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paulc

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Happy New Year to all, back for some more advice after a long time away from the workbench, want to buy a good selection of wood from a local lumber yard and dealers not to interested in offering advice as he knows the order will be relatively small, anyway each wood type is followed by initials such as SAPS or PRIME or SPECIAL DRIED or FAS can anyone enlighten me as to waht these letters mean. Thanks a million.
 

JFC

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Hi Paul i assume your in the states as you said lumber yard and i've never heard of those terms , But i can take a guess for you :D
Prime = best stuff
Special dried = Air dried or kiln dried
FAS= Finished as standard , maybe like CLS the timber size is regulized but not PAR (Prepared)
SAPS = Sawn and prepared standard (finished timber)
Im only guessing but knowing a little timber terminology its the best i can do .
 

OPJ

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I've been doing a bit of Googling on this and came up with the very same answers for the first two.

But for FAS and SPAS... Sometimes, computers really baffle me!

I came up with something about importing timber or being structural for the FAS and again, Structural Adjusting Policies for SAPS.

I'd be surprised to learn you are wrong though, the answer's are often fairly simple with these kind of things, so there you go. :D
 

JFC

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FAS could be a structual thing in the states as ive heard its finished as standard to take the fir off the timber so its not a fire risk . But thats hearsay from a non reliable source ( a salesman ) :lol:
I didnt think along the structual line so ill have a rethink .
 

mr

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Could be 'orribly orf centre here but I seem to recall FAS stands for first and second referring to quality, no doubt though someone will be long to set me right shortly. Spas - place for a relaxing weekend? Bath is nice.

edit

The grade of a piece of timber is determined by the number and size of possible cuttings. Higher grades have fewer, larger cuttings and a higher percentage of clear (defect free) timber. For the higher grades, the grade is determined from the worst face of the piece (an exception is FAS1F). In general, the grades define the poorest pieces acceptable in a grade. Hence a parcel of timber consists of pieces ranging from this minimum up to the definition for the next highest grade. In the case of Firsts in Firsts and Seconds (FAS), the top limit is defect free material.

In addition to fuller and more precise definitions of cuttings, the rules define, and give limits to, standards of manufacture (edging, trimming, variations in thickness); standard lengths, thicknesses and minimum widths; measurement and tally; distortion, wane and shake. ‘Standard’ and equivalent defects are also defined for certain grades which are established on a ‘defect basis’ rather than the cutting system. However, this alternative grading basis is rarely seen in timber exported to the UK.

The traditional standard grades are as follows, in descending order of quality:
Firsts
Seconds
Selects
No. 1 Common
No. 2 Common
 

Chris Knight

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Hardwood Lumber Grading

FAS - Highest grade in hardwood lumber. FAS graded boards must be at least 6" wide and 8" long. FAS boards have to yield 83 1/3% in the defined clear face cuttings. FAS graded wood is commonly used for molding and millwork.

1C - Number 1 common is the "cutting" grade of hardwood lumber, often used in furniture and cabinetry. Number 1 common boards must yield 66 2/3% in the designated clear face cuttings.

2C - Number 2 common boards must yield 50% in the designated cuttings. In 2A grade, cuttings must be clear; 2B grade allows sound (tight knots etc.) cuttings. #2 grades are often used in cabinets, flooring and some furniture.

3A - Another hardwood grade used primarily in flooring, furniture frames and pallets. 3A must yield 33 1/3% in the designated cuttings.

2C and Better - the entire grade mix of all Number 2 common and FAS the log will yield.

WHAD - Worm holes with a defect

WHND - Worm holes (unlimited) no defect

Hardwood Lumber Sizes

4/4 - 1" thick.

5/4 - 1 1/4" thick.

6/4 - 1 1/2" thick.

8/4 - 2" thick

Softwood Lumber Grades

No. 1 (Construction) - Moderate-sized tight knots. Takes paint well. Often used for cornice, paneling, siding, shelving, and some furniture.

No. 2 (Standard) - Knots are larger and more numerous. Takes paint reasonably well and has uses similar to No. 1.

No. 3 (Utility) - Splits and knotholes present. Does not paint well. Used for crates, sheathing, subflooring and small (usually hidden) furniture parts.

No. 4 (Economy) - Numerous splits, knotholes and large waste areas. Does not take paint well and often relegated to sheathing, subflooring and concrete form work.

No. 5 (Economy) - Larger waste areas and coarser defects. Does not take paint and has applications similar to No. 5.
 

paulc

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Cheers for all the information, should help me in persuading the owner to let me have a roam around and pick out the best pieces at the right price - he wasn't to keen on the idea of a small pick n mix order , but the yard has the best selection of wood that this novice is yet to see in Dublin so a little bit of extra knowledge should help me twist his arm and know what I'm looking at. If anyone on the forum is from Dublin(Ireland) or near enough and knows of another good wood supplier please let me know . The one referred to above is www.abbeywoods.ie. Thanks again.
 

frank

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paul as with all wood yards try and go in the afternoon when the tradesmen have been and gone if the yard is anygood they will explain the different woods if you ask them .i go and look at the wood before i buy it if they wont let you go some place else .

frank
 
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