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Biscuits & Kitchen Worktops

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Anonymous

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Hi All,

I was fitting the kitchen worktop on Sunday I had mentioned a week or two ago. My new DW626 router made an easy job of cutting the joints. I cut the bolt recesses and the slots for the biscuits. I then came to the problem of how to get the worktop in with the biscuits fitted. Each section of worktop was butted up against a wall.

In the end I got round it by slotting the biscuits in as the worktop was being tilted up/down. This wasn't ideal as it strained the biscuits and the slots.

Am I missing something or is it impossible to get biscuits in when faced with certain kitchen shapes?

BTW. The 626 is ten times better than the only other 1/2in router I've used which was hired from HSS. It seems like it will have no problems in the table with larger raised panel bits.

Dave
 

DaveL

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Anonymous AKA Dave":3nlu4igx said:
Hi All,

Am I missing something or is it impossible to get biscuits in when faced with certain kitchen shapes?

Dave
No you not missing anything.....apart from logging in :wink: :roll: :wink:
 

Aragorn

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Hi Dave
Just dropping the worktop in at a tilt is quite normal. The worktop should be a few millimetres short of the overall length to allow for good adjustment (the gap is covered by the backsplash/tiles/sealant).
As in any biscuit joinery, the biscuits are only there as a guide to help align the surfaces, they do not make much differene in terms of the strength of the joint. If you base units are good and level and the worktops aren't warped, you can get away without them just fine.

Cheers
Aragorn
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Dave,

sorry for appearing as you. I can never be bothered with logging in. I was surprised when I was able to start a new thread without logging in first.

Aragorn, I knew the biscuits were primarily for alignment but that was the whole point. I suppose next time I could use smaller biscuits. Tilting the worktop wasn't too bad as I was only dealing with one metre lengths but it wouldn't have been so easy with a three metre piece.

I suppose next time I'll have to convince people not to buy built in appliances.

Cheers for the info,

Dave
(DaveJester)(not Jester who would never lurk about as Jester anyway)
 

johnelliott

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This is a subject that interests me, as I do a lot of kitchen stuff (for a living). One of the things I don't like about biscuits is their total lack of adjustability.
In the future I shall be trying to arrange the join to be over an open part ofthe carcases, and to screw a piece of birch ply maybe 50mm wide to the underside of the piece of worktop fitted first so that 25mm sticks out, then fit the other piece and screw the ply to that as well. Then, if any adjustment is needed undo the screws on the low side and insert shims before tightening the screws again. That and the clamps should do it, and no need to raise the other end of the worktop to get it in
John
 

Aragorn

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Hi John
I've used this exact same method on worktops when I need to level out any front-to-back warping in the worktop (which seems to happen far too often in my opinion). I usually use a fairy sturdy piece of hardwood across the worst part of the misalignment.
Seems to work well. Like you say - biscuits are often useless!

Aragorn
 
A

Anonymous

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in my brothers kitchen i chopped out the plaster at one end so i could get a slightly over length worktop in without having any gaps at the ends.

then i just filled the wall and painted.
 
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