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Car Boot Capture

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mahking51

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Possibly one for Alf here; found this at a tool sale at a local hospice near me. Mostly old garden tools and mechanics stuff but missed a 604 Bedrock at £12 and a Stanley 130 to the guy in front of me for £4.
This was under the table in a box of old surforms and busted hammers; it was covered in grease and muck but still had to give a fiver for it as the lady on the stall was Scottish and having none of my haggling nonsense :)

It appears to be by Marples (Hibernia) from the iron but nothing on the body except an owners mark A Copland. There are a few very old worm holes and a couple of small cracks just starting around the depth adjuster.
It cleaned up well with 0000 steel wool and paste wax.
What does the panel think apart from the fact that I possibly suck! :lol:






Any info welcome
Regards
Martin
 

MikeW

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Well, you do suck :lol:

Now that is out of the way...what a great find for a great price, Martin! It really cleaned up nicely.

I can't help you on any info. Don't got the books. The word 'wow' keeps coming to mind.

Great one. Mike
 

Alf

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Martin,

You do indeed sucketh most mightily. That there plane's a handled bridle plough. Not as popular as their ease of use should have made them, so a Good Find. A quick skim of the relevant bit of BPMs suggests there's a good chance it's Scottish. Different from the usual run of British ploughs, in that the fence stems are fixed in the stock and the fence moves in the Continental manner, rather than the stems moving through the stock.

Now you need to find some more irons to go with it. :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

bugbear

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It appears to be by Marples (Hibernia) from the iron
Of course, that iron may (or may not) be original. I'd label this as "brand unknown".

Have you checked VERY carefully on the front, under intense, low (grazing) light?

BugBear
 
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Anonymous

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You paid a whole FIVER for this??? I sure hope you got a full set of irons for that kind of money! :lol: :lol:
That is a beautiful plane and I think you did the perfect amount of cleanup on it.
No doubt about it, you suck! :lol:
 
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Anonymous

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Newbie alert: what kind of groove does a handled bridle plough cut? I just can't imagine what this thing does.

Thank you.
 

Chris Knight

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Roger Nixon":yrkz6j9u said:
You paid a whole FIVER for this??? I sure hope you got a full set of irons for that kind of money! :lol: :lol:
That is a beautiful plane and I think you did the perfect amount of cleanup on it.
No doubt about it, you suck! :lol:
I am beginning to think that Martin buys them from Pat Leach or the like then tells us he got them at a boot sale just to make us all feel bad. :lol:

Evie, The plane just cuts a groove along the grain at a distance from the edge dictated by the fence setting. Groove width is a minimum of the blade width and can be widened by resetting the fence. Some planes as Roger implies come with a set of different width irons.
 

Alf

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Evie,

Just a regular groove along the grain. The bridle bit only refers to the manner in which the fence is held. Common or garden ploughs used wedges between the arms and the body to hold it tight. Posher ones had threaded arms and nuts. This one has that metal bridge and just needs that one thumb screw tightened to hold it firm.

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Thanks for answering! Bit of a monster just to cut a groove, or am I displaying gross ignorance? Is there an unhandled bridle plough as well? Which is not to diminish the fabulousness of getting it at a fiver, of course.

evie (just call me "question girl")
 

martyn2

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evie":2ccchlj3 said:
evie (just call me "question girl")

you carry on asking the questions :?: I'm picking information up all the time its the only way to learn

martyn :D
 

Alf

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evie":246elisv said:
Bit of a monster just to cut a groove, or am I displaying gross ignorance?
Well it can cut quite wide and deep grooves... Just wait 'til you see a #55, and then you'll have seen a monster :wink:

evie":246elisv said:
Is there an unhandled bridle plough as well?
I believe so - but I can't find a decent piccy anywhere. Basically it's like that, but...without...a...

Nah, I'm only going to be predictable if I say it. Go on, guess. :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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I would guess there were unhandled bridle plows. This thread made me realize I haven't seen a bridle plow plane in the wild or used one. A couple of other styles Alf didn't mention were the center wheel (very upscale) and the "Yankee" style which has wooden thumbscrews which clamp down on the fence arms (similar to a marking gauge).
Wooden plows can be a bit bulky because the wooden fence/arm assembly needs to be substantial but they aren't hard to handle.
I no longer have any wooden plows, I prefer my Stanley #45 & #50 for plowing grooves but I'm putting together a set of wooden planes so I should get another woody plow. I would cheerfully double (or triple) Martin's price for this one. :lol:
 

Alf

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Roger Nixon":2k1amfqe said:
I would cheerfully double (or triple) Martin's price for this one. :lol:
Get in the queue, dude. =; :lol:

I have a feeling bridle plows in 'Murrica are like centre wheels and "Yankee" style (which is a new one to me) to us in Blighty - rarely seen. But it's just an impression I have.

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Wouldn't one cut wide deep grooves with saw & chisel? Poss finished off with router plane? Or is it a question of one plough plane vs multiple operations?

I can't help comparing it to the complicated feet that came with old sewing machines - rufflers, pleaters, cutters, etc - almost always one is better off using a simple foot but preparing via pressing, basting, etc. At least, that's been my experience. On the other hand the button foot is indispensible, as is the zigzag stitch.

Is that true with woodworking as well? That some tools are workhorses that can be turned to anything, and some are really too specialised to be useful, even if you have exactly the right task?

Oh yeah, one more question... what is the classic application of the bridle plough? Grooves for shelves or something similar?

evie
 

Alf

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Question Girl":1btocafp said:
Wouldn't one cut wide deep grooves with saw & chisel? Poss finished off with router plane? Or is it a question of one plough plane vs multiple operations?
As with so much in life - it depends. For a through groove - that is, one that isn't stopped at one or both ends - not much in the hand tool world will beat the speed and ease of a plough plane. For stopped grooves, especially short ones, a saw and chisel comes into play.

evie":1btocafp said:
I can't help comparing it to the complicated feet that came with old sewing machines - rufflers, pleaters, cutters, etc - almost always one is better off using a simple foot but preparing via pressing, basting, etc. At least, that's been my experience. On the other hand the button foot is indispensible, as is the zigzag stitch.
Er, right... 8-[ ] BugBear, one for you - you know more about sewing machines than I do!

evie":1btocafp said:
Is that true with woodworking as well? That some tools are workhorses that can be turned to anything, and some are really too specialised to be useful, even if you have exactly the right task?
Can be, yes. The #444 dovetail plane might be a good example. 'Course some folks will argue the #55, f'rinstance, is a good example of a tool that can do a whole range of things badly. (At this point, if you haven't found it already, you'll find Blood & Gore handy.)

evie":1btocafp said:
Oh yeah, one more question... what is the classic application of the bridle plough? Grooves for shelves or something similar?
Ah, I wonder if we have a small terminology mix-up here? We get those a lot - there's so much available terminology around waiting to be mixed up. #-o
A groove is a made along the grain - maybe to take the bottom of a box, the panel of a door and so forth.
A housing or dado is made across the grain - such as for a shelf.
For a housing or dado, there are, naturally, dado planes. :D Then there are the lovely combination planes (where we start getting into metal models, rather than wooden, although there are rare combination planes in wood - but that's a collector thing) which are able to cut grooves and housings. And often simple mouldings too.

It's about this time that you're probably feeling like you've been pushed out of an aeroplane at about 10,000ft and splashed into a bottomless ocean of information, tools and terminology, all of which seem to be demanding to be understood and used all at once. It may also be that you feel as if you're drowning.

Welcome to The Slippery Slope. :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Thank you answer Alf!

So, what is the classic application of a groove, such as that created by a plough plane (bridle, Yankee, or otherwise)? Um... slatting in bed frames? Honestly I can't imagine why I'd need a deep long groove on the grain. Not like a <i>dado</i>, something wholly different, I now comprehend. javascript:emoticon(':)')

question girl!

PS I must leave now to go to class, where I shall create my Very First Stopped Housing Joint, having successfully made a Corner Housing Joint and and a Through Housing Joint previously. I am, in fact, invincible. javascript:emoticon('8)')
 
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Anonymous

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As Alf mentioned grooves are commonly used to hold panels (i.e. frame and panel doors, bottoms for boxes and drawers). Combine a grooving plane with a matching tongueing plane and you have <obvious> :lol: </obvious>.
 
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