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Blocking a cooker air vent, wasp entry

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pe2dave

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Having a wasp nest removed tonight. A 'brick' about 9x6, gaps in it. Used as exit for blown cooker hood.
Question:
How to block it up (no longer used) to stop further nests? Kitchen fitter suggested silicon sealant - but (guessing) there's a huge gap behind
to fill with sealant?
I thought of expanding foam, but suspect wasps can nibble through that (before realised it was wasps, thought I had an electric arc, the crackling
as the wasps nibble at whatever...).

Any suggestions please - bricky to remove it - issue: we can no longer get matching bricks.
 

HappyHacker

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Just fill the gaps/holes in the air brick with silicon, there is no need to fill behind the brick.
 

Droogs

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Put some fine mesh metal sheet behind the brick - stops the beasties but keeps the airflow
 

Linus

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Easiest solution is to screw a ventilation louvre on the outside that has an insect screen and covers the entire air cavity. i.e.
 

AdrianUK

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I had a wasp nest eradicated some years back, the advice from the local authority expert was that for most circumstance, the old nest is left in situ, as wasps will not re-inhabit and old nest. If any do enter to investigate, then the chemicals would kill them.
The point was that what made the location suitable previously, will make it suitable again. Leaving the old nest in place acts as a deterrent. Not possible for all scenarios, but if it’s in a cavity, then practical.
I would also want to seal up the entry holes, but hopefully this may give you some peace of mind.
 

Vono

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I had a wasp nest eradicated some years back, the advice from the local authority expert was that for most circumstance, the old nest is left in situ, as wasps will not re-inhabit and old nest. If any do enter to investigate, then the chemicals would kill them.
The point was that what made the location suitable previously, will make it suitable again. Leaving the old nest in place acts as a deterrent. Not possible for all scenarios, but if it’s in a cavity, then practical.
I would also want to seal up the entry holes, but hopefully this may give you some peace of mind.
Yes that's exactly what I was told by Rentokill when I had one in the loft. Leave the old one there as it deters them from returning.
 

Cabinetman

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They are quite beautifully made things with swirls of different coloured wood, I remember a shed door I had once was seriously roughened by wasps munching at it for their nest.
 

Terrytpot

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My mother had an old unused header tank that was left in situ which became a home for the little sh1ts that used the overflow to get in. I capped it off with some fine mesh and a jubilee clip then set about killing the ones trapped in her airing cupboard...they have not returned so I'm counting that as a win.
 

Trainee neophyte

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Leave the old one there as it deters them from returning.
You should see my tool shed roof - hundreds of nests built cheek-by-jowl. I leave them where they are because of the myth that wasps won't build next to an old nest, but it does seem to be a myth. Current excitement is a hornets' nest in an old washing machine in the scrap heap. They have 4 holes to go in and out, so I am perplexed as to how to approach and "deal" with it. If I spray into one hole, hornets will pour out of the other three and we will all have a difficult day. I'm thinking high pressure and distance, and a lot of insecticide. I wouldn't bother but it is right next to a gate which I use twice a day, every day. Eventually my luck will run out, and I will have a fat body part for a week, which is tedious.
 

Cabinetman

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An old guy showed me how to kill a wasps nest and it would probably work for hornets as well, literally just pour diesel into the hole – it was underground, and that’s it, no fire or anything.
with regard to your hornets nest I would be thinking remote-control somehow with a sprayer full of diesel – but you are definitely on your own with this one.
 

okeydokey

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I can wholeheartedly recommend a wasp nest destroyer foam spray, comes out like shaving foam at force to about 3 metres distant and sticks to the target. Have used it for several years on the variety of wasps and hornets that seem to like our house and nearby hollow old tree. Will sort out your washing machine problem easily.
Is also good for leaning out of an upstairs window and squirting upwards to the entry gap between the gutter and house bricks (wear safety goggles) Nippon brand has been best for me
 

pe2dave

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You should see my tool shed roof - hundreds of nests built cheek-by-jowl. I leave them where they are because of the myth that wasps won't build next to an old nest, but it does seem to be a myth. Current excitement is a hornets' nest in an old washing machine in the scrap heap. They have 4 holes to go in and out, so I am perplexed as to how to approach and "deal" with it. If I spray into one hole, hornets will pour out of the other three and we will all have a difficult day. I'm thinking high pressure and distance, and a lot of insecticide. I wouldn't bother but it is right next to a gate which I use twice a day, every day. Eventually my luck will run out, and I will have a fat body part for a week, which is tedious.
Guy who treated mine (air vent, lots of holes) blocked up all but one, sprayed it under pressure, and ran. Suggest same approach for your washing machine?
 

Terrytpot

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I am perplexed as to how to approach and "deal" with it. If I spray into one hole, hornets will pour out of the other three and we will all have a difficult day. I'm thinking high pressure and distance, and a lot of insecticide.
That tickled me..when dealing with mothers uninvited squatters I had similar concerns so I raided my remaining stock of military equipment and donned full Black alert level NBC clothing…smock over trousers with inner and outer gloves topped off with my respirator worn inside the smocks hood. Hot day it was too..sweated like a rapist in a brothel but none of the little turds got me 😗
 

WoodchipWilbur

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Had a wonderful time with my father some 60 years ago... We had a large wasp nest (in the region of 3ft long) in a roof space. They were eating too much of the orchard, so it had to go. He rigged himself up in some home-made bee-keeping gear; rubber gloves, tucked-in sleeves and trousers - and Mother's diaphenous nylon nightie over a broad-brimmed hat. I was similarly attired and equipped with a hypodermic full of antihistamine. (Father was a GP)
All was well - no stings.
But my sister never forgave us. This was the day she brought her first-ever serious boyfriend to visit.
 
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