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Buying Advice - Stanley Compressor From Screwfix

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diyphil

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Hi All
Does anyone have any thoughts on the 50l, 2.5hp Stanley FCDV4G45CR006 compressor that Screwfix are currently selling for £219.99 or the Scheppach HC53DC 50l for £299.98.
Stanley Compressor / Scheppach Compressor
Does anyone own one of these. Are they reliable and value for money?
Any advice would be gratefully received as I have never owned a compressor before.
Phil
 
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porker

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I have one similar to the Stanley you linked to. I also have a smaller 12L one that I use mainly for a nail gun as it is more portable. Had it for 25 years and still works OK. Big question is what do you want to use it for? The number that matters when driving air tools is the CFM - how much air they can deliver. This will determine which tools it will drive. The size of the receiver is also important and will determine how quickly it gets up to pressure and how long you can use a tool before it cycles to refill ie. restart the motor.
Be aware that this type are noisy - very. I don't know whether the second type is as noisy, but it is something that annoys me. Belt driven compressors tend to be quieter.
The other thing to be aware of is that the tanks need the moisture draining regularly from a stop cock at the bottom of the tank. You need to do this if you don't want the receiver to rot out after a number of years.
There is a load of other stuff to be aware of if you want to spray for example like removing moisture and oil from the air supply, quick coupling types etc.
 

novocaine

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Noise will be around 85dB.
Will run most tools and let you spray.
Budget for a new regulator. Whats on there now is cheapest of the cheap and whats fitted to almost all consumer grade compressors with cheap sintered powder block.
Other than that,its a reciprocating air pump with little to go wrong assuming you keep an eye on lubricants and moisture. They have a thin plate valve arrangement that will fail eventually
Edit: closer to 92dB. Thats above allowable lomits for 8 hour but fine for short bursts like a compressor
 
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novocaine

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Quick look says stanley free air cfm is 8.8 and the schpfugufjelrjs is 9.2. Nit much difference for the extra complication of twin cylinder.

Other option.

Also just seen that SGS do the same compressor with a starter kit for 150 notes.
 
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diyphil

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Thanks for the info Porker.
From my research over the last few days I realise that the CFM that most compressor manufacturers quote is the amount of air that the compressor draws in and not the amount that reaches the tool. I believe that the free air delivery (FAD) is the air that reaches the tool after all the resistance of the compressor motor, the air line, the couplings and the tool has taken place. Both the Stanley and Scheppach quote FAD figures of 250l/m (8.8 CFM) and 272l/m (9.6CFM) respectively.
I would like to use the compressor to spray my woodworking projects. I have been watching the YouTube videos from Lowes Joinery in which he uses a LVLP (low volume low low pressure) spray gun. I believe these guns operate below 5 or 6 CFM so both compressors should provide enough air. I am limited for space so a 50l tank is the largest compressor I can fit in my garage. I don't know how long the tank will last before the compressor kicks in to top it up, but as I will be spraying water based primer and satin wood paint I don't think it would be a problem to stop spraying for a minute to wait for the tank to refill if this is required.
I still have to learn about removing the moisture / oil from the air line and what equipment is best. I believe I will have to use an air regulator as well to reduce the pressure for the gun to work efficiently. I also need to find out what bore of hose to buy - they seem to vary from 6mm to 10mm bores.
Phil
 

diyphil

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Thanks for your advice novocaine. I assume the SGS SC50H 9.6CFM would reduce to approx 6CFM FAD which may be getting a bit low. I did look at the SGS SC50V at 14.6CFM (approx 9CFM FAD?) for £180, but they have sold out so it is no longer available.
I also now see that my choice of the Stanley is not in stock at Screwfix right now!
Phil
 

novocaine

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Manual say delivery not intake at 9.6cfm. Its the same size cylinder and receiver as the stanley so 9.6cfm seems about right.

For 100 quid less it seems a no brainer to me.
 

diyphil

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Thanks for pointing that out novocaine. I hadn't looked at the SGS manual and assumed that the 9.6CFM was not the FAD figure. It does make it look good value. Cheers.
 

porker

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It should be fine for spraying but thats one thing I've not done with mine as I have a HVLP sprayer. Others can advise the setup that will work best (y)
 

diyphil

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Hi Novocaine
I sent a query to SGS and have just had a message back to say FAD is approx 2/3 of the quoted CFM, so I have to assume that the delivery figure in the manual is in fact not the FAD figure. In this case I will have to rule out the SGS SC50H compressor. This appears to be a minefield but I do appreciate your help.
Phil
 

Lockyear2810

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If you can get a belt driven twin cylinder compressor, then get one.
They tend to run slower and although the dB level is still high it is a much less annoying sound.
I have a small direct drive unit and it is very very loud if you are in the same room.
 

Lazurus

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I think the main question here is what are you intending to use it for, if it is for air tools, plasma cutter, or sand blaster they will both struggle. If it is for general use tyres, cleaning small air tools either would be fine. 50l is a small receiver for most jobs whch will mean after the initial use the pumps may struggle to keep up with demand.

So the question is what is the CFM requirements of what you intend to use it for?
 

novocaine

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Hi Novocaine
I sent a query to SGS and have just had a message back to say FAD is approx 2/3 of the quoted CFM, so I have to assume that the delivery figure in the manual is in fact not the FAD figure. In this case I will have to rule out the SGS SC50H compressor. This appears to be a minefield but I do appreciate your help.
Phil
I hate when companies do this. SGS used to be really good qouting specs etc. shame they seem to have gone the way of all the others.
sorry for the bum steer.
 

Ollie78

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Get the biggest tank you can.
I have a NU Air compressor and it is very nice, I used to have a Clarke one from machine mart which was OK but not as nice. Saying that, Machine mart do have a large range if you want to go and have a browse at some.

I would also say that the fittings matter as well, I have a kremlin sprayer and you have to use the fatter "euro" style high flow connectors.

Over spec it on the cfm if you can, its the principle of headroom. Like driving a small engined car at 70 mph it is struggling and using all its capacity but a big v8 is just ticking over at that speed.

Ollie
 
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