Car Diagnostic scanners - anybody use them?

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Spectric

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Had another thought on this, something that has changed is that designers now rely to heavily on computer modeling and CAD to the point gut feeling and past lessons get ignored. Any model is only as good as the data it is created from, there is still a lot that could be learnt from the way designs were handled many years ago but they required more engineers and time so in todays rush to the finish line you can see how mistakes are made. We would physically model sub systems and fit instruments such as torque meters and strain gauges to get an accurate picture of the potential design and be in a position to iron out any problems before pre production parts were made, now I believe they use mathematical models and a prayer.
 

morqthana

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You don't find there are so many electrical components to go wrong???
Sorry - it was a joke about the way the value of that car fell off a cliff as soon as it was driven out of the showroom - one of the best examples ever of why buying a used premium car can be such good VFM.

It probably does have lots of electrics to go wrong, like many luxury cars. I've never owned one (I did think about one for a while, as I quite fancied the V10 diesel), but as far as I know VAG are pretty good at making reliable products.
 

J-G

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were is a better description, but we should not lay all the blame on the OEM's because a lot of complexity has come from them having to meet the EURO emission standards.
Isn't it famously the case that they didn't 'meet' the standards - they circumvented them o_O
 

Spectric

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Yes that is a good point, those requirements could have been met but at the sacrifice of durability and that would have been more expensive in warranty so instead a bit of getting round them was introduced. That also sounds familiar with our government, these are the rules but will will get round them. It was not just VW either by all accounts and others may have got away with it completely.
 

Terry - Somerset

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The optimal solution is to deliver a car to the first user, which operates faultlessly and generates no warranty claims. Generating sales needs performance, price, functionality, gizmos, economy, etc to differentiate it from the competition. No sales = no business.

Reliability and longevity cost - so most manufacturers limit specification to cover the first user and/or warranty period (mostly 3 - 7 years). Taxation and fuel economy are significant factors in purchase decisions - so expect these to be optimised within whatever rules are imposed.

The law of unintended consequences means that (frequently) some regulation is wrong - eg:
  • fuel economy and emissions testing regime
  • favouring taxation of fuel based on volume not energy value (diesel vs petrol)
  • crash testing favouring vehicles equipped with expensive electronics
  • mandating spares availability for only 10 years
  • no mandatory rules for warranty length
  • etc etc
However much some may regret that cars sold must be capable of 250k miles without major failures, with spares availability out to 30 years, it simply will not happen.

Nor should it - a new car today is much better than its predecessor 30 years ago - taken to a logical conclusion we would today be driving slower, poorly equipped, more polluting, less economical cars - albeit secure in the knowledge we could fix it at the roadside with available spares and a basic tool kit.
 

Jameshow

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The optimal solution is to deliver a car to the first user, which operates faultlessly and generates no warranty claims. Generating sales needs performance, price, functionality, gizmos, economy, etc to differentiate it from the competition. No sales = no business.

Reliability and longevity cost - so most manufacturers limit specification to cover the first user and/or warranty period (mostly 3 - 7 years). Taxation and fuel economy are significant factors in purchase decisions - so expect these to be optimised within whatever rules are imposed.

The law of unintended consequences means that (frequently) some regulation is wrong - eg:
  • fuel economy and emissions testing regime
  • favouring taxation of fuel based on volume not energy value (diesel vs petrol)
  • crash testing favouring vehicles equipped with expensive electronics
  • mandating spares availability for only 10 years
  • no mandatory rules for warranty length
  • etc etc
However much some may regret that cars sold must be capable of 250k miles without major failures, with spares availability out to 30 years, it simply will not happen.

Nor should it - a new car today is much better than its predecessor 30 years ago - taken to a logical conclusion we would today be driving slower, poorly equipped, more polluting, less economical cars - albeit secure in the knowledge we could fix it at the roadside with available spares and a basic tool kit.

Sounds like a Volvo 740/940 to me!🤣🤣🤣
 

undergroundhunter

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With respect you had the advantage of knowing that it had already been established that it wasn’t the MAP sensor at fault. A lot of main dealers would no doubt have also initially replaced the MAP sensor!?
I absolutely would not fit a part without first establishing if it had what it needed to function, in this case a 5v supply and a ground, which it did not. Anyone who fits a part without checking the basics is just an silly person.
 
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