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Kierri

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Bit of a repeat post, I'm sure... But please help me... I haven't touched the scroll saw in years - long, boring story - and now I'm looking to buy blades and start up again...

Where is the best place to buy blades in the UK? It's hard to buy in bulk from the US when you're not sure what you need. I think I'm down with the blade numbers... But what I'm asking is... What is the best TYPE of blade?

When I cut a simple cross once, it was with a Modified Geometry blade and it was either the blade or a fluke, but it cut amazing, even in my hands. But what about SKIP Tooth and Double Skip Tooth? Reverse? And now some even newer types. And then... What is the best brand of blades?

Give me your suggestions, so I have some idea on what to buy and where to buy it. I've tried a couple, but never know if it's me or the blade.... Please help a scatter brained fool?

Thanks,

Kierri
 

Droogs

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The blade you use is entirely subjective. Personally I love Pegas blades in general. most of my sawing is with blades in the 0s but I do on occasion go up to a 5 depending on how thick the subject is. Get a selection from axi and just see how you go. You may end up using a 5 for a particular type/thickness of wood and someone else may prefer a 3 or a 7

it is generally suck it an' see depepnding on style
hth
 

AES

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+1 for Droogs' post above. Axminster Tools are the UK distributor for Pegas, and like him, I like them a lot, though there are other good ones too. In general, don't bother with DIY store offerings (usually much too coarse) unless you get lucky.

I also use the Pegas Modified Geometry blades a lot, usually sizes No. 2 (very fine, only used sometime), 3 & 5 (mostly), 7 (sometimes), and 12 (bought by accident but useful for REALLY thick stuff). I too use my scroll saw for a lot of typically non-scroll saw work!

On their web site Axi should have a table of all the blades Pegas make (including very fine metal cutting blades, which I also use) plus various others for a lot of different purposes, including hand sawing (coping saw, etc). If Axi don't have that chart send me a PM, I have it, it's about 3 or 4 pages, but in .pdf format.

HTH
 

Claymore

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Hi Kierri, lovely to hear from again! I still using the Pegas blades my main ones are number 3 skip blades for my Intarsia.
Cheers
Brian
 

Kierri

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Claymore! I have often thought of you!

I've tried the Pegas from Axminster, they seem to do the job, although I'm still confused with the different type of blades. Modified geometry, precision ground, super double tooth and now super hook or something? When I try to cut something, I seem to need a bigger blade than everyone else. So I'm struggling a bit.

I'm also stuck with where to find wood. A very nice fellow brought me a bag of off cuts, many years ago now and they're too hard for me to cut on the scroll saw. I think they are hardwoods and some 1-3inch thick. Perhaps I should add a bandsaw to my shop?

I have an inch thick piece of beech too, no idea what to do with it. Why does the saw have such a big vertical capacity, if it can't cut even 44mm softwood?

Anyway, it's good to be back in the fold and I'm trying to learn and resist the urge to accept I'm rubbish and give up. This time, I'm gonna master it! :D

Xx
 

Aquachiefofficer

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Type in the following for a Pegasus selection chart:

carbatec.com.au/documents/Pegas%20web.pdf

Sorry I can't cut and paste the link on my Ipad.
Regards, Paul
 

whatknot

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I usually recommend watching the following youtube video and part two of the same

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06Kf9h2CXJ0

It does not cover modified geometry blades, and frankly I haven't tried them as yet to pass comment as find reverse skip tooth do most of what I need

But it covers the main types and differences

Do they keep bringing up new varieties of blades to keep up buying? I wonder at times

I would also recommend Axminster for Pegas blades

Supply of wood is always a problem in the UK I find, but I try and reuse or recycle for most things
 

AES

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To add to my post above, I've just remembered that you CAN now post .pdf s here (I forgot that)! So here's the blades charts I downloaded from Pegas themselves - they may or may not be the same as the one linked to above, dunno:

View attachment Pegas Scroll Blades Wood Rev etc Blades.pdf

View attachment Pegas Multi-Scroll Blades.pdf

View attachment Pegas Multi Scroll Blades.pdf

View attachment Pegas Metal Scroll Blades.pdf

And another, not specific to Pegas, about blade selection, that I got from a mag I think:

View attachment No_Fail_Blade_Chart_206122387.pdf

Can I add a BUT to those charts however (2 BUTS actually):

1. Personally I like Pegas, and if you're in UK, they're easy to get (Axminster Tools, as said above). But there are other brands including Niqua (I think these can be bought from Hegner in UK), and several others whose names I forget off hand (but mainly importing by post from the USA though);

and:

2. I think you may well be worrying a bit too much about blade selection (natural enough if you're still getting to grips with scrolling - I did the same). But basically, just about all blades will cut (when the tension is right), with the only real differences between them all being A) longevity, B) speed of cut, and C) finish of the cut (edges). These all vary anyway, as per the material/s you're cutting of course.

But those things are less important to start off with IMO. When you can reliably cut to -; to the L or R of -; or can split a line down the middle (both curved and straight); and when you can turn sharp corners well, only THEN need you start "worrying" about "details" of how long the cut/s took, and how much sanding you need to do after finishing the cut (ideally nil).

And about blade longevity, that's hardly important IMO, as even good blades are pretty cheap really.

Anyway, HTH, and no disrespect intended.
 

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donwatson

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I find Hobbies as a good source for blades in the UK.
They sell Olson and Niqua. I have been trying out the Niqua lately ( I bought the full range) and haven't found any major differences in their use.
Whatever blades you use needs a bit of trial and error IMHO
www.alwayshobbies.com

Don W
PS Possibly the Niqua (yellow pack blades) could be cheaper.
 

whatknot

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Flying Dutchman are Niqua , the name bandied about a lot in the USA

Personally I did not think a lot of Olson blades, I much prefer Pegas
 

Droogs

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Remember, you don't need to run the machine at full pelt. Turn it down until it is moving at roughly the same speed as a handheld fret saw would if you were using it. then just practice on simple shapes and curves gradually increasing the speed. For myself i found that as the wood got thinner it was harder to be accurate and controlled. Practice with 20mm(ish) oak and pine and then try following a shape on some veneer and see the difference thickness and speed of blade makes.

You will get the hang of it and just have fun. Who cares if you go through £10 of blades and have rubble to show for it, it's a learning experience.
With regard to wood when walking about check for skips and see what's inside :)

hth
 

Claymore

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Totally agree about the speed i keep mine at around 1/4 of the full speed and it basically gives you time to manoeuvre the wood without it running away with ya so making tight turns in thicker wood is much easier also just put as much pressure as you need for the blade to start removing wood and it stops the blade bending and going slower actually speeds the job up.
Cheers
Brian
 

AES

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FWIW I also agree about speed - my machine is rarely above roughly half speed, and often it's VERY slow (especially when cutting thin sheet metal and veneer-thickness wood). Apart from first try outs I don't think I've ever cut anything with my saw set at max speed.

AND agree 100% - have fun!
 
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