• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Best vintage Chisels

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
20,112
Reaction score
1,478
Location
Derbyshire
talking of treacle tins , remember when they were mugs and kettles for tea , over a brazier?
We had white enamel billy cans or "snap cans" with a cup on top. Bring your own with some tea leaves in it and somebody would take them off and bring them back at 12 filled with boiling water.
 

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
20,112
Reaction score
1,478
Location
Derbyshire
Sounds like you were never the apprentice.
Builders labourer - one of my many early career moves. A lot of digging with pick shovel and barrow. JCBs weren't that common back then. Concrete mixers hand loaded, ready mix hadn't been invented. Bricks and cements unloaded by hand. Fork lift trucks weren't that common either! Did do some shuttering joinery just as a labourer.
 
Last edited:

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
20,112
Reaction score
1,478
Location
Derbyshire
Back on topic! Not for long I presume.
Couldn't load pictures in intended order so this looks a but confused:

Best vintage chisel, not this one a Narex paring:

IMG_4216.JPG


Heavy crude and thick
IMG_4217.JPG


Compare contrast with two old paring chisels
IMG_4218.JPG


This a 1 1/4 " paring, very fine but but very short - years of use worn out and new old handle. Not a lot of use so ended up as a putty knife. Sorry C Taylor!
IMG_4204.JPG


This a 1" paring A Hildick "Diamic" with War Dept bench mark 1944. My birth year! A very fine chisel and a pleasure to use, 2/3rd the weight of the same size length 1" Narex and much thinner
IMG_4206.JPG

all 3 together. Narex a clumsy lump in comparison to the other two
IMG_4202.JPG
IMG_4212.JPG
 
Last edited:

TRITON

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2014
Messages
1,143
Reaction score
582
Location
Sunny Glasgow
I've a favoured old chisel I usually use on dovetails. It's got no makers mark I can see, probably honed off years ago, all i can make out is Sheffield Cast Steel. its 1" by about 2 1/2-3mm thick for much of it, oak handle. I love it because I can get it very very sharp.
I've a tendency to put really shallow angles on it to utilize its super sharp ability, but that doesn't last long so I use it really just for hand paring.
Its about 10" overall, with 3 1/2" of blade
 

JobandKnock

Amateur curmudgeon
Joined
14 Apr 2021
Messages
568
Reaction score
289
Location
Lancashire
JCBs weren't that common back then. Concrete mixers hand loaded, ready mix hadn't been invented.
JCBs really took off in the1960s, things like the Manitou site FLT probably 1980s. You're showing your age!

Bricks and cements unloaded by hand.
I can remember that. If you went onto a site as a chippy you'd often be asked to make up knocking up tables or floats (and even hawks) for the plasterers (they often had their own handles in lime wood), whilst the brickies always seemed to need spot boards or maybe even a hod or two to be made out of plywood. All good apprentice tasks
 
Last edited:

workshopted

Established Member
Joined
15 Nov 2016
Messages
158
Reaction score
124
Location
bristol
We had white enamel billy cans or "snap cans" with a cup on top. Bring your own with some tea leaves in it and somebody would take them off and bring them back at 12 filled with boiling water.
I do so remember those, Jacob, but I didn't know that you can still buy them.
Untitled.jpg
 

workshopted

Established Member
Joined
15 Nov 2016
Messages
158
Reaction score
124
Location
bristol
Back on topic! Not for long I presume.
Couldn't load pictures in intended order so this looks a but confused:

Best vintage chisel, not this one a Narex paring:

View attachment 117982

Heavy crude and thick
View attachment 117983

Compare contrast with two old paring chisels
View attachment 117984

This a 1 1/4 " paring, very fine but but very short - years of use worn out and new old handle. Not a lot of use so ended up as a putty knife. Sorry C Taylor!
View attachment 117985

This a 1" paring A Hildick "Diamic" with War Dept bench mark 1944. My birth year! A very fine chisel and a pleasure to use, 2/3rd the weight of the same size length 1" Narex and much thinner
View attachment 117986
all 3 together. Narex a clumsy lump in comparison to the other two
View attachment 117987View attachment 117988
Some nice old brand names there.
 

cowtown_eric

Established Member
Joined
4 May 2006
Messages
72
Reaction score
37
Location
Calgary Alberta Canada
This discussion has educated me substantially. Here in the western Canadas a house made 100 years ago is celebrated if it still stands,

And the knowledge of the tools and skills to repair and maintain them is rapidly fading.

Eric
Enoying my #makerspace......protospace.ca
 

TRITON

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2014
Messages
1,143
Reaction score
582
Location
Sunny Glasgow
Took another closer look at the few older chisels ive got, I've a total of 4.
1. As above, can only read 'Sheffield Cast Steel' 1" firmer
2. J.Howarth 3/4" firmer
3. I can just make out Marples on it, 3/4" bevel
4. A gouge 3/4"(maybe less actual cutting size) and I can make Hooper's, something below that but illegible.- Maybe make out a POR,possible T, but the rest is gone.
All appear to be cast steel
The last one (No4) I've never heard of. anyone ?

I'll get some pics up soonish, just lining some small windows on my Cat Bothy.
 
Last edited:
Top