Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Burnishing / polishing elm burr

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

OldWood

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2005
Messages
1,003
Reaction score
37
Location
Edinburgh
I've just completed an elm burr bowl and have been seeking guidance on finishing. Mark Baker's book "Woodturning Projects" does a number of burr objects which he uses oils to finish and then burnishes with something I'd not heard of - 'EEE-Ultrashine'.

I see that Toolpost stock this - comes from Austalia. Is it worthwhile investing in some or are other burnishing products just as good ?

Rob
 

Paul Hannaby

Established Member
Joined
1 Sep 2011
Messages
791
Reaction score
22
Location
Gloucestershire UK
I would be cautious of using any burnishing creams or pastes on a burr bowl if it has any voids or fissures because the stuff will get into places where you can't wipe it off and will dry, leaving white marks. If your burr is smooth all over then there shouldn't be a problem!
I usually resort to buffing wheels rather than burnishing but for burnishing on plastics, T-cut is good stuff. I can't say I've ever tried it on wood though. If you have some, give it a try on a scrap piece.
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,131
Reaction score
71
Location
Cotswolds UK
I think you will find the EEE--- refers to Tripoli abrasive.

If you are talking about the rough un machined burr, I find using cellulose sealer followed by a domed bristle brush burnish in the lathe is enough for me, add a little microcrystalline wax if required which if spread thinly by the bristles does not build up in the cavities.

As far as machined Burr I treat it the same as any other turning I require a gloss finish on, normally sealer and buffed though the tripoli, white diamond and wax.

Although a Dark Elm does look good Oiled, but make sure you allow any oil to cure well before buffing else you just strip any surface skin off.
 

jumps

Established Member
Joined
29 Nov 2010
Messages
937
Reaction score
0
Location
kent
Paul Hannaby":dj7dksb8 said:
...., T-cut is good stuff. I can't say I've ever tried it on wood though. If you have some, give it a try on a scrap piece.
T-cut over sanding sealer works as a step to a deep gloss finish - from memory Terry Smart includes it's use in his finishing demos.
 

Terry Smart

Chestnut Products
Joined
8 Jun 2004
Messages
696
Reaction score
19
Location
UK
I use our Burnishing Cream (of course). T-Cut works but can be a bit too agressive and cut through the sealer/polish/lacquer/oil. Burnishing Cream is safe on all of them.
It's good for polishing acrylics, Corian and other stuff too.
 

jumps

Established Member
Joined
29 Nov 2010
Messages
937
Reaction score
0
Location
kent
Terry Smart":2ynakpv3 said:
I use our Burnishing Cream (of course). T-Cut works but can be a bit too agressive and cut through the sealer/polish/lacquer/oil. Burnishing Cream is safe on all of them.
It's good for polishing acrylics, Corian and other stuff too.
damm - I knew you had mentioned it, but forgot the full context #-o
 

duncanh

Established Member
Joined
17 Jan 2003
Messages
1,316
Reaction score
0
Location
Newcastle upon Tyne
What's the best way to use burnishing cream? Apply and rub by hand or apply, put a buffing wheel to it, apply whilst the item is stationary on the lathe and the rub whilst lathe is on?
 

hughie

Established Member
Joined
16 Aug 2011
Messages
63
Reaction score
0
Location
sydney australia
I see that Toolpost stock this - comes from Austalia. Is it worthwhile investing in some or are other burnishing products just as good ?
EEE Ultrashine is a good product, I use it on a regular basis. However on Burrs if they have many voids or resin veins it can be more of hassle
This one I used a buff with EEE and it took some time to remove the build up in the voids etc
eucalyptus-burl-bowl-t57389.html

The image of the CL bowl I used EEE exclusively to polish the surface and much of the shine you see is the result of EEE as a base for the WOP
 

Attachments

Neil Farrer

Established Member
Joined
3 Jan 2012
Messages
233
Reaction score
0
Location
Hitchin
I'll support that one - EEE Ultrashine is a great product. Expensive mind you but good. The Aussies use it as an all in one, cleaner, sealer and polish. I use it alot on pens, and after sanding with the grain use a very small amount rubbed in with the grain as a cleaner, the c**p that you get on the blue paper is amazing. After I've done that I put a bit more on and spin the lathe and it comes up a very smooth but not brilliant shine, which is a great base for the Shellawax finish, out of the same stable as the EEE. Heres one I finished that way. Don't like the kit too much mind you, its an Orion from woodturningz. The wood is logwood.
Orion Logwood.jpg
 

Attachments

OldWood

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2005
Messages
1,003
Reaction score
37
Location
Edinburgh
Thanks for all your comments guys.

Can I ask the question then as to whether one can achieve a passable shine on elm burr which does have significant voiding, or do I have to accept that the finish from say Danish oil is all that can be achieved ? I suppose this is where I was originally coming from.

Cheers
Rob
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,131
Reaction score
71
Location
Cotswolds UK
OldWood":3v2aya2r said:
....Can I ask the question then as to whether one can achieve a passable shine on elm burr which does have significant voiding, or do I have to accept that the finish from say Danish oil is all that can be achieved ? I suppose this is where I was originally coming from.

Cheers
Rob

Yes you can, this was waxed finished and is still holding up 4 yrs on.
<<<< linky Pic.
 

jimi43

Established Member
Joined
12 Mar 2009
Messages
6,921
Reaction score
0
Location
Kent - the Garden of England
I agree about not using polishing finishes on burr elm...the pockets will fill up.

I really like the EEE Ultrashine though...after using micromesh it gives a really subtle polish to the wood...



...without overdoing it.

Jim
 
Top