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Filament

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Good choice sir!
Tool stop have the saw for £280 and track for £54.


What sort of price are you after?
In terms of other track, it’ll work with most but you won’t be able to use the anti-tip feature (useful when making bevel cuts) as that’s unique to Makita and their rails have a little lip to accommodate it.

(Equally I think the lip in question does prevent the uses of some of the festool track accessories if you ever want to use them)
Peter Millard has a video about track options
 

JobandKnock

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From memory, the Makita 'scoring' facility has a niggle, a slight offset relative to main cut. From @Spectric table - not much to choose DeWalt/Makita?
Equally, scoring doesn't seem to score high on any of the reviews?
Never mind the reviews. Do you own a Makita and have you tried doing a scoring cut?

TBH I haven't used the scoring facility very much, but basically the method I use doesn't tilt the blade, but allows me to make a 2mm deep cut by pulling out the stop, moving the saw to the far end of the rail (unplunged), turning on, plunging into the material and pulling the saw backwards across the material to the beginning of the rail. This is much like the way a pre scoring blade works on a £10k sliding carriage panel saw (and it isn't quite how Makita say how to do it). Providing you clamp the guide rails to the material, this works well enough, but if you don't clamp the rail it can move. I've used it to make clean cuts on splintery (on cross cuts) birch plywood with my DSP600 on a good two dozen occasions in the last 6 weeks (for shadow gap cladding in birch ply where a clean edge was essential), so I'm not sure where your "niggle" comes from, although I do tend to be sceptical of reviews in general because it can take some time to learn about any power tool

Let's face it, though a scoring facility won't often figure highly in the list of reasons to buy one of these saws, will it? Hell, I had to look up in the manual how to set the 2mm depth last time because I do it so infrequently and so had forgotten how to do it (although TBH in my defence I do use about 6 different saws fairly regularly)

...Equally I think the lip in question does prevent the uses of some of the festool track accessories if you ever want to use them...
It also precludes use of Makita rails with the larger Festool TS75, but as that's really a bit of a specialist tool I doubt it will bother many folk
 
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Starjump

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Never mind the reviews. Do you own a Makita and have you tried doing a scoring cut?

TBH I haven't used the scoring facility very much, but basically the method I use doesn't tilt the blade, but allows me to make a 2mm deep cut, pulling the saw backwards across the material. Providing you clamp the guide rails to the material this works well. I've used it to make clean cuts on splintery birch plywood with my DSP600 on a good two dozen occasions in the last 6 weeks (for shadow gap cladding on birch ply where a clean edge is essential), so I'm not sure where your "niggle" comes from, although I do tend to be sceptical of reviews in general because it can take some time to learn about any power tool

Let's face it, though a scoring facility won't often figure highly in the list of reasons to buy one of these saws, will it?


It also precludes use of Makita rails with the larger Festool TS75, but as that's really a bit of a specialist tool I doubt it will bother many folk
My experience is limited to the TS75 from Festool. It is an unwieldy machine in that it is a big beast - quite heavy. But, once on the Festool track, it is powerful and accurate and easy to use, I particularly like the depth adjustment. I initially bought it thinking, (wrongly), that I wouldn't need other saws and plumped for the TS75 over the TS55 for the 75mm depth of cut. Of course I am still trying to work out what combination of machinery and power tools will work for me, and still unsure! I don't regret the purchase of the TS75 though. The accuracy of a good tracksaw for breaking down sheet goods is a pleasure in itself. It is a bit big though. It is very good for taking a waney edge off of a plank of hardwood with a suitable blade for ripping and yet it can leave a fine, clean cut on birch ply with a laminate type blade on it. I have used it as my only track saw for years and it has served me very well. But as JobandKnock alludes to, it is probably not the first choice machine: live and learn!

Today I received delivery of a Makita 36v plunge saw, the DHS680Z. I understand that it will share the Festool tracks, which is why I bought it. I previously used a little Makita 18v handheld and was blown away by the quality of the cut with the Makita 'efficut' blade installed, so I plumped for plunge saw from the Makita range with said blade. Having the second, smaller and lighter weight, plunge saw to share the Festool rails alongside the TS75, was my plan.

In the last few minutes I have opened the Makita Macpac box and plonked the new machine onto a Festool guide rail (track). Problem - the Makita with it's lovely thin-kerf 'efficut' blade installed plunges onto the splinter guard, the offset is different between the two saws. Oh no! I have adjusted the Makita to glide nicely on the rail, to remove play but not so much as to make the saw bind on the rail. I think the difference is about a millimetre, the blade being closer to the guide rail on the Makita.

The 36v Makita is a lovely bit of kit from what I can tell in the few minutes I have owned it!

Hope my experiences are a bit of help. This is a very informative thread.
 

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JobandKnock

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I bought the TS75 specifically to handle heavy solid wood doors which we were renovating on one job. It has been used for a few other specific tasks (such as ripping down 5 metre long x 60mm thick sapele cappings which were delivered 20mm too wide, etc) but for general use I found it too big and too heavy for prolonged use

Today I received delivery of a Makita 36v plunge saw, the DHS680Z. I understand that it will share the Festool tracks, which is why I bought it. I previously used a little Makita 18v handheld and was blown away by the quality of the cut with the Makita 'efficut' blade installed, so I plumped for plunge saw from the Makita range with said blade. Having the second, smaller and lighter weight, plunge saw to share the Festool rails alongside the TS75, was my plan.

In the last few minutes I have opened the Makita Macpac box and plonked the new machine onto a Festool guide rail (track). Problem - the Makita with it's lovely thin-kerf 'efficut' blade installed plunges onto the splinter guard, the offset is different between the two saws. Oh no! I have adjusted the Makita to glide nicely on the rail, to remove play but not so much as to make the saw bind on the rail. I think the difference is about a millimetre, the blade being closer to the guide rail on the Makita.
You've hit the problem of there being no such thing as a standards between manufacturers, or even within a range (?), I'm afraid. Even with Festool the same problem used to exist with TS55 blades, with some having 2.2mm kerfs, others 2.4mm or 2.5mm.kerfs, etc. So change blades and you'd need to move the anti splinter strips, potentially. Festool sorted that out in the end (by adopting 2.2mm as the standard) but it took several phone calls to Festool (and a fair bit of trial and error adjustment) to fix the issue of the TS75 and the TS55 not tracking the same. When I introduced a DSP600 into the mix I ended up experimenting with paper and plastic shims beneath the blade to get the DSP to track the same as the Festools and a mate made me up a balanced HDPE shim so my saw would work on the Festool tracks (by pushing the blade out about, from memory, 1.5mm but zi wasn"t using the EfiCut blades and still don't as I find them expensive). But that all got undone when the Mak went back to them under warranty (and they removed the shim and presumably chucked it).

Sorry to say, but I ended up keeping a couple of rails for the TS75, the TS55 is now "in reserve" whilst the DSP600 has now got four shiny new Makita rails (3 x 1500 plus 1 x 1000mm)

Because the Makita isn't adjustable in the same way you might want to consider some DIY blade shims, or alternatively adjust the TS75 to match the DSP instead (the TS75 base has adjusters)
 
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Starjump

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I bought the TS75 specifically to handle heavy solid wood doors which we were renovating on one job. It has been used for a few other specific tasks (such as ripping down 5 metre long x 60mm thick sapele cappings which were delivered 20mm too wide, etc) but for general use I found it too big and too heavy for prolonged use


You've hit the problem of there being no such thing as a standards between manufacturers, or even within a range (?), I'm afraid. Even with Festool the same problem used to exist with TS55 blades, with some having 2.2mm kerfs, others 2.4mm or 2.5mm.kerfs, etc. So change blades and you'd need to move the anti splinter strips, potentially. Festool sorted that out in the end (by adopting 2.2mm as the standard) but it took several phone calls to Festool (and a fair bit of trial and error adjustment) to fix the issue of the TS75 and the TS55 not tracking the same. When I introduced a DSP600 into the mix I ended up experimenting with paper and plastic shims beneath the blade to get the DSP to track the same as the Festools and a mate made me up a balanced HDPE shim so my saw would work on the Festool tracks (by pushing the blade out about, from memory, 1.5mm). But that all got undone when the Mak went back to them under warranty (and they removed the shim and presumably chucked it).

Sorry to say, but I ended up keeping a couple of rails for the TS75, the TS55 is now "in reserve" whilst the DSP600 has now got four shiny new Makita rails (3 x 1500 plus 1 x 1000mm)

Because the Makita isn't adjustable in the same way you might want to consider some DIY blade shims, or alternatively adjust the TS75 to match the DSP instead (the TS75 base has adjusters)
Thank you for this - illuminating.

I expect the solutions you came up with will apply to me too. I am too in a fortunate position of having the 3 metre long rail, the TS75 is so good at long cuts whether full sheets or ripping hardwood, that I will copy your method of keeping a couple of rails for the TS75.

I have ordered a rail square with the intention of fitting it to a Festool rail and using it with an MFT style top for x-cuts, the Makita would work with this set-up, being more handy, so will probably experiment here. Looking forward to it actually!

Thank you for your help.
 

Spectric

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I have ordered a rail square with the intention of fitting it to a Festool rail and using it with an MFT style top for x-cuts, the Makita would work with this set-up, being more handy, so will probably experiment here. Looking forward to it actually!
What rail square ? and for doing repetative cuts you may want to look at parallel guides but at the moment I am content with my Makita track saw but a rail square is on the list.
 

Starjump

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What rail square ? and for doing repetative cuts you may want to look at parallel guides but at the moment I am content with my Makita track saw but a rail square is on the list.
Hi Spectric,
To recap I bought the Makita saw because it runs on the Festool rails which I already use. I ordered a 'Festool rail compatible' rail square from Benchdogs, this morning.

With your Makita track saw I expect you can get a rail square to fit the Makita rails if you consider it important or when the time comes.

Thank you for suggesting parallel guides, I have watched Peter Millard's excellent videos, but as yet it has not proved as high up the list of desirables as the need to x-cut at 90 degrees for example.

Hence it is now time to play a little and see what comes out of it. Thanks again.
 

Spectric

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With your Makita track saw I expect you can get a rail square to fit the Makita rails if you consider it important or when the time comes.
The Benchdog square is the one I am thinking of, having looked at what is out there it has a good price for the quality and it fits Festool and makita tracks because they are very similar apart from the Makita has those anti tipping lugs for when doing 45° cuts. Benchdogs are going to be selling a repetive stop attachment for it at some point.
 

monster

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Misses just bought me a 3m rail yesterday as a birthday present! lol - I was getting fed up joining the two shorter ones when breaking down large sheet material. Used it today to rip a sheet of ply into strips for wag tails and covers to close the weight boxes off on the sash windows I've just made. Nice not messing about joining the two, with the added benefit of removing the possibility of misalignment.
 

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Has anyone experience of this, I did see in a Pete Millard video this was an issue on I believe the Maefell but not seen it on the Makita.
No, pretty sure it’s unique to Mafell; the Makita - like all the others afaik - has a simple depth stop for the scoring cut; only the Mafell has the cutesie blade-shifting trick that didn’t work quite as planned on the one I had.
 

JobandKnock

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I have a 3m rail which is indeed a lot better for doing long cuts (e.g. trimming floor edges in situ, doing cut outs for electrical trays, etc) - but it's a pain to transport it about (it won't fit in my van!) and even moving it round on sit can be awkward, as is storing it safely so some muppet doesn't end up bending it.... So limited usability but very good when I do need it
 

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Sorry to pee on your fire but I think that you will find that B&Q have advertised that price but out of interest I looked and the item is not available for home delivery and even though I live near to one of the largest B&Q in the country it shows no stock and also no stock in any nearby store.
I have noticed this a lot with some of the big stores. I do not know if it is incompetence in not taking down old adverts or putting up a few items for sale and leaving the advert in place with the “Customers who bought this also browsed“ section at the bottom to get visitors to visit their website. I suspect the latter, irritating.

For clarity, the discussion is about a Dewalt plunge saw for £180 at B&Q. DeWalt 1300W 240V 165mm Corded Plunge saw DWS520K-GB | DIY at B&Q
 
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George_N

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From memory, the Makita 'scoring' facility has a niggle, a slight offset relative to main cut. From @Spectric table - not much to choose DeWalt/Makita?
Equally, scoring doesn't seem to score high on any of the reviews?
The Festool doesn’t have a specific “scoring” facility but it is so quick to set the saw to 2mm depth of cut that it doesn’t need it. Usually the scoring cut is made by running the saw backwards down the track. The budget saws aren’t as easy to set to precise depth so it might not be so convenient. By the way, scoring melamine like this works really well.
 

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Good choice sir!
Tool stop have the saw for £280 and track for £54.


What sort of price are you after?
In terms of other track, it’ll work with most but you won’t be able to use the anti-tip feature (useful when making bevel cuts) as that’s unique to Makita and their rails have a little lip to accommodate it.

(Equally I think the lip in question does prevent the uses of some of the festool track accessories if you ever want to use them)
Peter Millard has a video about track options
Thank you so much for that Filament. I have ordered the saw, track and clamps which should all be with me on Tuesday of next week. I couldn't spot that it comes with a 'Carry Case' but it does mention a 'Connector Case' whatever that is.

Thanks again for the 'Heads Up' 👍👍
 

Filament

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You’re very welcome. Yes, that’s the Makita carry case by the looks of it.
You’ve likely found these already, but if not, I found Peters series of track saw videos incredibly useful in setting up and getting to know the saw (particularly in terms of trimming the splinter guard and checking the blade for 90 degrees)

If it’s useful to take away the stress of worrying about messing up the splinter guard trimming, do know that if you do go wrong they are cheap to replace and easy to fit. Cheapest I found was Tools4trade

 
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Pineapple

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I've been searching for Guide-Rail-Clamps which could be used for Any type of Rail.
I use TRITON & KREG currently, but I want to leave my options open, if I can.
As Cost is important to me, I've opted for = Mafell / Bosch / Etc Track Saw guide rail clamp feet to fit various clamps | eBay
These can be used with my existing clamps, by just changeing the ends.
I hope that the more cost-conscious among us will appreciate this contribution.
 

Spectric

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I've been searching for Guide-Rail-Clamps which could be used for Any type of Rail.
Look at microjig clamps, not cheapest but anything that can provide multiple uses is more cost effective rtaher than single use. With these clamps and some simple dovetail groves in a worktop you have a very flexable clamping solution as well as holding your tracks.

 
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