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jonesbones

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hi I wonder if anyone has a good method of polishing Irish bog oak tried a couple of ways thin ca glue polishing by buffing . but it dosent seem to work very well any ideas welcome jonesbones
 

CHJ

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Seal with Cellulose sanding sealer, sand down to 240/320 grit, re-apply cellulose sanding sealer, burnished on the lathe whilst drying.

Followed by three stage buffing, in my case using the Chestnut mops.

Sample one Link

Sample two Link
 

boysie39

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Indeed you did Steve , and I cantell you that that and the other one you made are pride of plce in my trophy cabinet and still looking as good as the day you made them . Several ovetures have been made to me but to no avail .
Clair uses hers a lot and it has not changed one bit . A really good finish . Thanks again for your kind thought .
 

jumps

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I think a lot depends on whether you want to fill the grain or not. It can be very coarse. Thin CA as you describe is probably the opposite to SS + sanding + SS, with regard to this.

I rather like so see some of the grain, but then again it also looks good 'smooth and deep'.

This was one coat 80/20, de nibbed then buffed

 

CHJ

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As a matter of interest I find really old bog oak, the dry splitting dusty variety, does not readily activate CA glue without an accelerator, then you need an accelerator that does not leave a white deposit.
 

jumps

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CHJ":30ezloev said:
As a matter of interest I find really old bog oak, the dry splitting dusty variety, does not readily activate CA glue without an accelerator, then you need an accelerator that does not leave a white deposit.
not sure 'old' is the right descriptor here Chas, my supplier is of the view that getting the thicker planks dry is often the problem, but his current supply is only 5300 years old.... #-o

but I think I know what you mean.
 

CHJ

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jumps":1x7vjdjf said:
not sure 'old' is the right descriptor here Chas,.....
Possibly not, just trying to differentiate between the stuff that comes out looking like a wrinkled prune or lump of charcoal and jet black/dark grey in colour (first sample above) and the stuff that has obviously been immersed for some considerable time and taken on the appropriate black/dark brown staining but is not much differing in texture to any other bit of old oak. (second sample above)
 

jonesbones

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thanks for all the tips will keep on experimenting if I come up with anything I will surely let you know jonesbones
 

condeesteso

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Interesting, i have been working some bog oak recently (not turning though) and I reckon it is a bit of a sod. Way more open than oak, and seems hyper-dry, almost crackly / dusty. Hard to describe, easy to see and feel. I suspect in turned components it could be burnished and the cellulose with heat may do it (CHJs cask above looks lovely), but for furniture bits not turned it is a bit tricky to finish nicely. Simply filling the very open grain seems a shame, but maybe no alternative?
 
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