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Carry sheet goods on car roof

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Jameshow

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As I a pilot, I am aware of the load placement and the affect on the center of mass (gravity) and handling. Ford publishes a separate body and chassis guide for the Ranger that shows the relevant information so vehicle converters can properly design and attach conversions. The information in this manual is similar to the aircraft manuals I used to calculate weight and balance. Sometimes I shake my head in disbelief when I see how some drivers load their vehicles and trailers...or aircraft.

I have the Super Cab, not the ubiquitous four door Crew Cab, and the Ford recommended range for the center of mass is a zone that starts at the rear of the cab and extends into the bed for over one meter. I wanted the standard cab, which provides a larger CG zone in the bed area, but the only models available without ordering were the 2WD version with the 2.2L manual transmission in white. On the Crew Cab version, the recommended CG zone starts inside the cab at about the middle of the rear seat cushions and extends rearward for about one meter, so the recommended CG zone ends about 800mm behind the cab. I bought the 4WD Wildtrak with the 3.2L 6-speed automatic transmission. It is more comfortable than the 2006 Mondeo I owned and has now become my daily driver.

I know some owners in the States modify their vehicles as you described, but this is not allowed in Germany. Unless the modifications include a TÜV certification, they cannot be installed and the penalties when caught start with loss of the vehicle and go up from there.
I did toy with building a demountable on a double cab!

Just as much space as my van but a challenge. Instead I've a transit with welfare facilities.

The 3.2 is better than the dpf troubled 2.2!

Cheers James
 

TheTiddles

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As I a pilot, I am aware of the load placement and the affect on the center of mass (gravity) and handling. Ford publishes a separate body and chassis guide for the Ranger that shows the relevant information so vehicle converters can properly design and attach conversions. The information in this manual is similar to the aircraft manuals I used to calculate weight and balance. Sometimes I shake my head in disbelief when I see how some drivers load their vehicles and trailers...or aircraft.

I have the Super Cab, not the ubiquitous four door Crew Cab, and the Ford recommended range for the center of mass is a zone that starts at the rear of the cab and extends into the bed for over one meter. I wanted the standard cab, which provides a larger CG zone in the bed area, but the only models available without ordering were the 2WD version with the 2.2L manual transmission in white. On the Crew Cab version, the recommended CG zone starts inside the cab at about the middle of the rear seat cushions and extends rearward for about one meter, so the recommended CG zone ends about 800mm behind the cab. I bought the 4WD Wildtrak with the 3.2L 6-speed automatic transmission. It is more comfortable than the 2006 Mondeo I owned and has now become my daily driver.

I know some owners in the States modify their vehicles as you described, but this is not allowed in Germany. Unless the modifications include a TÜV certification, they cannot be installed and the penalties when caught start with loss of the vehicle and go up from there.
Yes, that was my point, half of a 2.4m sheet puts the CoM after the load limit window despite the sheet fitting easily enough. I think if you put one of those fifth wheel load points in it’s all lovely, but in general most pickups seem to have the illusion of being able to transport a lot but the reality is you are in violation if you start putting a uniform load over the bed, not sure an insurer would pick up on this after the incident though, anyone got any experience of that?

The plus side of how crude those vehicles are is you can put a host of electrics, batteries and processors behind and under the seats in all the empty and previously unused space and that helps offset what you put in the back before you have to start bolting lead bricks in.
 

Jonm

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If you set up your carrier so that the rear of the sheet was a little higher than the front, you could generate aerodynamic downforce, enabling higher cornering speeds and getting your sheet goods home sooner...

Not a serious suggestion.
I suspect that would increase the speed of the air over the top of the sheet, thereby decreasing the pressure and creating more uplift.
 

Sporky McGuffin

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Ah, but the air fliwing between the car roof and sheet has to expand, lowering the pressure there...
 

Jonm

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Ah, but the air fliwing between the car roof and sheet has to expand, lowering the pressure there...
True, but underneath there is the roof rack, timber frame, cross pieces angling the wood up, roof of the car, all slowing the air down and increasing pressure. Then again, why does a helicopter fly?
 
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