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phoebus

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I'm upgrading my current (retail store-style) table saw with a contractor-style saw as I have small workshop and also work outside during warmer months.

I'm looking at four models available in my place (Slovenia) for my price range (< 1k €): Dewalt 745, Metabo TS 254, Bosch GTS 10 XC and Makita 2704/2.
I mostly ruled out Metabo (200 € more expensive than others) and Dewalt (rack & pinion fence looks nice but considering the specs [engine type, brake,...] it looks inferior to other models for the same price]) so I'm mostly deciding between Makita and Bosch.

Former has larger table and is (purpotedly) more solid (i.e. less wobbly) while the latter has sliding table and more powerful engine but has nonstandard slots and has (purpotedly) wobbly sliding table and left slot.

Can you help me make a final deicision? :)
 

PaulR

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I had the Bosch, and chose it after a lot of research, I’d highly recommend


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phoebus":13f0k00o said:
I'm upgrading my current (retail store-style) table saw with a contractor-style saw as I have small workshop and also work outside during warmer months.

I'm looking at four models available in my place (Slovenia) for my price range (< 1k €): Dewalt 745, Metabo TS 254, Bosch GTS 10 XC and Makita 2704/2.
I mostly ruled out Metabo (200 € more expensive than others) and Dewalt (rack & pinion fence looks nice but considering the specs [engine type, brake,...] it looks inferior to other models for the same price]) so I'm mostly deciding between Makita and Bosch.

Former has larger table and is (purpotedly) more solid (i.e. less wobbly) while the latter has sliding table and more powerful engine but has nonstandard slots and has (purpotedly) wobbly sliding table and left slot.

Can you help me make a final deicision? :)
When you say "work outside", does that mean out and about on jobs, or just not in the garage? If it's just for wheeling out when the sun is shining, a wheeled cabinet under a cast iron table may be better than a contractor saw.

I was where you are 6 months ago, and I finally went with the Axminster AC216 (https://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-c ... saw-104926). I have to say I am more than happy with the accuracy and the ability, but you wouldn't want to carry it far (70kg, I think).

If it's for on site work, or you need to hang it up after use, forget I said anything.
 
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Trainee neophyte":1ornmtn0 said:
phoebus":1ornmtn0 said:
I'm upgrading my current (retail store-style) table saw with a contractor-style saw as I have small workshop and also work outside during warmer months.

I'm looking at four models available in my place (Slovenia) for my price range (< 1k €): Dewalt 745, Metabo TS 254, Bosch GTS 10 XC and Makita 2704/2.
I mostly ruled out Metabo (200 € more expensive than others) and Dewalt (rack & pinion fence looks nice but considering the specs [engine type, brake,...] it looks inferior to other models for the same price]) so I'm mostly deciding between Makita and Bosch.

Former has larger table and is (purpotedly) more solid (i.e. less wobbly) while the latter has sliding table and more powerful engine but has nonstandard slots and has (purpotedly) wobbly sliding table and left slot.

Can you help me make a final deicision? :)
When you say "work outside", does that mean out and about on jobs, or just not in the garage? If it's just for wheeling out when the sun is shining, a wheeled cabinet under a cast iron table may be better than a contractor saw.

I was where you are 6 months ago, and I finally went with the Axminster AC216 (https://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-c ... saw-104926). I have to say I am more than happy with the accuracy and the ability, but you wouldn't want to carry it far (70kg, I think).

If it's for on site work, or you need to hang it up after use, forget I said anything.
The AC216 has about half the ripping width capacity though as compared to the other saws, so something to consider. It's a real shame it has such a small table.
 

Simon_M

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I would say the two better table saws of this type are the Dewalt DW745 and the Bosch GTS 10 XC. If you like the Bosch then get it. I have the Dewalt DW745 and have no complaints. The fence is very rigid and the adjustment for 0 (90) and 45 is generous e.g. -2 to +47 degrees. Here is a one year on "what I learned" re-review for the Bosch. There is also a "few weeks review" but the later review is the one to watch. Andreas is very honest in his pros and cons. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptimBvU0fQQ and you probably can't go wrong with either of these. This type of saw has a "look" of an upturned milk crate, but I wouldn't let that put you off. It's what they don't include that matters e.g. zero hassle in use is better than some extra gimmicks IMHO and they have both reworked their designs to near perfect...

Here is a couple of jigs I made for the DW745 - one is for cutting precise angles e.g. 22.5 degrees (I have two) and one is for making tenons. Made entirely using the table saw from CLS that's "cleaned up" on the saw and 18mm ply. The Dewalt is rated as a constructors saw but I have no issues with accuracy and repeatability. With a Freud 60T blade it produces a fine and repeatable finish for cross-cutting and also ripping, that can be considered 99% finished e.g. requiring only a light sanding but not requiring planing (unless you want to) and I use this blade with (yet another) jig in lieu of an edge jointer. The success of the tenon jig relies upon the width of the fence and moveable support arm and the stability of the cast top especially for bigger workpieces.

On any table saw I wouldn't assume that the mitre is as effective as a homemade table sled for accuracy. See the comments from Andreas about the Bosch sliding sled too - I can see what he means with the same saw when I was visiting an Axminster store (might have been a one off). This feature is the main "draw" of the Bosch. I think you have to assume there will be some play and then decide if it's possible to "dial it out". If you find a quiet table saw (especially one like this) let me know and the cutting of course, further increases the sound output - sorry neighbours! Personally, I find it super quiet - when wearing Optime III Neckband Ear Defenders - NB the neckband is nice because it gives unrestrictive access to also wear a face shield e.g. both don't have headbands that "clash".
 

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phoebus

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Thanks for the replies.

@transatlantic: By "work outside" I meant in front of the house.. and now there's one more to consider. Thanks for the suggestion but TBH, I'd rather pick one with (local) warranty and service...I know I can send it back and wait for it but that takes forever and having unfinished projects laying in the garage (or even house if I'm building something bigger) while the tool is traveling is a no-no for me (and my wife :-D). :)

@simon_m: thanks... and now I'm again looking more into dewalt. I don't think I'd use the Bosch's sled (I'll be using jigs) so... I guess at the end it doesn't really matter which one of those I get (they cost the same here) :-/ And it's also true that once cutting the induction motor doesn't really change it much. So if I get dewalt for less than bosch, I guess it shouldn't do much difference if I use sleds?

Thanks all :)
 

sunnybob

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I bought the dewalt 745 6 months ago.
The fence is absolutely fantastic. Its better than anything else I have seen on a portable saw.
It IS portable, 22 kgs without a base.
It is a LOT of saw for the money and I am very pleased with it. This week I have been sawing 45 mm thick Bubinga hardwood plank 2 metres long and the motor did not slow down at all.

I cant comment on others as I have never owned another table saw.
 

thetyreman

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I used to have the dewalt 745, I liked it a lot, seems good for the money, only reason for selling it was lack of space.
 

sunnybob

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The only reason I bought mine was the lack of space to get anything bigger!
but I am very happy with it. 8)
 
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