• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Bought the Titan Bandsaw, replacing it with a Record BS250

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,643
Reaction score
467
Location
Pershore, Worcester
Long story short. House clearout, some tools being sold, some money going back into tools that will get used. HVLP Sprayer and Titan Plunge Saw + ST2800 Evolution track are all good. This bandsaw is not. Prior to buying these tools most of my stuff has all been slightly more expensive branded gear and I've never had any issues at all. Bosch Blue Jigsaw/Tablesaw/SDS/drill driver/smaller drill driver,/6" Random Orbit Sander, Fein Multimaster, etc. But, times are what they are and I have to make some choices. One of which was the Tablsesaw going as it just didn't get used (not permanent so had to come out, get use, go back). Anyway.

It was £110 delivered from screwfix. Bought in part after seeing some of Peter Millards comments on it in his videos (as were the other bits bought above). Plenty of reviews say it's fine, maybe it just this one, maybe I've checked it more than some, maybe it's just bad luck. For most of my uses it probably would have sufficed. But why settle? I'd have to buy a new fence and blade at a minumum, and probably make a new table for it.

The table isn't close to flat, as can be seen in the photos. The insert around the blade is even lower still. Quite often in my toying with it wood would get stuck trying to get back onto the other side of the table.





Even with the table Hulked down tight, it can still go off piste quite easily as can be seen from the next two photos. This is just a bit of pressure on the side you'd be standing on.




With an actual solid fence in place, its also not cutting straight. There is a fair bit of lateral movement on the blade just because the wheels are only round-ish. I don't have a dial gauge to measure just how much they are out, but its enough. Regularly the start and end of cuts were narrower than the middle.



The upper blade guides obviously have to go up and down, but when they do so they are often misaligned at one extreme compared to the other. Also not square to the blade. The entire mechanism is plastic (Though I'm not one of the crazies that thinks all plastic is rubbish), its just not sturdy enough for this job.



Finally, when setting up the top wheel tracking, it was impossible to set the gullet of the tooth to be in the centre of the wheel while also not having the blade contact the upper thrust bearing. It simply cannot move back far enough. How I'd run a larger blade in there I'm not sure.



The included fence can't be secured down and not move. The included mitre fence even done up tight still moves, and also is sloppy in the slot with no option to take up the slack.

Oh, and its 15 whole turns of a screwdriver to open the doors. 15. I counted.

So. I'll be sending it back to Screwfix.

In the search for its replacement I considered the Axminster Craft AC1400B at £200 though it has no mitre fence included and only has a dumb small slot (why why why do they do this, it was the same on the Bosch table saw :evil: ). It's a 1400mm blade, 200mm wheel and copper blade guides and a cast iron table. I then considered its bigger brother the Axminster Craft AC1950B. Ceramic guides, 1950 blade, 270mm wheels, a proper slot, £300.

Then I found the Record Power B250 on sale for £221 (usually £260-£280) Cast iron table, 250mm wheel, bearing guides, stupid small slot (I think), 15mm less depth of cut than the Axminster AC1950B but still more than enough for me.

I'll let you know if a) they actually honour the price and b) how it turns out.
 

Trainee neophyte

[Known Putin apologist ]
Joined
12 Apr 2019
Messages
2,514
Reaction score
325
Location
Greece
I have a "need" for a bandsaw, and I have been wondering if I could cope with the deficiencies of a cheap one. I think you have answered all my questions here, and I will be saving up for a real one instead. Thank you for your time.
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
162
Location
cyprus
Cant argue about any of those points. :roll:
Not even sure I'm seeing right that the blade guides are steel pins :shock: :shock:

But looking at that cut in the piece of wood I think your feed rate is too fast and not consistent. To get a straight cut on a bandsaw only needs to allow the blade to do its job, without forcing it too fast or exerting sideways pressures. Guides shouldnt touch the blade unless you're going round corners.

I have an axminster 350, and apart from the inevitable "setting up" period that all such machines require, I am very happy with it.

Note to neophyte..... (apart from needing a smaller name tag :roll: ) Axminster deliver all over europe at a pretty fair price. I've had several pieces shipped from them to Cyprus, including the bandsaw.
 

PeteG

Established Member
Joined
9 Jun 2013
Messages
998
Reaction score
1
Location
Manchester
DBT85":danrmifk said:
Long story short. House clearout, some tools being sold, some money going back into tools that will get used. HVLP Sprayer and Titan Plunge Saw + ST2800 Evolution track are all good. This bandsaw is not. Prior to buying these tools most of my stuff has all been slightly more expensive branded gear and I've never had any issues at all. Bosch Blue Jigsaw/Tablesaw/SDS/drill driver/smaller drill driver,/6" Random Orbit Sander, Fein Multimaster, etc. But, times are what they are and I have to make some choices. One of which was the Tablsesaw going as it just didn't get used (not permanent so had to come out, get use, go back). Anyway.

It was £110 delivered from screwfix. Bought in part after seeing some of Peter Millards comments on it in his videos (as were the other bits bought above). Plenty of reviews say it's fine, maybe it just this one, maybe I've checked it more than some, maybe it's just bad luck. For most of my uses it probably would have sufficed. But why settle? I'd have to buy a new fence and blade at a minumum, and probably make a new table for it.
That's very disappointing fella, the table alone is shocking...Peter Millard made a fairly recent comment that he'd received messages from folk saying that they hadn't experienced
any of the problems that he with a Titan B/S bought two years earlier (That's if memory serves right). It kind of made me think that perhaps quality control may just have been
introduced and it might be a viable option over spending £300.00. Saying that, perhaps you could get a replacement and find it's perfect, probably doubtful though.

The Axminster Craft AC1950B was on my shortlist along with the Record BS250. I liked the idea of not having to remove the fence on the Axminster every time you change blades,
but if I had the funds, I'd be tempted by the Record. I think after they sent me new parts to repair the AC400 which was out of warranty, I feel they deserve a little loyalty.

If you do get the Record at £221.00 that's a cracking price, and I've found Record very helpful on more than occasion. Just sorry about your disappointment over the Titan.
 

Nelsun

Established Member
Joined
22 Jun 2015
Messages
860
Reaction score
66
Location
Shetland
You got unlucky with he Titan from the looks of its wonkyness.

I went the other way i.e. BS250 to Titan. The BS250 was fine for the size but, boy was it heavy to lump around. The Titan, with its aluminium bits is perfectly luggable.

Peter Millard's fence upgrade worked well enough to not be the horror show of the stock one (and didn't cost too much) to the point of ripping 3x20x~1000 oak strips with surprising consistency. This was with a Tuffsaws blade as the reviews of the Titan blade were universaly awful.

The table won't rust either... but that's nothing to boast about ;) The BS250 is definitely a better machine but just not for me. Whoever designed the door opening mechanisms on the Titan deserve their own special hot place opening and closing them for the rest of eternity.
 

Trainee neophyte

[Known Putin apologist ]
Joined
12 Apr 2019
Messages
2,514
Reaction score
325
Location
Greece
sunnybob":1ttb0ixf said:
Cant argue about any of those points. :roll:
Not even sure I'm seeing right that the blade guides are steel pins :shock: :shock:

But looking at that cut in the piece of wood I think your feed rate is too fast and not consistent. To get a straight cut on a bandsaw only needs to allow the blade to do its job, without forcing it too fast or exerting sideways pressures. Guides shouldnt touch the blade unless you're going round corners.

I have an axminster 350, and apart from the inevitable "setting up" period that all such machines require, I am very happy with it.

Note to neophyte..... (apart from needing a smaller name tag :roll: ) Axminster deliver all over europe at a pretty fair price. I've had several pieces shipped from them to Cyprus, including the bandsaw.
Thank you - I have just taken delivery of a table saw from Axminster, and they posted it free! I only need to rack up €150 in goods and the next order will be free, too!!!

Oh, and btw, hope the Syrians aren't bombing too close to you (assuming it really WAS the Syrians - long way for a missile to "accidentally" fly by mistake, and hit the only land in a lot of water).
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
162
Location
cyprus
Thats good news for you, but bloody annoying for me. They charged me 90 quid delivery :shock:
But I suppose thats what I get for being outside mainland europe, and it was still better than anyone else quoted. :roll:

That "missile" is now claimed to be russian (not by the russians of course), but theres a lot of counter claims that it was fired from an israeli plane (they use mainly american equipment). Luckily it landed on the northern side above Nicosia and nobody was hurt.
It is strange that some of the best listening equipment in the world is sited here and nobody heard it coming . :roll: :oops:
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,643
Reaction score
467
Location
Pershore, Worcester
sunnybob":3foxiuwj said:
Thats good news for you, but bloody annoying for me. They charged me 90 quid delivery :shock:
But I suppose thats what I get for being outside mainland europe, and it was still better than anyone else quoted. :roll:

That "missile" is now claimed to be russian (not by the russians of course), but theres a lot of counter claims that it was fired from an israeli plane (they use mainly american equipment). Luckily it landed on the northern side above Nicosia and nobody was hurt.
It is strange that some of the best listening equipment in the world is sited here and nobody heard it coming . :roll: :oops:
Ahh my daughter suffers the same selective deafness.

Incidentally, only just got back from 3 weeks in Proteras, absolutely loved it. Spent a bit too much in Zorbas bakery though :D
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
162
Location
cyprus
Good grief man, if youd let me know I'd have bought the first beer. I live 20 minutes away. :roll: :roll: :roll:
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,643
Reaction score
467
Location
Pershore, Worcester
Trainee neophyte":3q1ypbzr said:
I have a "need" for a bandsaw, and I have been wondering if I could cope with the deficiencies of a cheap one. I think you have answered all my questions here, and I will be saving up for a real one instead. Thank you for your time.
As others have said, it's possible mine was just bad. I'm not averse to tinkering and while I'm annoyed that anything needs fiddling with to get it just right, this is just too far. I'll update the thread with my thoughts on the BS250 once it arrives.

sunnybob":3q1ypbzr said:
Cant argue about any of those points. :roll:
Not even sure I'm seeing right that the blade guides are steel pins :shock: :shock:

But looking at that cut in the piece of wood I think your feed rate is too fast and not consistent. To get a straight cut on a bandsaw only needs to allow the blade to do its job, without forcing it too fast or exerting sideways pressures. Guides shouldnt touch the blade unless you're going round corners.
Thats entirely possible. On a few bits I tried feeding it much slower to see the results and natithey were better. I'd get a new blade once I'm happy with whatever machine I end up with anyway.

They are certainly pins, not sure on the metal used. Had I turned the machine on before moving them I'd have killed the blade though as they were way too far forward and so would have clipped the teeth.
Nelsun":3q1ypbzr said:
You got unlucky with he Titan from the looks of its wonkyness.

I went the other way i.e. BS250 to Titan. The BS250 was fine for the size but, boy was it heavy to lump around. The Titan, with its aluminium bits is perfectly luggable.
Ahh interesting. Mine will be just staying in its place so the weight isn't an issue. Apart from the weight, did you encounter any issues with the BS250?
sunnybob":3q1ypbzr said:
Good grief man, if youd let me know I'd have bought the first beer. I live 20 minutes away. :roll: :roll: :roll:
Ahh if only I had known. Not that we didn't do our best to drink the island dry though :lol:

Glad we left before that missile, wife and her mum would have had kittens.
 

novocaine

Established Member
Joined
21 Jul 2014
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
331
Location
Warrington
apart from the stuff we know is shocking (fence, blade etc.) The wonky table (that does look pretty shocking I have to say) all the rest are things that are adjustable and want to set myself to make sure it's running right even on a more expensive machine.
The guide arm has 2 screws, back them out half a turn, set it at the top and the bottom of it's stroke and you're done.
The pins are pot grade steel I think, considerably softer than a blade and you have them set way to wide.
The rear guide wheel is meant to be like that, it isn't designed to run a larger blade than a 1/4" although you can squeeze a 3/8" in there without modifications and a 1/2" with (it can just about tension it but you have to run it blade centre rather than teeth centre) set the back of the gullet in the centre of the wheel.
The throat plate is meant to be like that, something about ensuring you are pushing down on the stock was what I was told by a designer (might be a bit of bull poop that though)
Theres a support screw under the table to hold it level and the rear quick lever for tilting the table needs to be adjusted carefully so it locks before it reaches the end of it's thread, think it's meant to have a washer in there which if missing lets it bottom out.

You are overworking the blade, it's pretty much blunt from sitting in a box with no grease on it for the past 6 months while it travels the world, a new blade would make a huge difference, also doesn't look like it's tensioned enough from that cut.

Difference between 110 (I paid 90 for mine) and 300 quid is considerable, I expect you BS250 to work out the box for that price, I expect something that's a 3rd of the price of it's nearest true competitor (I don't think the workzone is a competitor to this saw) to need setting up, I wouldn't buy a tool without wanting to do that though.

Oh and the door openers are genuinely terrible but incredibly easy to swap to something else, I've got lovely oak floor knobs on mine with 2-3 threads holding the door shut.

Sorry you got a bum job with your titan, it's a shame really as they are surprisingly good saws once set up as shown by Peter and born of my own experience with it (I've had mine about 8 months longer than Peter had his). I can't blame you though, if I could have afforded the 300 quid saw I'd have bought it to be honest.
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,643
Reaction score
467
Location
Pershore, Worcester
novocaine":33m3zvfn said:
The guide arm has 2 screws, back them out half a turn, set it at the top and the bottom of it's stroke and you're done.
Do you mean these 2 screws? This guide seems to press against the mechanism and hold it true. Only it doesn't do enough on this example.


novocaine":33m3zvfn said:
The pins are pot grade steel I think, considerably softer than a blade and you have them set way to wide.
Genuinely, I snugged them against the blade, gave the top wheel 3 full rotations and then buttoned them down. Any closer than this and it would be rubbing at some point in the rotation without even cutting anything. The instructions say to put a playing card between the left one and the blade. They just don't mention if that should be with the wheel at its most or least wobble :lol:

novocaine":33m3zvfn said:
The rear guide wheel is meant to be like that, it isn't designed to run a larger blade than a 1/4" although you can squeeze a 3/8" in there without modifications and a 1/2" with (it can just about tension it but you have to run it blade centre rather than teeth centre) set the back of the gullet in the centre of the wheel.
So with the stock sized blade, you are able to run with the gullet in the centre of the wheel and not touch that thrust bearing (unless cutting)? Again, mine doesn't touch constantly, just on bits of the loop depending on where it is in its rotation. Maybe an issue with the stock blade, but not something I want to pay to find out given the other issues. It might be part of the issue with the wheels not being actually round.
novocaine":33m3zvfn said:
Theres a support screw under the table to hold it level and the rear quick lever for tilting the table needs to be adjusted carefully so it locks before it reaches the end of it's thread, think it's meant to have a washer in there which if missing lets it bottom out.
There is a support screw on the inside half of the table, it's putting a little pressure on the outside half that makes it move in that direction. There's plenty of thread left on the quick release, I literally just can't do it up further without a longer lever.

novocaine":33m3zvfn said:
You are overworking the blade, it's pretty much blunt from sitting in a box with no grease on it for the past 6 months while it travels the world, a new blade would make a huge difference, also doesn't look like it's tensioned enough from that cut.
Entirely plausible on all fronts, this is my first bandsaw and I was trying different bits of offcut and tensions and feed rates just trying to see what it could do in its existing state.

I do wonder just how much the quality has changed over the last few years, as you said Peter Millard has talked about it on his channel. Maybe this one is just a bad one, maybe its more indicative of the stuff put out today.

novocaine":33m3zvfn said:
Difference between 110 (I paid 90 for mine) and 300 quid is considerable, I expect you BS250 to work out the box for that price, I expect something that's a 3rd of the price of it's nearest true competitor (I don't think the workzone is a competitor to this saw) to need setting up, I wouldn't buy a tool without wanting to do that though.
Absolutely, though sadly in this day and age I think the only powered tool that doesn't need a little poking to get just right is a drill :lol:

I was hoping to not spend £300 so the BS250 at £221 came in at a nice compromise. We'll see just how much compromise there is.

novocaine":33m3zvfn said:
Oh and the door openers are genuinely terrible but incredibly easy to swap to something else, I've got lovely oak floor knobs on mine with 2-3 threads holding the door shut.
Oh yeah, I think over time its probably something I'd have done, though the threads would have been cut down in a few days! You can't expect nice perfect knobs and handles at these kinds of prices. Why it wasn't just a quick release like the Ryobi this is a copy of is beyond me though.

novocaine":33m3zvfn said:
Sorry you got a bum job with your titan, it's a shame really as they are surprisingly good saws once set up as shown by Peter and born of my own experience with it (I've had mine about 8 months longer than Peter had his). I can't blame you though, if I could have afforded the 300 quid saw I'd have bought it to be honest.
Indeed it is a pain, though you have to expect it a little at these kinds of prices. I took my first titan plunge saw back as it looked like it had a hole where one should not exist. Only when I got the 2nd did I realise it was indeed supposed to be a hole, it just hadn't been properly made in the casting of the first one.

Thanks so much for your input Novocaine. Especially as you have one even if it's an older one. Some of the things you've mentioned are going to be useful for me for my further use of whatever bandsaw I end up with.
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
162
Location
cyprus
phil.p":2okpsi56 said:
If you wish for something to work out of the box I suspect you'll pay a lot more than £300. :D
second that. my last big box was 800 quids worth. only took me two days to sort the stupid quality control failures.

The 200 quid bench drill needed a week and re machining bolt thread holes and making parts and rewiring switches myself.

I should think a couple grand might give you a good chance of "out of the box working".
 

novocaine

Established Member
Joined
21 Jul 2014
Messages
2,577
Reaction score
331
Location
Warrington
DBT85":sx1v13sb said:
Do you mean these 2 screws? This guide seems to press against the mechanism and hold it true. Only it doesn't do enough on this example.
I seem to remember there being screws inside the arm rather than to the side but I haven't got the saw in front of me. I'll look tonight.

DBT85":sx1v13sb said:
Genuinely, I snugged them against the blade, gave the top wheel 3 full rotations and then buttoned them down. Any closer than this and it would be rubbing at some point in the rotation without even cutting anything. The instructions say to put a playing card between the left one and the blade. They just don't mention if that should be with the wheel at its most or least wobble :lol:
check the tyres are seated correctly. I didn't have to true mine but I've had to scrape them since buying it as I once (and only once) used it to cut some aluminium just to see what it would do (what it did was leave lots of shrapnel in the rubber), you can spin the wheel buy hand with a guide against it to find where it's out of centre, check the tyre centre and the wheel edge, you'll most likely find it's the tyre that's at fault.
DBT85":sx1v13sb said:
So with the stock sized blade, you are able to run with the gullet in the centre of the wheel and not touch that thrust bearing (unless cutting)?
Yes, before I made a new rear guide arm that sits the wheel further back so I could put a 1/2" blade in there :wink:. I changed the stock blade to a tuffsaw almost straight away which has a deeper gullet for the same pitch, that gave me a bit more room to wiggle.

DBT85":sx1v13sb said:
Again, mine doesn't touch constantly, just on bits of the loop depending on where it is in its rotation. Maybe an issue with the stock blade, but not something I want to pay to find out given the other issues. It might be part of the issue with the wheels not being actually round.
Sounds like the back of your blade is out of flat, a new blade would go along way to fixing that but you can also true it with a dremel and a sanding wheel if you are feeling brave (I had to do this to the stock blade recently as the tuffsaw blade is dead after 2 years).

DBT85":sx1v13sb said:
There is a support screw on the inside half of the table, it's putting a little pressure on the outside half that makes it move in that direction. There's plenty of thread left on the quick release, I literally just can't do it up further without a longer lever.
Thats a strange one that I can't comment on as mine is pretty much rock solid.


DBT85":sx1v13sb said:
Entirely plausible on all fronts, this is my first bandsaw and I was trying different bits of offcut and tensions and feed rates just trying to see what it could do in its existing state.

I do wonder just how much the quality has changed over the last few years, as you said Peter Millard has talked about it on his channel. Maybe this one is just a bad one, maybe its more indicative of the stuff put out today.
It's an interesting conundrum and something I'd like to see myself, unfortunately I'm not about to buy another one to find out and it would be almost irrelvant with the tweaks and modifications I've made over the past few years.
DBT85":sx1v13sb said:
Absolutely, though sadly in this day and age I think the only powered tool that doesn't need a little poking to get just right is a drill :lol:
seems about right, although I do rather like my little oscillating saw which seems to have worked out the box and is dirt cheap. :D

DBT85":sx1v13sb said:
Thanks so much for your input Novocaine. Especially as you have one even if it's an older one. Some of the things you've mentioned are going to be useful for me for my further use of whatever bandsaw I end up with.
hopefully the next box you get works for you.
 

Nelsun

Established Member
Joined
22 Jun 2015
Messages
860
Reaction score
66
Location
Shetland
DBT85":1x44eyer said:
Nelsun":1x44eyer said:
You got unlucky with he Titan from the looks of its wonkyness.

I went the other way i.e. BS250 to Titan. The BS250 was fine for the size but, boy was it heavy to lump around. The Titan, with its aluminium bits is perfectly luggable.
Ahh interesting. Mine will be just staying in its place so the weight isn't an issue. Apart from the weight, did you encounter any issues with the BS250?
It was some time ago and the only thing that jumps to mind was that, even trued up and with Tuffsaw blades fitted, it felt underpowered. That's not going to come as a surprise to anyone as it's a small bandsaw. The Titan in't no beast either but it'll handle ripping 2" oak which is fine by me.

In my setup I have very limited space (10x4" shed) with 2 MFT sized benches claiming most of that; so every task has to be set up for and then bigger tools put away ready for the next one. Hauling the BS250 up from the house and back again grew old very quickly! The Titan is light (and cheap) enough to just leave in a corner (the table being aluminium is an actual bonus in my case) and pop up on a bench when needed without any bother. Since you have space to dedicate to a bandsaw I'd ponder looking for something with a bigger motor if you can... that's assuming you're looking at ripping anything thicker than a couple of inches.
 

Bodgers

Established Member
Joined
21 Dec 2014
Messages
1,866
Reaction score
1
Location
North Yorks
DBT85":mctp6d5f said:
Long story short. House clearout, some tools being sold, some money going back into tools that will get used. HVLP Sprayer and Titan Plunge Saw + ST2800 Evolution track are all good. This bandsaw is not. Prior to buying these tools most of my stuff has all been slightly more expensive branded gear and I've never had any issues at all. Bosch Blue Jigsaw/Tablesaw/SDS/drill driver/smaller drill driver,/6" Random Orbit Sander, Fein Multimaster, etc. But, times are what they are and I have to make some choices. One of which was the Tablsesaw going as it just didn't get used (not permanent so had to come out, get use, go back). Anyway.

It was £110 delivered from screwfix. Bought in part after seeing some of Peter Millards comments on it in his videos (as were the other bits bought above). Plenty of reviews say it's fine, maybe it just this one, maybe I've checked it more than some, maybe it's just bad luck. For most of my uses it probably would have sufficed. But why settle? I'd have to buy a new fence and blade at a minumum, and probably make a new table for it.

The table isn't close to flat, as can be seen in the photos. The insert around the blade is even lower still. Quite often in my toying with it wood would get stuck trying to get back onto the other side of the table.





Even with the table Hulked down tight, it can still go off piste quite easily as can be seen from the next two photos. This is just a bit of pressure on the side you'd be standing on.




With an actual solid fence in place, its also not cutting straight. There is a fair bit of lateral movement on the blade just because the wheels are only round-ish. I don't have a dial gauge to measure just how much they are out, but its enough. Regularly the start and end of cuts were narrower than the middle.



The upper blade guides obviously have to go up and down, but when they do so they are often misaligned at one extreme compared to the other. Also not square to the blade. The entire mechanism is plastic (Though I'm not one of the crazies that thinks all plastic is rubbish), its just not sturdy enough for this job.



Finally, when setting up the top wheel tracking, it was impossible to set the gullet of the tooth to be in the centre of the wheel while also not having the blade contact the upper thrust bearing. It simply cannot move back far enough. How I'd run a larger blade in there I'm not sure.



The included fence can't be secured down and not move. The included mitre fence even done up tight still moves, and also is sloppy in the slot with no option to take up the slack.

Oh, and its 15 whole turns of a screwdriver to open the doors. 15. I counted.

So. I'll be sending it back to Screwfix.

In the search for its replacement I considered the Axminster Craft AC1400B at £200 though it has no mitre fence included and only has a dumb small slot (why why why do they do this, it was the same on the Bosch table saw :evil: ). It's a 1400mm blade, 200mm wheel and copper blade guides and a cast iron table. I then considered its bigger brother the Axminster Craft AC1950B. Ceramic guides, 1950 blade, 270mm wheels, a proper slot, £300.

Then I found the Record Power B250 on sale for £221 (usually £260-£280) Cast iron table, 250mm wheel, bearing guides, stupid small slot (I think), 15mm less depth of cut than the Axminster AC1950B but still more than enough for me.

I'll let you know if a) they actually honour the price and b) how it turns out.
Your expectations have to be kept in check with these cheap little bandsaws.

Fine for cutting curves in small parts, but as soon as you start holding expensive engineers squares and straight edges up against them you are going to be disappointed.
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,643
Reaction score
467
Location
Pershore, Worcester
novocaine":2r8yuxda said:
I seem to remember there being screws inside the arm rather than to the side but I haven't got the saw in front of me. I'll look tonight.
Ahh, i'll have another look, for the sake of curiosity.

novocaine":2r8yuxda said:
check the tyres are seated correctly. I didn't have to true mine but I've had to scrape them since buying it as I once (and only once) used it to cut some aluminium just to see what it would do (what it did was leave lots of shrapnel in the rubber), you can spin the wheel buy hand with a guide against it to find where it's out of centre, check the tyre centre and the wheel edge, you'll most likely find it's the tyre that's at fault.
Hmm, I wonder whether they've also changed the tyres. I did try holding something steady against the wheel and sometimes it scraped and others it didn't, so maybe that's part of all this. I really need a dial gauge.

novocaine":2r8yuxda said:
Yes, before I made a new rear guide arm that sits the wheel further back so I could put a 1/2" blade in there :wink:. I changed the stock blade to a tuffsaw almost straight away which has a deeper gullet for the same pitch, that gave me a bit more room to wiggle.
Ha yes I'd already made mental plans to make a new one or at least modifications. That was before I saw the table. A tuffsaws blade was also on the list.

novocaine":2r8yuxda said:
Sounds like the back of your blade is out of flat, a new blade would go along way to fixing that but you can also true it with a dremel and a sanding wheel if you are feeling brave (I had to do this to the stock blade recently as the tuffsaw blade is dead after 2 years).
I suspect it may well be. As i said, had the table not been as bad as it is, I'd have bought a new blade and some of these issues may well have gone away.

novocaine":2r8yuxda said:
hopefully the next box you get works for you.
So say we all!
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,643
Reaction score
467
Location
Pershore, Worcester
Nelsun":1or96yf4 said:
It was some time ago and the only thing that jumps to mind was that, even trued up and with Tuffsaw blades fitted, it felt underpowered. That's not going to come as a surprise to anyone as it's a small bandsaw. The Titan in't no beast either but it'll handle ripping 2" oak which is fine by me.

In my setup I have very limited space (10x4" shed) with 2 MFT sized benches claiming most of that; so every task has to be set up for and then bigger tools put away ready for the next one. Hauling the BS250 up from the house and back again grew old very quickly! The Titan is light (and cheap) enough to just leave in a corner (the table being aluminium is an actual bonus in my case) and pop up on a bench when needed without any bother. Since you have space to dedicate to a bandsaw I'd ponder looking for something with a bigger motor if you can... that's assuming you're looking at ripping anything thicker than a couple of inches.
Ahh ok, I can understand that. Lugging it up and down would be a pain in the butt tocks, same as me and my tablesaw.

I'm no furniture maker. My workshop thus far has been entirely used (when I can get in it) to do jobs for the house. The thickest oak I have here is some 40mm worktop (which I'm making into a cabinet for the tablesaw and bench drill). This right now will be more than sufficient from a grunt perspective. I want to do more "real" woodwork and I have ideas all over the place. Invariably other jobs need doing first and so getting to them is not easy for me. My workshop is 4x3m and indoors which is great, except when the kid is napping from 1-3.30 and then asleep from 7. I'll take what I can get though!

The BS250 is listed as a nice metric 1/2 HP :roll: so somewhere in the 350w range for short use and 250w for continuous use, which is what I've seen on a sticker from the motor on an Amazon review. That does seem small given its a bit larger than the titan which has the same. But again, enough for now.

Maybe I'll use my new bandsaw to help me make a Wandel. One more project on the list.

Bodgers":1or96yf4 said:
Your expectations have to be kept in check with these cheap little bandsaws.

Fine for cutting curves in small parts, but as soon as you start holding expensive engineers squares and straight edges up against them you are going to be disappointed.
Oh I do agree. You do get what you pay for. I knew it probably wasn't going to be perfect even after tinkering. But I'd hoped at least for a flat (ish) table.
 
Top