Built-in chest of draws help

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

azk404

Established Member
Joined
24 Dec 2020
Messages
43
Reaction score
4
Location
London
Hello,

I am about to continue in the next stage of my plywood wardrobe and I'm unsure what the best order to do the assembly is. In my head I think I would do this but any advice would be welcomed.

The final design minus the drawers (looking for the correct draw runners is VERY BORING) and I might have gone to wide but I can tweak to more but less wide draws.

Is the below method the best way to assemble the cabinet or am I missing some clever tricks?

Screen Shot 2021-09-05 at 14.55.44.png



1. Build the base frame (orange) cut into carpet and level with wardrobe levelling feet. Then fit the actual wardrobe base panel on top and screw it in from above.
This will have its dado cuts for the verticals pre cut.

Screen Shot 2021-09-05 at 14.56.26.png



2. I would have to build this in the room on a sheet of ply to keep it relatively flat. Piece the vertical sections front down into top panel also with its dado groove pre cut.
Then fit the back panel (which is an inset piece) and screw/pocket hole where needed. Once dry I can then lift and rotate it onto the base and pocket hole screw to attach it.


Screen Shot 2021-09-05 at 14.57.38.png




The above part of the build is photoed below which I am pretty happy with considering it was my first major woodworking project :)

IMG_1794.jpg
 

porker

Established Member
Joined
15 Oct 2009
Messages
784
Reaction score
118
Location
Butlers Cross, Buckinghamshire
If it were me I would build the main body of your wardrobe as 3 seperate boxes. Fit the plinth and level it as you say but I wouldn't try to build the body as a single piece as it would be unweildy and heavy to move and position.
Take a look at @petermillard videos on YT as he has built a few wardrobes this way. From your sketch it looks like you would only use one more vertical divider to do it this way. Not sure what you are doing for doors but it may also make this easier.
 

gcusick

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
16 Sep 2019
Messages
167
Reaction score
175
Location
Devon
There’s also no real need for the top panel on the plinth. So: build the plinth, putting a cross member under each of the vertical divisions; install and level the plinth; build the main structure as 3 open-fronted boxes; position them on the plinth and screw down, et voila!
 

azk404

Established Member
Joined
24 Dec 2020
Messages
43
Reaction score
4
Location
London
Thing is I was planning for the edges of the ply to be visible from the front so if I made it as 3 boxes I would have a few extra double sides right? Also the double middle panel is only so it aligns with the shelves above that are already built.

If I built it as 3 separate boxes would the bottom plinth panel have to be separate pieces as well and hopefully the edges align nicely with the box next to it as the top would have to be one panel as it will be visible from the top?

Maybe I can build as 3 boxes and use the draw fronts to conceal some this as use the top panel to cover the joins at the top?

Screenshot 2021-09-05 at 20.57.59.png
Screenshot 2021-09-05 at 20.54.40.png
 

petermillard

Established Member
Joined
2 Oct 2009
Messages
1,974
Reaction score
320
Location
West London
If it was a 3-box design you’d only see another upright on the left hand box - you already have one visible at right - but you’re right, avoiding the ‘double upright’ is the reason to go for that design. Personally, I find the single upright at left and the double at right a little jarring, though I take your point about matching to what you already have. You could make it as a 3-box design and have a single top that covers them all, if you want to avoid seeing the joins?

It isn’t a big unit though you should easily be able to make what you’ve proposed and rotate it onto the plinth.

Oh, and Blum Movento for the drawer runners. 👍👍
 

azk404

Established Member
Joined
24 Dec 2020
Messages
43
Reaction score
4
Location
London
Even though I feel I probably could just about build it as I originally planned as its not that tall I have decided to go for the 3 box method as then I can build it in the workshop and move it in which will be less work running back and fourth for stuff I imagine :)

I added the top panel to cover the joins and I think I won't use the long plinth panel and just fit them together at the bottom as it was proving a little tricky to hide the bottoms of the boxes with the false fronts neatly. If I use the same ply sheet for the bottom panels for all 3 boxes then they should align well enough in theory.

I went for some deep rabbet cuts for a bit of style.

Thank you all feeling better about it already.

Only thing I am slightly concerned about is the draw width as the internal cabinet width is 850mm so draw will be about 808mm but if I go with he Movento's should that just about be ok?

Screen Shot 2021-09-06 at 12.56.30.png

Screen Shot 2021-09-06 at 12.57.04.png
 

JobandKnock

Amateur curmudgeon
Joined
14 Apr 2021
Messages
801
Reaction score
459
Location
Lancashire
I think that housed joints (assuming you are in the UK) for a softwood ladder frame are perhaps over thinking it. You'd easily get sufficient strength and rigidity by just screwing the frame together with something like 5 x 100mm CSK head screws, especially as you intend to overclad it.

Similarly you could just use packing shims and angle plates to kevel and secure the frame in place.

I'm in full agreement with the comments about building it as 3 boxes. Not only are smaller boxes lighter and therefore easier to position, but also MDF and plywood structures are heavy and when you get to even modest sizes can actually be too heavy for the fixings to hold them togethet when they are moved (e.g from downstairscto upstairs) unless some additional strengthening is incorporated
 
Last edited:
Top