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Cedar of Lebanon Backs

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petertheeater

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I have approx 8 linear meters of wardrobe backs to make out of cedar of Lebanon (yeh I know). I know there is some debate about the efficacy of the moth repellant properties. but Im just going to try and give them what they want. I would propose to have up (or have made T&G boards). I can get sawn boards of 25 - 27mm am I insane to think I might be able to rip this into 120mm-ish strips and then bandsaw / re-saw down the middle to 10m-ish boards to T&G?
 

mr edd

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Hi

You will really struggle re-sawing 25 mm sawn to get anything useable in your target finished thickness especially flat sawn timber.
 

mr edd

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You would have more luck with dimensional stability I think by planing the 25mm boards down to a 16 or 13mm board and accepting the large amount of waste if you need to go the solid wood route.

Cheers edd
 

Hornbeam

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Allow to lose about 5mm for deep sawing , so if your material is 25mm after planing both sides then you could get 2 10mm boards. #However your material is much more likely to finish at 22mm which will leave you with 2 boards at 81/2. Have you considered using a ply back and veneering with cedar of lebanon
Ian
 

Jacob

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10mm probably OK if you don't mind having saw marks on the back, which is quite normal on a lot of old stuff - who needs a perfect back?
 

petertheeater

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Allow to lose about 5mm for deep sawing , so if your material is 25mm after planing both sides then you could get 2 10mm boards. #However your material is much more likely to finish at 22mm which will leave you with 2 boards at 81/2. Have you considered using a ply back and veneering with cedar of lebanon
Ian
I don’t think veneer would have any of the moth repelling properties. We aren’t really going for the aesthetics. COL isn’t that attractive any way.
 

petertheeater

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Hi

You will really struggle re-sawing 25 mm sawn to get anything useable in your target finished thickness especially flat sawn timber.
Yes I think I was being a bit optimistic. Might just machine down to about 16mm. The final destination, back of wardrobes, should remain fairly constant.
 

Inspector

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The Borg stores here sometimes have Aromatic Cedar Closet Liner. Maybe yours do too.

This supplier has a UK seller. Button on the bottom of the page.

Not thick enough to be self supporting but you could fasten it to plywood or 🤮MDF🤮.

Pete
 

petertheeater

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The Borg stores here sometimes have Aromatic Cedar Closet Liner. Maybe yours do too.

This supplier has a UK seller. Button on the bottom of the page.

Not thick enough to be self supporting but you could fasten it to plywood or 🤮MDF🤮.

Pete
Thanks. That stuff looks awful. Its a fine line with these designers, if you suggest something they don't like a mental tick is placed against your name and you may be relegated to obscurity. The uk link seems to lead nowhere now. Boards I'm looking at are a much more uniform light brown yellow colour.
 

peter-harrison

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I've just deepcut some 24mm beech, it finished at 9mm without too much trouble. The secret is to surface it, just enough to flatten rather than to get it totally clean, and to deepcut it slowly with a bench saw. The kerf is wider than a bandsaw but it only takes one little wander on the bandsaw to wipe out all the advantage. Try one and see how you go!
 

Inspector

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Make a pretty box with holes and fill it with cedar shavings and they can leave it in the bottom of the cabinet. 😉 It'll accomplish the same thing.😄 Silly designers should specify the wood and the source to get it factoring in the extra cost they are adding into the project.🙄

Pete
 

TheTiddles

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Cedar veneer on MDF works lovely, gives the look and smell whilst being far stronger
 

petertheeater

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Make a pretty box with holes and fill it with cedar shavings and they can leave it in the bottom of the cabinet. 😉 It'll accomplish the same thing.😄 Silly designers should specify the wood and the source to get it factoring in the extra cost they are adding into the project.🙄

Pete
I love them. They keep me busy.
 

petertheeater

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Cedar veneer on MDF works lovely, gives the look and smell whilst being far stronger
I just couldn’t in all conscience tell them it was going to do anything for moth repelling. 0.7mm of veneer. I would think the 18mm of MDF would probably repel the moths more. 😉
 

TheTiddles

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I just couldn’t in all conscience tell them it was going to do anything for moth repelling. 0.7mm of veneer. I would think the 18mm of MDF would probably repel the moths more. 😉
Out of curiosity, why is that?
Moth killers are a few quid from Amazon and they definitely work, I’m presuming we aren’t all just using scraps of wood these days as they don’t work (and mothballs smell terrible)
 

recipio

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I think your proposal is fine, especially if you can start with 27 mm timber. Remember that Cedar of Lebanon is a soft wood and should cut nicely on a well set up bandsaw. I would make initial cuts on the tablesaw with a narrow kerf blade and finish with the bandsaw. After thicknessing you may end up with 8 - 10 mm boards which are absolutely fine for a wardrobe back. I have made backs like this using a veneered ply as a loose tongue which is easier than trying to mill T+G edges . Milling away 25 mm wood to 12 mm would depress me .:(
 

petertheeater

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Out of curiosity, why is that?
Moth killers are a few quid from Amazon and they definitely work, I’m presuming we aren’t all just using scraps of wood these days as they don’t work (and mothballs smell terrible)
Not sure I get you.
 

TheTiddles

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Not sure I get you.
What makes you think planks of cedar will have an effect that a veneer won’t?

A quick search doesn’t reveal much evidence for cedar working at all to repel or kill moths, albeit the only article I could find came from the 50’s and was compared with DDT which oddly enough worked rather well
 

bob543

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Cedar of lebanon is very easy to resaw on a bandsaw. Ive done alot of it ,. most bits ive done were around a metre length from 15mm thick boards to 6-7mm and this was 8 to 9 " high stuff. I used a meat and fish cutting blade .
 

petertheeater

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What makes you think planks of cedar will have an effect that a veneer won’t?
Just the amount of actual wood in solid as opposed to 0.7mm veneer.

A quick search doesn’t reveal much evidence for cedar working at all to repel or kill moths, albeit the only article I could find came from the 50’s and was compared with DDT which oddly enough worked rather well
Please read my original post with regard to the efficacy.
But thanks.
 
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