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CAT 6, 7 or 8 ?

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thetyreman

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thinking of installing some wall outlets for ethernet as I've had enough of wireless internet dropping out e.t.c.

it wouldn't be much more work to make say CAT 7 or even CAT 8 cables, they'll be under the floor and wired into ethernet boxes in a couple of rooms on the walls. This then being connected to the router via ethernet cable.

just wondering basically if it's worth future proofing the ethernet connections, CAT7 is 10x the speed of CAT6 and from what I know they are backwards compatible with RJ45 connectors, most people seem to be using CAT5 still.

I have heard there will be significant speed improvements in the next few years which is why I am interested.

any advice?

cheers,

Ben.
 

Doug71

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When I did my house about 10 years ago I was told to run 3 Cat 5 cables from a central hub to every room in the house to "future proof it". I now hear people talking Cat 7 & 8 and that my future proofing is not so future proof #-o

I have just started looking in to a mesh wifi system, does anybody know much about them? My house is a bit sprawly so has 3 wireless access points plus an extender, problem is portable devices don't always switch between points very quickly, I am told a wifi mesh is the way forwards?
 

porker

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I have a Wifi mesh system fitted with 3 points and it has transformed the coverage in my large house which is around 130 years old with thick 3ft solid walls and around 4000sq ft. Prior to this I used a mix of access points and powerline adaptors that use the wiring to route the signal. I get solid Wifi in every room now and take a cable from the points to odd bits of equipment that are not Wifi. Mine is a TP Link system and also gives me more control of my kids devices than my ISP supplied router.

I got the mesh kit after installing ethernet cabling which I am not using. I think chasing futureproofing can be difficult. What we think will be around in 10 years could be wrong. I would go with CAT5e and install in such a way that other cable could be pulled in if required when everyone decides home fibre is the way to go.
 

RogerS

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First question.....why ? What are you doing that requires mega-speeds down the cable ?

I'm also a great fan of mesh networks. Just signed up to Zen EveryRoom Service.

I'm already using one FritzBox as one element in the workshop but needed better coverage inside parts of the house. Can't recommend the Fritz stuff (who said the Germans didn't have a sense of humour ?) highly enough. Beats a theTP-Link, Netgear stuff into a cocked hat.
 

MikeK

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If I had the opportunity to upgrade the communications in my house, I would run four or six core OM4 multimode fiber throughout and not bother with copper. It's only a matter of time before Telekom installs fiber to my area, and I would not want my existing infrastructure to be the limiting factor. Media converters are available that will interface between the fiber and today's technology.

Many years ago, while my best friend was having his house built in Virginia, we had a weekend opportunity to install cable TV and network infrastructure throughout the house. He was a software developer and worked from home about half of the time using his own servers, so he needed (wanted) lots bandwidth.

Our original plan was to run RG-58 for all of the thinnet drops from the basement patch panel to each room and use the correct staples to attach the cable to the wall studs. Later, we changed the plan and decided to install 3/4-inch flex conduit in case he wanted to install more cables later. Since we had been planning this for weeks waiting for the short window, we had all of the material on hand to install conduit, pull boxes, termination boxes, and the cable.

The interior framing was finished on a Thursday and the drywall installers were scheduled to arrive the following Monday, so everything had to be in place before they arrived and sealed up the walls. We brought in another friend and had all of the conduit, boxes, and most of the cable run by Monday morning. We had pull ropes for the rest of the cable and finished all of the runs, terminations, and testing over the next few weekends.

About six years later, the support for the thinnet started drying up, so we used the existing coaxial cable to pull CAT-3 copper to all of the network drops. Some time later, after I left for Germany, he used the CAT-3 copper to pull 62.5/125-micron fiber throughout the house. As far as I know, the fiber is still in place, with media converters where needed. He changed the network interface cards in his computers to accommodate the LAN connections.
 

Terry - Somerset

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It may just be extreme ignorance on my part, but I do not understand what is so critical that high speeds beyond standard wifi is required in a domestic setting.

Or is it a security issue - wifi being easier (possibly) to intercept than hard wired despite router passwords. For larger properties or thick walls I can understand the need for a couple of wireless routers.

I was delighted when routers improved to the point that I could get rid of all the cabling around the house (2000 sq ft so moderate size) - there is now one cable entry point with phones, computing and TV all served by a wireless signal.
 

thetyreman

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I use my computer for business, it is critical to me that the speeds are as high as possible and as secure as possible, I'm also wanting to create a proper network so that it can easily be tapped into and different computers can easily communicate with each other, all without wireless, so I can transfer data between 2 or 3 computers and a printer easily, I regularly work with huge file sizes, it's mostly audio work. I will still use the wireless for mobile phones and ipad but it's not my main priority.

I once used the cable with my current PC and it was so much snappier and faster especially both download and upload speeds, and that's with just an old CAT5e cable, not a CAT6 or 7 or 8, hence why I am wondering if it's worthwhile upgrading :D

I made a decision to remove the original cable but it can easily be put back, it just needs a hole drilling in the floor again.
 

Phil Pascoe

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My priority for years has been to ensure conduits and ducts were put in everywhere on any major job, rather than what was actually in them - especially if you end up in a house for many years it saves things coming back to bite you.

This could be quite an interesting thread as I'm about to get friend (paid well :D ) to re route my incoming phone line, as for one the router has to be moved, for two I have a few small problems that BT will say are internal and I want to get my retaliation in first.
 

RogerS

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phil.p":2k5jqpdn said:
My priority for years has been to ensure conduits and ducts were put in everywhere on any major job, rather than what was actually in them - especially if you end up in a house for many years it saves things coming back to bite you.

This could be quite an interesting thread as I'm about to get friend (paid well :D ) to re route my incoming phone line, as for one the router has to be moved, for two I have a few small problems that BT will say are internal and I want to get my retaliation in first.
Ditch BT. Get your line and broadband from Zen. OK...they still need Openreach to provide the service but they can kick butt when needed.
 

RogerS

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thetyreman":1mcegi0k said:
I use my computer for business, it is critical to me that the speeds are as high as possible and as secure as possible, I'm also wanting to create a proper network so that it can easily be tapped into and different computers can easily communicate with each other, all without wireless, so I can transfer data between 2 or 3 computers and a printer easily, I regularly work with huge file sizes, it's mostly audio work. I will still use the wireless for mobile phones and ipad but it's not my main priority.

I once used the cable with my current PC and it was so much snappier and faster especially both download and upload speeds, and that's with just an old CAT5e cable, not a CAT6 or 7 or 8, hence why I am wondering if it's worthwhile upgrading :D

I made a decision to remove the original cable but it can easily be put back, it just needs a hole drilling in the floor again.
I think you've answered your own question although I'm still not convinced that simply having faster cables will make transferring files faster for you. Surely the PC's will still be the bottleneck. Or your switch unless you're planning to upgrade that as well.
 

Pete Maddex

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Cat6 its what we use at work, I once got 850meg download speed on it, conduit is a very good idea.

Pete
 

LancsRick

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Cat5 and cat5e are different specs - if you have 5e then I'd stick with what you have.
 

Rich C

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If I were cabling now I'd put cat 6 in conduit so you can replace it by pulling new cables in the future. Cat 7 is poorly supported and uses different connectors so isn't going to be an easy fit compared to 6.
 

thetyreman

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Rich C":34zzlmgu said:
If I were cabling now I'd put cat 6 in conduit so you can replace it by pulling new cables in the future. Cat 7 is poorly supported and uses different connectors so isn't going to be an easy fit compared to 6.
I've read that you can attach RJ45 to CAT 7 though, is that wrong?
 

Droogs

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Seriously if you really want to future proof the house in regard to speed then just buy fiber it's around £200 for a 300m box and you can hire a fujikara for around £25 a day and your pig tails are £1.20 each.

It takes about 7 minutes to learn how to use the splicer properly. I used to do around 400 splices a day.

In fact offer me tea and choccy hobnobs and I'll probably come and do it for you :idea:
 

Rich C

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thetyreman":32wzqb6m said:
Rich C":32wzqb6m said:
If I were cabling now I'd put cat 6 in conduit so you can replace it by pulling new cables in the future. Cat 7 is poorly supported and uses different connectors so isn't going to be an easy fit compared to 6.
I've read that you can attach RJ45 to CAT 7 though, is that wrong?
You an attach it, but then it isn't a cat 7 system and is likely to perform much like a cat 6 system but for more money.
 

ScaredyCat

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Why aren't you installing fibre?

Seriously, there's zero need for CAT6 let alone anything else.

The only thing you should do is work out how many sockets you need and at least double it.

.
 

Rich C

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Why not fibre? Complexity, cost, the fact that everything has an rj45 so you need to convert to copper anyway.
For a home network I'm not seeing the advantages.
 

thetyreman

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rightho, looks like CAT6 is the way to go, thanks for all the advice yo, better get on with it then.
 

Irish Rover

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Your cabling just needs to handle the speed of your broadband.
Fibre speeds from Virgin are around 350mbs.
Cat 5e cable can transmit at up to 1000mbps

So even cat5e is easily good enough for the foreseeable future.
Cat 6 will see you right for a long time
 
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