, look at this quote
"None of them are as simple as waving the blade at an oilstone "like I was taught 40 years ago by some old curmudgeon". (My own least favourite variety of sharpening advice)."
That has to be the least Jacob quote of all time.
 

Eshmiel

Established Member
Joined
2 Sep 2020
Messages
69
Reaction score
24
Location
Hebrides
Hmm, there may be some stylistic similarities but I can't imagine Jacob suggesting tools should be sharp from the box, secondary/tertiary bevels or staning DC. I mean, look at this quote
"None of them are as simple as waving the blade at an oilstone "like I was taught 40 years ago by some old curmudgeon". (My own least favourite variety of sharpening advice)."
That has to be the least Jacob quote of all time.
Perhaps that Jacob is another re-incarnation of Jonesy (the black dagger). I notice he has splurged out his silly old tale of curmudgeon-taught sharpening somewhere upthread, as he has done on forums since 1923. There are only those who can sharpen and those who can't, says he. Presumably this means that one must be born with the ability and no amount of learning to do it will enable one to do so, especially if one wants a camber, backbevel or blade that actually cuts the wood without going even blunter every 5 swipes.

Myself I have left here now, despite being unable to resist a peep at this particular thread to see what other machoman talk has been emitted by the various old curmudgeons in training and their sycophants. They will never be as good as the proper old 'uns at being nasty old pippers, though.

So .... I leave you to your talk of. "It's all rubbish except what I, the maker of yet another MDF kitchen and/or wasted-oak Klumpen Stuff say". No need for even MikeG to do his Duchess of Pout flounce! (Again).

Tara, then; and thanks for all the pish. :)

Eshmiel
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
Joined
14 Mar 2013
Messages
3,093
Reaction score
447
Location
Edinburgh
Paddy it may be a false sense of security an' all that. Who knows what goes through a mind as cunning and machiavellian super mind like Jacobs. He might have you in his sights for a much bigger hit later :unsure:
 

Nigel Burden

Established Member
Joined
23 Oct 2018
Messages
352
Reaction score
67
Location
Dorset
Perhaps that Jacob is another re-incarnation of Jonesy (the black dagger). I notice he has splurged out his silly old tale of curmudgeon-taught sharpening somewhere upthread, as he has done on forums since 1923. There are only those who can sharpen and those who can't, says he. Presumably this means that one must be born with the ability and no amount of learning to do it will enable one to do so, especially if one wants a camber, backbevel or blade that actually cuts the wood without going even blunter every 5 swipes.

Myself I have left here now, despite being unable to resist a peep at this particular thread to see what other machoman talk has been emitted by the various old curmudgeons in training and their sycophants. They will never be as good as the proper old 'uns at being nasty old pippers, though.

So .... I leave you to your talk of. "It's all rubbish except what I, the maker of yet another MDF kitchen and/or wasted-oak Klumpen Stuff say". No need for even MikeG to do his Duchess of Pout flounce! (Again).

Tara, then; and thanks for all the pish. :)

Eshmiel
What utter tosh.
 

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
1,917
Reaction score
134
Location
Wiltshire
Has Eshmiel gone, let’s all take a moment to reflect on our loss....

...that should do it, bye!
 

AJB Temple

Finely figured
UKW Supporter
Joined
13 Oct 2015
Messages
3,219
Reaction score
425
Location
Tunbridge Wells
I wondered if Eshmiel was an anagram. Unfortunately the only thing I could think of was that thing you use to move salad about when you have applied a dressing. Then I realised that there is no T in osser.
 

Sgian Dubh

Established Member
Joined
12 Oct 2004
Messages
2,194
Reaction score
73
Location
UK
Has Eshmiel gone, let’s all take a moment to reflect on our loss....
If true I, for one, will miss him, or is it a her: are we still allowed to be so simplistically gender binary in these contemporary times of potential or perceived multiple and fluid gender identities? (No, I don't need an answer).

A blunt, offensive, contrarian, frequently rude, but obviously with woodworking knowledge and experience, a colourful and sometimes semi-courtly and flowery patrician way of expressing him(?)self.

So, what's not to like? It adds a bit of spice to a forum, upsets niceties effectively, and so easily ignorable if you're immune to such things, or you can just be amused by the posts as I am or, if you prefer, you can let yourself get all hot, bothered, and into an outraged froth. Slainte.
 
Last edited:

Andy Kev.

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
20 Aug 2013
Messages
1,280
Reaction score
59
Location
Germany
If true I, for one, will miss him, or is it a her: are we still allowed to be so simplistically gender binary in these contemporary times of potential or perceived multiple and fluid gender identities? (No, I don't need an answer).

A blunt, offensive, contrarian, frequently rude, but obviously with woodworking knowledge and experience, a colourful and sometimes semi-courtly and flowery patrician way of expressing him(?)self.

So, what's not to like? It all adds a bit of spice to a forum, upsets niceties effectively, and it's all so easily ignorable if you're immune to such things, or you can just be amused by the posts as I am or, if you prefer, you can let yourself get all hot, bothered, and into an outraged froth. Slainte.
I can relate to that post, although I tend to be less tolerant of rudeness. If I remember aright you read Private Eye which seems to me to sit with such a view. Be careful though: you might graduate to The Spectator and therein lies intellectual purgatory on account of the crossword being loads harder than the one in the Eye.
 

Sgian Dubh

Established Member
Joined
12 Oct 2004
Messages
2,194
Reaction score
73
Location
UK
If I remember aright you read Private Eye which seems to me to sit with such a view. Be careful though: you might graduate to The Spectator and therein lies intellectual purgatory on account of the crossword being loads harder than the one in the Eye.
Oh yes, I'm a Private Eye reader. I do so to keep my world weariness and cynicism in good shape so there's little or no chance of me becoming too, er, 'nice' and sympathetic. I can't see me moving on to the Specy, and I've never really been into crossword puzzles - I prefer to waste my time in other pursuits, ha, ha. Slainte.
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,604
Reaction score
422
Location
Pembrokeshire
Funnily enough, I was using a little bit of Norwegian Spruce today for some random bit of tat around the workshop and upon remembering this thread I decided to plane it with what I thought was a fairly sharp plane, going with the grain as best as I could make out:

IMG_2080.JPG

Of course, the iron wasn't so sharp you could split atoms with it, and the cap iron probably wasn't set to the standard some would like, and the frog probably wasn't set correctly, and for all I know the plane probably has a 25mm bow in the sole, and probably some other problem I'll get chastised about, but I can categorically say without a doubt, this wood is absolutely terrible stuff to work. So, If Seb is still reading this, use better wood!
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,604
Reaction score
422
Location
Pembrokeshire
I bet you didn't break chips out of your iron, though, on that knot.
Actually, the knot is probably the cleanest planed bit of the timber :ROFLMAO:. To be fair, the Record Tungsten Steel irons are pretty tough! But maybe I wasn't trying hard enough and my edge not quite delicate enough to break off.
 

Tony Zaffuto

Established Member
Joined
28 Mar 2007
Messages
307
Reaction score
8
Location
DuBois, Penna.
Works similar to the spruce available here in the states! Sanding is not a solution, as it gums paper readily. Sold as "construction lumber".

What other screen names does "Seb" use?
 
Top