• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Can Anyone Identify This Plant?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Scouse

Established Member
Joined
3 Aug 2009
Messages
738
Reaction score
0
Location
Just North of Liverpool
It's just come up this year, wasn't there last. The wife's the gardener, but swears she didn't plant this. It's an odd looking thing, freaks me out to be honest! It's about 5 foot high and each big head is made up of smaller spheres each with lots of what look like small green flowers. The stem is fibrous, not woody.



Any help gratefully received

El.
 

woodbutcher2

Member
Joined
6 Jul 2011
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
I am almost certain your plant is Angelica . My wife has been growing them for several seasons.
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,027
Reaction score
498
Location
Bristol
It grows wild in Iceland - maybe the seeds blew in along with the dust cloud!
 

DrPhill

Cyber Heretic
Joined
15 Feb 2012
Messages
900
Reaction score
26
Location
West Somerset
Be a little careful identifying umbellifers (the generic name of the family) as some umbellifers are responsible for most of the plant poisonings in this country.

Other possible identities for the plant include lovage, sweet cicely, alexanders, and poison hemlock....... I think water dropwort is unlikely

Properly identified the benign ones are wonderful culinary additions.
 

dickm

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2004
Messages
4,653
Reaction score
58
Location
North of Aberdeen
DrPhill":1c3944ss said:
Be a little careful identifying umbellifers (the generic name of the family) as some umbellifers are responsible for most of the plant poisonings in this country.
.... until, of course, the taxonomists decided they weren't umbellifers any more, but Apiacae! Still just as poisonous though :(
My candidate would be wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), going by the leaf shape.
 

Jonzjob

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
19 Mar 2007
Messages
5,179
Reaction score
200
Location
Ex nr Carcassonne, France. Now Corston Malmesbury
What does it taste like? :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

NO! Don't even think about it until it's bin identified properly!!!

One of the things over here is that all of the pharmasists are trained in the different fungi and if/when you find one that you don't know if it's edible or poisonous you take along to them and they will identify it for you. Some very strange and tasty jobbies too that would never get eaten in the U.K.
 

DrPhill

Cyber Heretic
Joined
15 Feb 2012
Messages
900
Reaction score
26
Location
West Somerset
I would counsel caution. Though a great fan of 'Food For Free' and a regular eater of wild plants I would never eat a wild umbellifer (apiaceae is such an ugly word to say, though it is, for now, more technically correct). I would treat a visitor to my garden with the same wariness. The differences in appearance between the various species can be tiny compared to the differences between their toxicities.
 

dickm

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2004
Messages
4,653
Reaction score
58
Location
North of Aberdeen
DrPhill":33qbkrdp said:
I would never eat a wild umbellifer (apiaceae is such an ugly word to say, though it is, for now, more technically correct)..
.... agreed wholeheartedly. And what do we now call the flower heads (the umbels)? Are they now APIES? Apes? Apia???

DNA analysis has a lot to answer for.
 

Latest posts

Top