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Cabinets below ceiling height

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Mjward

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Hello

My plan is to build bookcases/cabinets that with trim will be flush with ceiling height.

I noticed in my kitchen and as per pic below, the previous carpenter has left a gap. Is this one of those necessary expansion gaps or am I over thinking and most likely he assembled generic height units that didn't quite make it to full height?
20220122_080512.jpg
 

RobinBHM

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Ceilings are rarely level or flat, so if a cornice went up the the ceiling it would leave a varying gap - so it’s better to set down 50mm or so, that way the eye doesn’t read it.




you can scribe some flat mdf set back to close off the gap if you want
 

Mjward

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Ceilings are rarely level or flat, so if a cornice went up the the ceiling it would leave a varying gap - so it’s better to set down 50mm or so, that way the eye doesn’t read it.




you can scribe some flat mdf set back to close off the gap if you want
Ah ok that makes a lot of sense. It's a fairly new ceiling so would hope it's flat but I guess for kitchen fitters it may not be worth the time to scribe a flush fit when an offset will do in most cases. Thanks for your speedy response!
 

Distinterior

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The problem with doing what the fitters have done in your picture, ...Leaving a small gap like that creates a dust trap that is nigh on impossible to get in to clean.

Ideally, they should have fitted a scribe panel behind the Cornice & up to the ceiling to seal the gap.
 

Mjward

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The dust trap is exactly the angle I was thinking of when originally think about what height to take cabinets to. I didn't get the logic of making it just below but obviously the scribe and ceiling issue is the primary reason.

I'm not (currently) looking to change the kitchen ones pictured, was more just to know if there was a good reason why I should take cabinets/bookcases to full height when I attack other rooms but sounds like I'm good to go
 

Ollie78

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It's a fairly new ceiling so would hope it's flat.

Don't kid yourself, it won't be.
Even if it is flat, will it be coplanar with the floor and perpendicular to the walls ? Nope.

Leave a decent amount of gap and do a scribed trim of some kind. Or a shadow gap, sometimes a gap is neater looking than a scribe. This is why the kitchen fitters have done it like that, it can look really bad if scribing a fat cornice.

Ollie
 
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Jacob

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It's either built in and will fill the space as much or as little as desired, or it's mobile - not built in - and there will be gaps.
 

Terry - Somerset

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Probably a heresy.

If the intention were to have a "shadow" gap and avoid the dust trap, foam or polystyrene would compress to compensate for variations in gap rather than a scribed woody solution. Very quick!

It would not be visible from normal eye level (unless very tall or very low ceilings!
 

Droogs

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Have you considered having a gap but behind it have a MDF strip secured to the ceiling and have LED light tape attached to it with a frosted cover that will fill the gap and prevent dust build up. Then you make the gap a design feature which provides indirect ambient lighting. Choose the right temp and colour and it is very inviting.


1642939343772.png
 

Ollie78

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The problem with doing what the fitters have done in your picture, ...Leaving a small gap like that creates a dust trap that is nigh on impossible to get in to clean.

This is for the spiders to live in.


Have you considered having a gap but behind it have a MDF strip secured to the ceiling and have LED light tape attached to it with a frosted cover that will fill the gap and prevent dust build up. Then you make the gap a design feature which provides indirect ambient lighting. Choose the right temp and colour and it is very inviting.


View attachment 127676

This will provide a wonderful raking light accross the ceiling so you can see every tiny imperfection in it with extra clarity.
Just like plinth lighting demonstrating with pinpoint accuracy the dustyness of the floor.

Ollie
 

Droogs

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not really if you diffuse the light with a frosted cover, think bathroom window daylight across the ceiling gives light but not rakish. This stuff cut to fit

 

Distinterior

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Back/Uplighting can be quite effective, depending on the situation.

This was a kitchen I made & fitted about 3 years ago. Slightly different as it was above an Island, but the principle is the same.

Pictures show it with the lights on and off.....

20200811_165912.jpg


20200811_165607.jpg
 

Mjward

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Thanks all, a lot of good ideas.

Re LED lighting I'm incorporating that in a few other rooms with a dropped ceiling in cinema room and LED around the perimeter as well as LED strips in the lounge shelving.
 
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