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nev

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i have a walnut bowl blank that ,after the wax was turned off, i discovered a crack/split on the centre line :( so i cut it in two (12 o'clock to 6 o'clock) and obtained 4 pen blanks from the centre and two (slightly less than) semi-circular pieces. i would like to use these 2 semi-circular bits with a contrasting wood (oak) insert to remake the bowl blank.
now with the oak, i love the side grain, hate the end grain, so would like as much side grain or as little end grain showing as possible.
so the question is - if i know how thick i want the side of the (finished) bowl is there a way of chopping/ stacking or aligning the oak bits so that the inside and outside and inside bottom of the bowl will be mainly side grain?:?
 

adidat

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i think this is what your suggesting, the chocolate colour is the walnut, and the light brown bits are oak.

if stuck together with the grain going the same ways as the arrow you should obtain your goal,

i think

adidat

edit: thought i read somewhere that you where planning to use 2 pieces of oak but its not really a problem either way, just pretend the line in the middle isnt there
 

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nev

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adidat":wkfpvurn said:
i think this is what your suggesting, the chocolate colour is the walnut, and the light brown bits are oak.

if stuck together with the grain going the same ways as the arrow you should obtain your goal,

i think

adidat

edit: thought i read somewhere that you where planning to use 2 pieces of oak but its not really a problem either way, just pretend the line in the middle isnt there
thats it! simples! sometimes i amaze myself over-thinking things :oops: i was thinking about all sorts of angles and stuff when as you show in your drawing is simply a case of hiding the end grain between the two walnut bits #-o
cheers :D
 

adidat

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yere thinking about it if your wood is similar to how i drew it, you wont see much oak end grain.

adidat
 

Chrispy

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But will it stay stuck? end grain glue lines, opposing grain directions restricting movement, looks likely to fail over time IMO.
 

CHJ

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Chrispy":3q8m5wyy said:
But will it stay stuck? end grain glue lines, opposing grain directions restricting movement, looks likely to fail over time IMO.
If wood is well seasoned and well down the moisture curve (8% or less * ) before use then a good adhesive should get away with it.
PVA may show enough creep to be able to feel the joins after a while but something like Cascamite should not move or fail.
Allow time for any glue up to re-acclimatise and loose the adhesive moisture before turning.
If the item is well sealed and finished then any locality induced moisture intake should be reduced.

I glue up mixed grain orientations regularly and have never had any still in my possession fail, neither have I had any feedback about failures.

* If in doubt and you don't have a moisture meter, put wood in plastic bag in microwave on low for a couple of mins, and see if moisture is formed in bag.
If it is, turn bag inside out and repeat until no more is seen. Do not heat wood beyond Warm, do not leave the appliance un-attended, burnt wood odour is hard to remove from the appliance.
 

nev

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CHJ":3pvtlxw0 said:
Chrispy":3pvtlxw0 said:
But will it stay stuck? end grain glue lines, opposing grain directions restricting movement, looks likely to fail over time IMO.
If wood is well seasoned and well down the moisture curve (8% or less * )
the oak is joinery offcuts so should probably be dry, the walnut a shop bought blank. i dont have a meter so i will try the microwave method later.

as for glue, i have in my possession PVA, Gator glue (PU?) 2 pack epoxy (new, havent tried it yet), and old tin of evostik contact adhesive and various CA supaglues.
i was going to opt for either the gator glue (http://www.google.co.uk/products/catalo ... CGIQ8wIwAQ) because it expands slightly on curing, or the PVA cos it dries nice and clear.
once i'm done micro-waving i shall glue up a few test pieces and see what the result is.
thanks for the input guys :)
 

jumps

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if it was me it would be the epoxy - and a lot of clamping!

there shouldn't be anywhere for an expanding glue (PU) to go, other than putting pressure on your clamps

don't rush it and glue the oak first with one end hard up against a straight edge; the other may then be 'refinished' if needed before adding walnut. Again, one piece at a time will get a better clamp on the first piece added - you just have to do the best you can with the last.

Titebond should also be effective and seems to react well to pressure when setting.
 
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