Cadbury's Boost Timber

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Lonsdale73

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2015
Messages
1,433
Reaction score
116
Location
County Durham
It's about four years since I started getting into woodwork. I think I've said before that I'm a photographer and the original idea was to create my own mouldings for photo frames.

Early on in my woodworking adventure, those dark days afore I found forums and the endless hours of woodworking porn on youtube, I had a very special client with a very special birthday coming up and I wanted to combine my interests to produce something a bit nice to recognise their milestone and reward their ongoing support. Hitherto, I'd worked almost exclusively from whatever they had stocked at my local B&Q which wasn't much! I did regularly pass somewhere that on closer inspection tuned out to be a timber merchant. So on one trip, I made a point of calling in by. It was about 4pm and I was greeted with "We close at half-past!". I explained the situation and said I was looking for some thinnish timber (approx 6-9mm), something a bit nicer than softwood, from which I could produce a nice box-cum-photo frame type thingy.

"I've got this" he said although he wasn't quite sure exactly what "this" actually was. One thing even my untrained eye could tell was it was significantly thicker than 6-9mm! "No problem," he assured me, "I can have it cut in half for you then you'll have twice as much to work with."


It measured about 1m long and he wanted £20 for it. That seemed rather a lot for one smallish piece of wood but then I was only able to compare with the limited offerings so I accepted. He took it off to slice it in half(ish) and I took i back to my fledgling work shop. This is what I found:

Rippled.jpg


What was I supposed to do with that? It was a thoroughly disappointing experience and I've been back once - more out of desperation - and things didn't look a whole lot better. Wasn't even a soul about, good job I'm not the light-fingered type.

I didn't realise I still had this bit. I'd tried salvaging the other piece by sanding it down; it killed my old Bosch sander and made a mockery of a Ryobi One+ 'mouse' sander that I think came free with my drill and I think the piece was ultimately sacrificed to the gods of wood.

Anyway, I took delivery of a Triton TPT125 Thicknesser today and figured this might as well be used to test it out. It was already a bit too thin for the Triton's minimum thickness so I hot-melt glued it to a length of 18mm MDF to raise it up a bit and this is what I got:

smoother.jpg


Still not perfect, you can still see some rippling in it but I didn't want to take it any thinner to be left with a sheet of papyrus.

Oh yes, and the point of this post, something that occurred to me earlier and somehow seems common sense but thought I'd ask: Should you ALWAYS plane / thickness with the grain?
 

Attachments

  • Rippled.jpg
    Rippled.jpg
    255.3 KB · Views: 136
  • smoother.jpg
    smoother.jpg
    179.8 KB · Views: 136

paulrockliffe

Established Member
Joined
10 Nov 2014
Messages
381
Reaction score
1
Location
Durham
It matters less whether you go with the grain on the thicknesser because it's taking tiny scallops rather than one long cut, I often put stuff through either way and it doesn't seem to make any difference to the finish.
 

RobinBHM

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2011
Messages
7,211
Reaction score
1,395
Location
Wst Sussex
It looks like American White Ash to me, which is a quite hard timber.

It can make a difference if you plane agsinst the grain, you are likely to get torn grain. However until a piece has been through once its not easy to know.

Thicknessers, being power fed machine consistently so will often produce quite a decent finish against the grain.
 

Latest posts

Top