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Steliz

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Have a test run with a handsaw and that should tell you how easy/hard it is. It's just keratin so should be easy enough (he said, based on zero experience!).
 

treeturner123

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I would think it is no problem.

As said, it is only keratin. I use a bandsaw to cut deer antlers fro my small items. Just remember the smell!!!

Phil
 

sunnybob

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Would that cut better at higher speed? Very slow speed rate?
 

treeturner123

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The higher the speed the hotter and therefore more smell!!

It doesn't seem to matter what speed from the point of view of the cut itself.

Phil
 

Pete Maddex

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Yep I have done it my self.

What are you making? I made a pukko a few years ago from my secret Santa gift.

Pete
 

Phil Pascoe

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According to National Geographic.

Male, or bull, moose grow their antlers each year through the spring and summer. Female moose, called cows, don’t grow antlers. But males’ impressive headgear is made of bone that is an extension of the skull. When they first form, antlers are covered with a layer of skin called velvet, which nourishes the bone as it grows. When finished, the velvet sheds off, a process that the moose often accelerate by rubbing on trees.
 

Rorschach

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I've worked with Deer antler and it seems very bone like, certainly nothing like the various types of horn I have used.

There is a core inside that looks very much like marrow and the outside is very hard and doesn't delaminate like horn.

Aside from the smell it's quite nice to work with though, in fact most of the bone, horn and Ivory I have used is nice to work with, the only thing I didn't like was working with teeth.
 

MikeG.

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Bandsaws are used by butchers constantly, for sawing through bones etc. I doubt a bone would be any sort of issue for an M42 blade.
My gast is thoroughly flabbered that moose antler contains bone.
 

TFrench

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According to wikipedia all deer antler are bones, other animals like cows, sheep and goats are keratin. Every day is a school day.

Our dog has antler to chew, they last much longer than other chews or bones. Unfotunately the latest one was particularly big and was damaging the floor when he dropped it so I stuck it through the bandsaw. Worked fine, no obvious change to the blade.
 

Suffolkboy

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I stalk deer for a living.

All antler is most certainly bone. Amazing to thing that they cast them annually and then regrow them in the space of a couple of months. The next time you see a picture of a gert red stag just think that that bone weighs more than the bone in your legs and it took him two or three months to grow it.

I have provided antler in velvet for stem cell research in the past.

Horn is Keratin, most horned animals don't shed their horns, the only exception I am aware of is the pronghorned antelope. But I don't deal with many horned animals so happy to be corrected on that.

I have cut heaps of antler on a bandsaw. Making beads and keyings and coat hangers etc etc etc. It does smell if it get hot but you get used to it.

As it's round, and inevitably not straight just make sure that you have the antler well secured and braced against the table, the same as you might if you were processing logs or resawing or whatever. Basic bandsaw safety type stuff.

I can tell you from experience if you have been up since 02:30 and decide that afternoon is a good time to sleepily saw up some antler you soon. wake up when you get that sickening bang as the saw grabs the piece you haven't fed correctly. Luckily for me it just bent the blade and didn't remove any of my digits.
 
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