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Big elm burr

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OldWood

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Poking around in a workshop sale recently I found a large elm burr in perfect condition - possible 50+ kg and over a metre long. So 'huge' might be a better classification.

I now have it home and am realising that "eyes are bigger than stomach" - and how do I handle it? Literally with two of us but metaphorically ?

In reality I'm thinking this would be best as a sell on to a veneer manufacturer as without significant experience in getting the best out of such a piece, it could so easily be wasted, and - ummmm - I don't have a big enough lathe. :D :D

Can anyone give guidance please.
Rob
 

TheTiddles

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Decide what you want to make, then work out a process for how to do it.

Otherwise, just put it somewhere dry till you’ve worked it out

Aidan
 

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Surely the simplest solution is to buy that really big lathe you've had your eye on?
 

OldWood

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TheTiddles":28ck9kgn said:
Decide what you want to make, then work out a process for how to do it.

Otherwise, just put it somewhere dry till you’ve worked it out

Aidan
At over 1 metre by 0.7 and 0.45 high, and weighing over 60kgs it's not something to be just :lol: 'put somewhere'. :lol:
I hadn't realised that all veneer comes in from abroad now - ther's no veneer manufacturers in the UK now as that was the market I thought it could go into.
 

AJB Temple

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Dimension it, then put it on a bandsaw such that you can cut some veneers and boxes out of it yourself.

Or offer it for sale on here.
 

Suffolkboy

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Chainsaw?

Forklift?

Cargo straps to make hand holds and a couple of mates?
 

OldWood

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AJB Temple":2qv68x7r said:
PS: Elm moves like it is still alive.
Can you expand on that a bit please. I've turned small burrs into bowls and never had any problems and would have thought that there's little likeihood of significant moisture in this big one now.

I do have one turned flat bowl in wych elm that has moved a bit but accept that I may not have let that dry long enough as others have been perfectly ok. And then chait seats were traditionally made in elm and I've never seen oneof them move.
Rob
 

OldWood

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AJB Temple":1za8szoh said:
Dimension it, then put it on a bandsaw such that you can cut some veneers and boxes out of it yourself.

Or offer it for sale on here.



I'm up for offers but postage is going to bit costly!! :lol: :lol:
Rob
 

AJB Temple

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Re it moving.

I have done a couple of floors in well seasoned elm in a former house I had. Thick boards. The amount of movement I experienced was noticeably more than with oak elsewhere in the same house. I doubt you would notice it in small pieces.

I also used some to repair tapered plank backs in an antique chest that someone had managed to put a fork lift prong through. That was done to match existing boards, and was hand cut to about 3/8" thick. Despite being dry and well seasoned, that also managed to move significantly. It can be beautiful wood but stability is not my personal experience with it. It used to be used a lot for coffins I believe. Movement then was mostly downwards.

In your case I would still dimension it into usable pieces, if I have understood your sizing correctly.
 
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