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Can you recommend a decent hole saw kit

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Cordy

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As above, will need it to include 3 inch cutter.
I fancy having a decko at making this wheel - skip to 2 minutes 20 seconds



Will be using it in Bosch pillar drill pbd 40

Any advice much appreciated
 

JobandKnock

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Some of the best hole saws are made by Starrett - you buy the hole saw and then an appropriate mandrel, but they generally don't come as a kit unless you want to spend a lot of dosh. Other reliable brands that I've used include Bosch, Heller, Makita, Milwaukee, Morse and even deWalt. The mandrels are generally transferrable between different makes
 
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eribaMotters

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We went through loads of makes in the school workshops where I taught, but Starrett outlasted them all. You must cut the drill speed down though as even these will overheat and burn.

Colin
 

Spectric

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The newer bosch saws use a different type of mandrel, I found out the hard way! They call it the "power change" and give them credit they are easy to remove because they do not self tighten.
 

Jones

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If you want quality buy individual ones as needed, starrett are good,I haven't tried the Bosch ones.
 

JobandKnock

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The newer bosch saws use a different type of mandrel, I found out the hard way! They call it the "power change" and give them credit they are easy to remove because they do not self tighten.
The last Bosch ones I bought, about a year back, had the SDS device on top, but when it was removed (vice and adjustable spanner) they accepted the two threaded bit with two pins of a Starrett mandrel like all the rest
 

Sideways

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I have no idea what exactly these are called, but I saw a type of multipurpose holesaw demo'd at a trade show by Super-Rod. Guys who make tools for electricians to pull and thread electrical cables.
They seemed to do a much cleaner job cutting through MDF than the traditional holesaws with many teeth.
Super-Rod-April-Main.jpg
 

JobandKnock

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It's a TCT holesaw. Most use the same arbor sets as conventional bimetal holesaws. They are a lot more expensive than HSS or bimetal and not all of them are good - I have a set of Faithfull ones and they aren't the best
 

sometimewoodworker

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It's a TCT holesaw. Most use the same arbor sets as conventional bimetal holesaws. They are a lot more expensive than HSS or bimetal and not all of them are good - I have a set of Faithfull ones and they aren't the best
I have a few good metal toothed hole saws, they all have a limited life span, I have a verity of good quality TCT hole saws, I assume they must have a life span as well, I just have not found out what it is.

The TCT hole saws run well at a higher speed than the metal toothed saws as they all have better chip clearance and fewer teeth.

Hole saws in general do not give a great finished hole, so the TCT tipped ones are my preferred tools as I find them easier to use and they never clog up.


I will add pictures a little later. I have Bosch Lenox and Makita

A4B25E5D-712D-4920-ADAF-AC5235AD95E9.jpeg
 
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Terrytpot

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Finally plumped for this set a while back and been very pleased with it’s performance..Screwfix knock them outF5F6D2B2-5293-40CD-9656-4BEEA78B7370.png 80216787-B6BA-4F6E-9AD6-BE89D9947B8F.png
 

Oakay

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As above, will need it to include 3 inch cutter.
I fancy having a decko at making this wheel - skip to 2 minutes 20 seconds



Will be using it in Bosch pillar drill pbd 40

Any advice much appreciated

Any normal holesaw will overheat and lose its temper if the sawdust isn't cleared from the teeth. Unlike most other situations, the dust gets trapped having no means of escape, so compresses, therefore clearing regularly is the most effective and cooler procedure. As we use so many sizes we buy average quality sets, or bosch if a regularly used size. Carefully used, most holesaws are fine on wood, but for harder materials, better quality is required.
 

Spectric

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The last Bosch ones I bought, about a year back, had the SDS device on top, but when it was removed (vice and adjustable spanner) they accepted the two threaded bit with two pins of a Starrett mandrel like all the rest
I found that out after going back and buying the Bosch mandrel, it is quick and easy to change hole saws but the cynic in me thinks it is just a way to make you buy Bosch.
 

JobandKnock

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They are faster to change over than conventional arbor-mounted hole saws, to be sure, but just how often are you doing a job where you need to change the diameter of hole saws, and how much time will it actually save? I tried them a few years back and to my mind the biggest downside is that with those SDS thingies installed on your hole saws is that you lose the ability to nest the saws for storage and transportation. As a site guy that outweighs any miniscule speed advantage I may get
 
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hugov

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I bought this Bosch set a couple of years ago. They cut well, but a couple of them don't mount on the arbor right (of course, didn't notice until after the return window closed...) – these ones can either thread all the way on to the arbor and not use the torque pins (holes and thread out of alignment), or have them slightly loose on the arbor thread and use the pins. The former makes it almost impossible to the saw off the arbor (as it self tightens as you cut) and the latter leaves a rubbish finish and oversize holes as they wobble slightly. Perhaps I got unlucky, but next time I'll just buy Starrett ones in the sizes I need individually.
 

Johnwa

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Before I retired I worked in electrical maintenance in a pretty large factory. For years we used Starrett cutters and never had any complaints apart from price!. One day a rep came in and gave us a Starrett lookalike to try out and give a bashing for him. This was made by a company called Thorsman and was considerably cheaper than Starrett. We used this cutter for a long time and it matched the Starrett in performance and being cheaper became the go to cutter of all sizes for many sparks in this area. Thorsman were subsequently taken over by Schneider electric.Whether this affected their quality I couldn't say.(it usually does),I'd moved over to robotics by this time.
Another question. How do you use your tools, are you a tradesman who needs his tools to not let him down, or are you a home user/ diyer in which case you don't NEED super quality tools at their premium price, just decent quality gear that will probably outlast you for what you will use them. I understand the urge to buy top quality tools, I have done so many times and paid through the nose for the privilege. People can be lured into buying designer labels and items that are in fashion. Just my two pennorth, maybe I'm being a tight a€$e again lol
John
 

sometimewoodworker

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these ones can either thread all the way on to the arbor and not use the torque pins (holes and thread out of alignment), or have them slightly loose on the arbor thread and use the pins. The former makes it almost impossible to the saw off the arbor (as it self tightens as you cut) and the latter leaves a rubbish finish and oversize holes as they wobble slightly. Perhaps I got unlucky, but next time I'll just buy Starrett ones in the sizes I need individually.

my makita set has the location pins and yes when only the pins are in it may wobble BUT when the screw behind the pins is tightened it is solid as a rock. Your set seems to have a knurled ring to tighten down in place of the makita nut. I suggest that you get a makita centre and check if it will fit so you can use a spanner to lock it down
 

NormanB

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I find drilling a 10 mm hole just inside on the periphery of the holesaw cut line helps clearing and cuts cooler.
 

Spectric

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you don't NEED super quality tools
With some tools having decent ones does make the job more pleasurable plus for some achievable, nothing worse than a cheap saw that cuts out of square or does not deliver repeatable cuts. I have always had issues with chissels and struggled whenever I used them, but since buying some decent ones it has made things a lot easier and given me far better results.
 

Cordy

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Thanks for all replies and suggestions.
From eBay I am getting Starrett fast cut bi-metal holesaw 76 mm and A2 arbor

Mrs Cordy has ordered THIS from Amazon
Will post photos of wheels in due course
 
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