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Careful who you let teach you (table saws again)

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JobandKnock

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It wasn't expensive. Last time I did it I think it needed about £30 worth of parts (bit difficult to be exact as I was repairing 3 or 4 other tools at the same time). The fence lock is a bit of a so and so to get at as you end up taking the fence off and flipping the saw on its' top to do the job. TBH I don't think that dragging it around the countryside hither and thither to fit-outs for a while (supermarket work, two nights here, three there) did it any favours, but at least it gives me a reasonable saw for when I retire ;)
 

TRITON

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I missed those entertaining sounding vids from bears workshop! :rolleyes:
Apparently he does "Bridal joints" - is that where they hang out before the wedding?
PS no they are still there https://www.youtube.com/c/BearsWorkshopUK
I don't think he knows what he's doing at all Terms — Bears Workshop Woodworking Co.
I hate seeing people working machinery with sleeves rolled down. They should be up above the elbows.

Funny thing. When he did the dry fit for the oak tray, you could see the mitres werent exactly 45deg This is why I love my mitre trimmer.
 

JBD007

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It shouldn't have come with a push block (in the UK, at least) - those stupid things are dangerous. As to no push sticks, even my crummy deWalt DW745 site saw came with a push stick

Yeah I brain farted. It did come with a thin plastic push stick which wasn't all that so I bought a set of
these which help me keep control of the board and keep my fingers away from the blade.

Screenshot_20220120-084524_Chrome.jpg
 

JobandKnock

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Oh dear, there is only one of those which keeps your hand anywhere away from the blade, and even that looks too short (should be 450mm or longer like the HSE design below it):

Push Stick Too Short.png


HSE Push Stick.png

The rest of them just don't work well on a table saw or planer. The one from the HSE site I've illustrated is similar to the one I was introduced to in wood machining training decades ago. Takes about 5 minutes to run one up on a bandsaw or even with a jigsaw, and another few minutes to round the edges. I make mine in pairs from any timber to hand (generally knot-free pine as we tend to have a lot of it about). If I cream cracker one I just cut another from an offcut
 
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Jacob

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Oh dear, there is only one of those which keeps your hand anywhere away from the blade, and even that looks too short (should be 450mm or longer like the HSE design below it):

View attachment 127451

View attachment 127452
The rest of them just don't work we;; on a table saw or planer. The one from the HSE site I've illustrated is similar to the one I was introduced to in wood machining training decades ago. Takes about 5 minutes to run one up on a bandsaw or even with a jigsaw, and another few minutes to round the edges. I make mine in pairs from any timber to hand (generally knot-free pine as we tend to have a lot of it about). If I cream cracker one I just cut another from an offcut
I agree bin them all except one.
Except IMHO the standard pattern is a better shape than the HSE design which has only a tiny birdsmouth. The bigger birdsmouth gives more control - pressing down at the tip, or in at the bottom lip, or both and anywhere in between
 

JBD007

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No, I definitely do not put my hands near the blade, ever. Which is why I still have all my fingers and thumbs. I'm comfortable using these blocks, it's about using the right ones for the right piece of timber.
 

Doug71

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I have recently added a slightly different style of push stick to my collection which I have found quite useful, it doesn't replace a normal push stick but is handy to have alongside it.

It's just basically a push stick with a spike at the end instead of a birds mouth (hammer in nail, cut off, grind to a point). Obviously you don't want it anywhere near the blade but I find it works well in some situations having the spiked version in your left hand with a normal one in your right, the spiked version does seem to give you more control, also really handy for moving off cuts out of the way.

It was Trevanion (once of this parish) who suggested I try one and glad I did 🤞
 

pe2dave

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No, I definitely do not put my hands near the blade, ever. Which is why I still have all my fingers and thumbs. I'm comfortable using these blocks, it's about using the right ones for the right piece of timber.
Quite agree. My brother in law is missing three 'half fingers' from that trick.
 

Doug71

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Same as Dr Bob I have no problem with long sleeves as long as they are tight fitting.

The hoodie seems to be standard workwear these days, I'm not that keen on them in the workshop, especially the ones with the drawstrings hanging down 😬

I remember someone quoting from an old Sedgwick manual that it was recommended you wore a clip on tie, how our standards have dropped 😂 😂 😂
 

JBD007

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I wouldn't wear a hoodie, way too baggy and as mentioned there's the draw strings hanging down. It's a polo shirt and well fitted fleece for me, cargo work trousers and my dewalt work boots.

If it's hot I might switch into my lederhosen...
 

TheTiddles

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Everyone should wear hoodies, they’re multi-purpose, keeping you warm and making you cool, both at the same time.
 

TRITON

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No way, I'd be frozen for 6 months of the year, get Guarding sorted and forget the sleeves (I'd say no baggy sleeves)
For me it comes from working in a butchers for years. Supermarkets were the worst really as the prep room is held at a constant 2c degrees and all you have is a short sleeved shirt. But most shops if you complain about being cold the answer is WORK HARDER.
I think the worst was one winter when it was about -5c in the shop, and butchers shops dont have heating. Hands so cold small cuts didnt bleed,and it was warmer in the chill. Come wash up was the joy of the day.
 
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