• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Chainsaw Safety?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Travis Byrne

Established Member
Joined
4 May 2004
Messages
253
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma, USA
Hello Dave

A few things come to mind when using the chain saw.
Getting your self ready:
Wear safety goggles or shield
Wear heavy gloves
Maybe some heavy boots (steel toed type) cut offs can mash toes
Hearing protection if using gasoline type saw
Getting equipment ready:
Have a sharp chain
Check the kickback on saw to make sure its working
Make sure the chain has proper tension. It stretches when it gets hot
Make sure that the oiler is working properly
WOOD PREP:
Get the wood off the ground (place on saw bucks or even place apiece of fire wood under it if it is too large to place on saw buck
When sawing, place the saw as close to the wood as possible(in other words, don't saw with the tip of the saw)This helps prevent kickbacks
Don't saw any wood between supports, only saw the free end of the wood)This will keep the saw blade from getting pinched and causing a kick back or stuck chain
Stand to side of the saw a little (don't stand directly behind saw)
I am right handed and I stand with left foot forward and right fool behind a little and keep a firm grip on the saw

Don't be upset if I am telling you stuff that you already know. This list is not all inclusive as I am sure that others have different view points, but this list of safety items has served me well for manny years. :D

A new saw will come with manny safety reminders.
PS Keep the chain out of the dirt!!!!!! :twisted:

Hope this helps
Travis
 

trevtheturner

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2003
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire, UK.
Hi Dave,

Travis has already covered many of the points.

Sounds like a chainsaw would certainly make your life a lot easier. Much like any other piece of machinery really - knowing what it does, its capabilities and limitations, dangers, proper use and precautions to follow - oh, and, as TX says, a regular touch up works wonders!

I'm in Herefordshire, between Hereford and Leominster. I use both types - petrol engined and electric. PM me if you want for a 'phone no. - we can then arrange to have a chat about it for starters, unless you want to come over and saw some logs for me? :wink:

Cheers,

Trev.
 

RogerS

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2004
Messages
17,390
Reaction score
78
Location
In the eternally wet North
Or me, Dave. I have a petrol Stihl. Live near Malvern.

Don't use old petrol - 2 or 3 months max in the can.

Don't use old mixed fuel/2stroke - fresh is best

Run it dry when you finish

Make sure the chain oil is kept topped up

Make sure you adjust the tension of the belt.....as it warms up and expands.

Use it often or be prepared for the frustration of trying to get it to start

Finally, if it won't start, take the plug out and pour a little petrol on it and light it to burn off the oil/warm it up.
 

Quetech

Established Member
Joined
8 Jan 2005
Messages
53
Reaction score
0
Location
North East Scotland
Dave

On the safety side I think it has all been said except maybe check any
material for nails/stones etc.

I would not recomend going smaller than a 50cc machine I have a 50cc and an 80cc Dolmar.
The 80 is a monster and makes short work of anything I give it but it is
heavy for prolonged use.
The 50 is a nice weight to use and has a reasonable amount of power
if your not cutting anything to big.
Buy several chains so you always have a sharp one to hand as it makes a
world of difference.

Mike
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Roger Sinden":43t1r8sa said:
Finally, if it won't start, take the plug out and pour a little petrol on it and light it to burn off the oil/warm it up.
Roger, What do you do with the spare plugs when you have burnt up your saws? :lol: :lol:
 

Manny

Established Member
Joined
31 Mar 2004
Messages
152
Reaction score
0
Location
London
On the safety side I think it has all been said except maybe check any
material for nails/stones etc.
I know of someone who was using a chainsaw, the saw hit a piece of barbed wire that was embedded in a log, it bounced back and hit him on the side of the head, not sure if he was wearing a helmet. He is lucky to be alive but does have an impressive looking scar running across his forhead.
 

Taffy Turner

Established Member
Joined
24 May 2004
Messages
1,067
Reaction score
0
Location
The Land of My Fathers
Make sure you where good strong steel toe-cap boots, preferrably proper chainsaw boots. I saw some pictures once at a chainsaw safety exhibition at the Royal Welsh Show of a guy who had been using a chainsaw wearing trainers. The saw went through the wood a bit quicker than he was expecting, and the next thing it met was his foot........

Put me of my lunch that was for sure!
 

kityuser

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Messages
1,108
Reaction score
0
why not go for an elecy one?

cheap and quite a bit less dangerous, quieter too.


however petrol ones can be pigs if not treated well.

I always like to remember that chainsaws don`t cut wood, they tear massive lumps out.
Not suprisingly they are better at tearing humans than wood, however I have seen some NASTY cuts from saws that were`nt even running (rubbing up against the chain).

I think one thing that has`nt been mentioned is cutting with the tip, you should never ever lead into the wood bar-tip first. This is one of the easiest ways to get kickback.
(roller tip bars are a nice anti-kickback precaution)

when I used to help cut up logwood (exactly as you intend) we used a saw-horse type arrangement so that the wood is presented and clamped at about waist height, its alot safer and saves your back.

hope some of this helps

steve
 

Vormulac

Established Member
Joined
10 Oct 2004
Messages
1,217
Reaction score
0
Location
Uxbridge, West London
I have a Bosch electric chainsaw that I picked up for about £50 online. Assuming you're not planning on cutting a swathe through a mature forest I would be surprised if your needs went beyond an electric one, it certainly is no wimp!

Tips and points that spring to mind:

Get spare chains, keep them sharp and don't let them rust.
Use a CCD, you think a lawnmower will make a mess of a power cord, you ain't seen nothing yet...
Use a full face shield instead of goggles, chainsaws throw small chunks of wood about and you don't want to be distracted from what you're doing by a handful of wooden debris suddenly arriving in your mouth.
Simply exercise common sense about how you stand and where you put your feet.
Use the grab-teeth (a sharp piece of metal mounted on the front of the chainsaw body) to lock the chainsaw in place against the wood and then slowly pivot the saw to make the cut - let the saw do the work instead of you.
Try not to grin too madly when using the chainsaw, remember, as far as everyone else is concerned you're *working* - ok? :wink:

Vormulac "Call me Tobe Hooper"...
 

Latest posts

Top