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Carborundum Company Manchester , Stone grade

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whatknot

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Hi all

I wasn't sure if to post this in tools or general

Went to a car boot earlier, very little of interest to me

But picked up a sharpening stone, made by the Manchester Carborundum company Trafford Park Manchester

On the end of the box it says 116 (then a rip) 1" silicon carbide

Anyone have a catalogue of know what grade a 116 stone is please?

Its in very good nick, looks like its hardly been used at all

Cheers
 

AndyT

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This would be much easier if you would post a picture, or at least give us a clue from the packaging of what sort of date to go back to.

Without that, taking a stab in the dark, it's just possible that there was a connection between the Carborundum Company in Manchester and the Carborundum Company in New York. If there is, then this 1906 catalogue might be relevant.

https://archive.org/details/Carborundum ... atalog1906

Have a look at page 30. There is a stone listed there with a code number of 116. If that's the same as yours, the answer is "Medium." How about that!
 

Cheshirechappie

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You'll get a fair idea of grade by passing a finger over the surface. Rougher is coarser, a smoothish feel is a finer grade - no rocket science needed!. An even better idea can be had by using it to put an edge on a chisel and then trying the chisel on a scrap or two of wood. You'll also find out how fast-cutting it is, that way.
 

whatknot

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Thanks for that, yes the company started in America in 1895, and they opened factories in Germany then Trafford Park

I hadn't thought to look at archive.org for a catalogue, I use it all the time so should have checked there

The box is a standard cardboard one of which there are quite a few listed in ebay, but aside of the partial label on the end nothing to help identify it further, I don't think its that early, possibly 60's or 70's

In the catalogue it certainly matches the 8" x 2" x 1"

Many thanks that answers my question nicely
 

whatknot

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Thanks for that but I wasn't really looking for rocket science ;-)

Just a little on what grade it was, which I now know

I knew what I thought it was, but not what it was originally sold as

But thanks for your reply

Cheshirechappie":10zljihp said:
You'll get a fair idea of grade by passing a finger over the surface. Rougher is coarser, a smoothish feel is a finer grade - no rocket science needed!. An even better idea can be had by using it to put an edge on a chisel and then trying the chisel on a scrap or two of wood. You'll also find out how fast-cutting it is, that way.
 

whatknot

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Actually, just realised on the end of the box where part of the label was ripped off it had UM just visible after the rip

I thought it was the last two of carborundum but now see its to short and is the end of MEDIUM ;-)

Oh well teaches me to look further :)
 

AndyT

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Re catalogues at the Internet Archive - use this link for a collection of over 3000 items, put together by tool entusiast Mark Stansbury. He has found or personally scanned catalogues from many countries, going back to the eighteenth century. Having scanned a few catalogues myself, I respect the amount of work he has put in to making this sort of information available. It's a great resource.

https://archive.org/details/internation ... loglibrary
 

tsb

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My neighbour was the European sales director for the Carborundum Company until he retired.Was very handy for sandpaper samples when he working. Sadly he passed away last year but I was always amazed how many different variety of companies would use their abrasives
 

whatknot

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Thank you for that, my normal usage of archive.org is for genealogy but am often surprised by the wealth of information on there

I shall investigate that link later

AndyT":yj9uyrnl said:
Re catalogues at the Internet Archive - use this link for a collection of over 3000 items, put together by tool entusiast Mark Stansbury. He has found or personally scanned catalogues from many countries, going back to the eighteenth century. Having scanned a few catalogues myself, I respect the amount of work he has put in to making this sort of information available. It's a great resource.

https://archive.org/details/internation ... loglibrary
 

whatknot

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I am fairly sure I have been using their products in one form or another for many years without giving it a thought, sad they closed in the UK like so many others

tsb":17v21j05 said:
My neighbour was the European sales director for the Carborundum Company until he retired.Was very handy for sandpaper samples when he working. Sadly he passed away last year but I was always amazed how many different variety of companies would use their abrasives
 
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