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gav

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I have some old chairs where the glue joints have failed that I would like to repair.

I was going to take them apart and reglue them. I know I have got to remove all the old glue first before regluing but what sort of glue should I use to redo them? Would soemthing like titebond do or should I use something like cascamite?

Gav
 

Adam

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gav":27dijbgu said:
use something like cascamite?Gav
Not sure, but just to let you know Cascamite is now called Extramite. And if you have any Cascamite left, by defitinion its probably so old it needs replacing with some Extramite!

Adam
 

OPJ

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What about this "Chair Doctor" (Veritas) I've noticed on sites such as D&M and Rutlands?

Or is this strictly for 'repair' joints (splitting, etc)?
I wouldn't like to think of re-gluing a M&T joint as a 'repair' as such when both parts are still in tact.


Infact, I applied some yesterday. I noticed the Franklin Library/Ladder Chair I made [in the picture] had split about 4" on the face side of the rear seat, right above the piano hinge. So when I reached for some PVA to patch it up (I thought Gorilla Glue would be overkill), I noticed the long-forgotten Chair Doctor glue I bought for such a rainy day and strapped it up with masking tape (Alan Herd-style).

It's had more than 12 hours to set now, but if only it wasn't so bleedin' cold outside I'd get back out there and finish it! :(
 

PowerTool

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Assuming it's just for indoor use,I've repaired several pub stools with PVA - as said,just make sure you clean the old glue off first :)

Andrew
 

JFC

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Regluing wont resolve the problem IMHO . You need to take the chairs apart and make a small saw cut with the grain down the tenon . Then make a very small wedge to go in the cut to expand the tenon/split the wood . When you put the chairs back together with any glue you choose the small wedges will expand the tenon making a tight joint again .
 

Colin C

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Where to start :)
First this is for all DO NOT USE Extramite as for chairs it is to hard ( ok if its going out side on grass), 22 years as a furnture restorer has told me this.

You can use pva, just make sure you have all the old glue off, best way is to use an old plane iron that has just come off the grinder or a chisel.

Do they have lose seats, if they do you will have to make sure you glue them up so the seats will go back in, plus check the distance from the front rail to the top of the back and make sure there is no more than 6 mm diference between them ( if they are the same)

If you can post a picture, I can help you

Best of luck
Ps the is no need for the wedges as you can use veneerto take up any space that is there ( it will help if and when they become lose again :wink:
 

Jokerman

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Just to add me own 2 pennorth.

I agree the joints need to be knocked or pressed apart so you can have a good look at why they possibly failed in the first place.

If after cleaning off all the old glue from both M&T you dry assemble and find the joint is sloppy you need a gap filling glue. Some joints are only .5 of a mm loose and fiddling about with wedges and veneer can be time consuming and frustrating. Although extramite is hard and brittle provided it has a good key to the mating surfaces the joint shouldn't fail.

What I tend to do is accept that the joint for whatever reason is loose and needs something to take up the slack.

If you take an old hacksaw blade and roughen up all mating surfaces you provide the essential key for the glue to get into both sides of the joint. I'd also suggest making a couple of shallow cuts along the length of the tenon to enable excess glue to be squeezed out as you cramp up the joint. Don't be tempted to use PU as, although it's a brilliant product, its a pig to clean up from small joints in delicate areas unless you want to strip, sand and re-finish the chairs.

PVA only really works on good tight joints so for all others I'd use extramite. Used properly I'd suggest it's the best way in your situation.

PS have a look at your tub of Cascamite and try to find a use by date.

Good Luck

Mike
 

Colin C

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Hi heanorhorse,
I will have to say that of all the joints I have seen fail, it has been extramite ( mostly when used for gap filling). As it is a very good glue on some jobs, this makes it very hard to remove the joint.

I have used most glues and would NOT use extramite for chairs unless they are going outside on soft ground as extramite has on give so it means the joint can break down but leave a joint that is very hard to part ( I have had to do this many times ( 22 years furniture restorer )

Pva is very easy to clean off, just use clean water, cloth and a an old paint brush ( easier if the water is warm )
Veneer on a lose tenon or dowel is not hard, just as long as you make sure the grain on the veneer is in the same direction as the tenon and if you lay the veneer part way in the mortis the tenon will do the rest
 
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