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Buying a Tracksaw

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angelboy

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Certainly - I did know its limitations, but I wanted the saw for other purposes.

There'll be a difference between where the blade sits and the nylon guide ...

No, it sits in the same place. The guide has to be trimmed to suit the blade.
It's OK that you were aware of the limitations by not using the circular saw that's designed to be used with the track, and for your specific purpose then that's fine, but I don't think it's best to give advice to confuse others that might not be aware of those limitations.

Even the manufacturer says that the CCS isn't compatible with the track...........but who am I to argue with the people that designed and manufactured it.......?!?

Screen Shot 2021-06-16 at 13.39.42.png
 

Filament

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No need to go 3mm - on a flat cutting table most sheet materials I find I can get away with 1mm, with plywood requiring 2mm as it is never truly flat.


According to the COSHH sheets, European MDF isn't toxic at all, and hasn't been since about 1995 when the E1 standard was introduced. AFAIK that effectively ended the use of resins containing formaldehyde on the production of MDF.

@petermillard did a YouTube video about MDF toxicity which you might find of interest

You do well to wear a mask, but is your mask up to it? At work (construction) we mandate the use of face-fitted P3 masks when cutting MDF, chipboard and plywood together with an L-class or M-class vacuum depending on what is being cut.

In a home environment you obviously won't be able to do a full face fit test (which requires a test rig and a trained tester) but if you are relatively clean shaven you could opt for a JSP Force 8 mask with P3 filters (AFAIK the only mask to feature a seal self test facility), or if you are whiskered then the obvious choice would be an air cap or air helmet of some description which blows filtetedcair down over the face (but can be a bit cold in winter), again with P3 filters. In terms of vacuums, most home vacuums or shop vacs aren't up to the task of filtering MDF dust, but if you can't run to an M-class vacuum, you can get near to the same effect by fitting a pre-filter cyclone between your tool and the shop vac


It depends. About 20 years ago the OSHA in the USA did some research which concluded that the dust from western red cedar is carcinogenic...

And whilst it may or may not be carcinogenic, the formaldehyde in softwoods as well as the resins can lead to a form of allergic rhinitis - something I know about from first hand experiencr
Have you been snooping in my shed? :) Funnily enough, I use a Force 8 Mask (stubble but does seal) and have done what I suppose you could describe as a 'redneck fit test' using Bitrex (the chemical used in most commercial fit tests) fine-sprayed in a confined space (downstairs loo) which worked well enough to tell which disposable P3 masks fitted well and which didn't. I use a cyclone before a Titan shop vac with a HEPA filter (though, just seen that Screwfix have stopped stocking them which is annoying) and plan to upgrade when I can (though do cut outdoors when possible, not least because the shed is tiny.)
Thanks for a great reply
 

Spectric

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It gives a solid base and pine is one of the least bad dusts (as far as I can tell from the reading I did, but perfectly happy to have someone tell me I'm wrong)
I really hate MDF dust, it is really awfull and I can understand why people who use the stuff are so obsessed with extraction, it must also create an explosive atmosphere if not kept under control so a very good reason to minimise its use unless you have no alternatives but for me Birch ply is a better choice even with the cost.
 

JobandKnock

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...it must also create an explosive atmosphere if not kept under control so a very good reason to minimise its use unless you have no alternatives but for me Birch ply is a better choice even with the cost.
Oddly enough, no - the damned stuff doesn't burn well! It apparently takes a huge volume of it mixed with air to create what is called a "stochiometrically viable compound" (the HSE's term for it - had to look that one up) which can combust in the presence of a flame or spark, and even then it rarely happens. Apparently dust extraction fires with MDF aren't all that common and are more down to sparking (e.g. screw striking metal ductwork on the way to the extractor) or smouldering (hit metal such as broken tool bit picked up and deposited in the waste drop box of the extractor, or the inside of a vacuum cleaner, which is left there at end if day rather than being put outside). That's why but I still follow the advice to empty my vacuum bag at the end of the day just in case I've picked up a hot piece of metal (we sometimes have grinding and welding going on near us)
 
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angelboy

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The manufacturers track box says it is. I have emailed Powertoolword and they are looking into it - they replied to me in ONE minute.
Did you get a response from Powertool World Phil?

I found my box that was delivered which shows the compatible models if that helps you.

evolution box.JPG
 

Spectric

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Oddly enough, no - the damned stuff doesn't burn well
So is that a positive or a negative, if it burned then it has a use as fuel but because it does not then it avoids ATEX unlike most fine wood dust, coal dust and flour. But if you fill your lungs with water you drown, so technically you could drown in MDF dust!
 

JobandKnock

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Well, we did used to burn it in a Talbot wood burner, but it must be mixed I with wood waste, so maybe I should have said that it doesn't ignite readily. Once it's burning it can keep going (a bit like diesel)

Biggest issue with it is that the dust is very fine which can make it an irritant and it will clog your lungs up
 

Phil Pascoe

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Did you get a response from Powertool World Phil?

I found my box that was delivered which shows the compatible models if that helps you.

View attachment 112387
The outcome. I contacted Powertoolworld and showed a copy of that letter, and explained that I had had confirmation from someone at their end that the saw was compatible - I had proceeded to put the packaging in the recycling. The lady said it was a pity I'd ditched it, but they would send a return label and they'd do a refund on it. I said I was quite happy to buy the other saw, so I could use that packaging and she agreed. It went back and I was credited. I've used the new one and though I have nothing to compare it to I can't fault it - I can work full sheets from a wheelchair. A bit of a clusterfu**, really, but it worked out in the end.

So ........... if you're looking for powertools, https://www.powertoolworld.co.uk/ are worth a look - good firm to deal with.
 

angelboy

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The outcome. I contacted Powertoolworld and showed a copy of that letter, and explained that I had had confirmation from someone at their end that the saw was compatible - I had proceeded to put the packaging in the recycling. The lady said it was a pity I'd ditched it, but they would send a return label and they'd do a refund on it. I said I was quite happy to buy the other saw, so I could use that packaging and she agreed. It went back and I was credited. I've used the new one and though I have nothing to compare it to I can't fault it - I can work full sheets from a wheelchair. A bit of a clusterfu**, really, but it worked out in the end.

So ........... if you're looking for powertools, https://www.powertoolworld.co.uk/ are worth a look - good firm to deal with.
A great outcome Phil! I’m pleased that you’ve got the best saw for the track because it’s great to use.
 

johnnyb

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today I tried a lumberjack 32t blade and first impressions were really good. it plunged really easily and cut very freely. also I much prefer fewer teeth for general use as it much freer cutting and feels safer plunging.. I've never tried an 80t but I've got a negative rake freud that's slightly dicey to plunge.
 

JobandKnock

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80t is way too many teeth for a small diameter saw blade cutting sheet material - likely to clog quickly as the gullets are small
 
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