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dannyr

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But having said that, these 22 inch Moulson Bros could easily become my new favourites. Told you I was fickle... Grin!
View attachment 117607
Lovely stuff .. I give the Howarth the prize, but only by a whisker.

And yes, I may just clean the blade and keep the string.

Why not start an ongoing 'show us your chisels thread' for us nutters, sorry aficionados.
 
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Phil Pascoe

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I give the Howarth the prize, but only by a whisker.
Why not start an ongoing 'show us your chisels thread' for us nutters, sorry aficionados.
 

D_W

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How dare you fish for our chisels lol. I`ve never heard of Nurse.
I've got a Nurse plane and a large Nurse paring chisel. I believe there may have been more than one of them (sorry if I don't actually know that much about the different makers - I just like the tools and not much of a retro reader). But I think I may have one marked I.Nurse and one C.Nurse. Too lazy to go dig in the piles and see if I can find both.

I think they were sellers of tools, not sure they were actually makers. I've seen Nurse on saws, too.
 

cowtown_eric

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That fine style of chisel turns up quite often but I tend to see them as worn-out paring chisels which originally had blades much longer. Another clue is that they often have replacement handles as this one has, the original probably having been wrecked by many years of use.
Just a guess, I could be wrong.
Well I dunno if it's "oldtools marketing hyperbole" or not, but the shorter/wider chisels are often referred to as sash ( ?-makers/repairers?) chisels As for being worn-out, a lot of these chisels had laminated blades were the edge was harder steel, and as long as you can see that (might take a real close look) they ain't worn out.

As for my fav's, I'm partial to Erik Antonberg swedish chisels. In the truck I have red-plastic up to 2", in the shop I have wooden socket "bergs"

Eric in the colonies.
 

Jacob

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Well I dunno if it's "oldtools marketing hyperbole" or not, but the shorter/wider chisels are often referred to as sash ( ?-makers/repairers?) chisels
I've heard of sash pocket chisels but never seen one.
Sash Pocket Chisels – William Marples and Sons, Ltd.
but not sash chisel, though there are sash mortice chisels whose use is obvious
As for being worn-out, a lot of these chisels had laminated blades were the edge was harder steel, and as long as you can see that (might take a real close look) they ain't worn out.
I meant worn short , not worn out. They have exactly the same geometry, and laminated like a paring chisel of the same era, but are much shorter. I've got a couple of these both with replacement handles, which suggests years of use, which in turn suggests probably worn short. Just guessing though.
I've made hundreds of sash windows (period copies) but never really found a use for these short paring or sash(?) chisels though I used a blunt one as a putty knife for many years
 

workshopted

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I've heard of sash pocket chisels but never seen one.
Sash Pocket Chisels – William Marples and Sons, Ltd.
but not sash chisel, though there are sash mortice chisels whose use is obviousI meant worn short , not worn out. They have exactly the same geometry, and laminated like a paring chisel of the same era, but are much shorter. I've got a couple of these both with replacement handles, which suggests years of use, which in turn suggests probably worn short. Just guessing though.
I've made hundreds of sash windows (period copies) but never really found a use for these short paring or sash(?) chisels though I used a blunt one as a putty knife for many years
Did someone mention sash pocket chisels? Grin!
1631522104255.jpeg
 

workshopted

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Lovely stuff .. I give the Howarth the prize, but only by a whisker.

And yes, I may just clean the blade and keep the string.

Why not start an ongoing 'show us your chisels thread' for us nutters, sorry aficionados.
I think you were right the first time, Danny. I've often been called a nutter - but never an aficionado.
 

workshopted

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Impressed!
Are they thin? Have you tried using one to cut a sash pocket? Just wondering how useful they are.
Yes, Jacob, but many years ago - they're the right tool for the job. just trying to find a pic for you to see how thin they are.
 

dannyr

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Did someone mention sash pocket chisels? Grin!
View attachment 117668
Were the sash pocket chisels used to cut the opening in the fairly thin side frame wood that gives access to the rope and counterweight? I'm not a much experienced expert like some of you, but I was repairing our double sashed window in this room (sash shutter inside sash window C1890) -- so eight counterweights and one got hung up on a snag so I had to cut an access hole - used a wide auger, but sash pocket chisel might have been better.

And the plough/saw hybrid behind --- what's it called -- looks a bit like a fancy stair saw, but is it for the starting guide cut for ripping a thin board?

Keep coming with your fine chisels and just as much the interesting tool related backgrounds .... appreciated.
 

Jacob

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Were the sash pocket chisels used to cut the opening in the fairly thin side frame wood that gives access to the rope and counterweight? .....
So it is said but I've removed 100s of old sashes and never seen a sash pocket obviously chiselled out - and they are easy to saw when making the pulley stiles.
They are also very uncommon, unlike sash mortice chisels, and I wonder if they are a bit specialised and perhaps just for those uncommon sash pockets cut into the inside lining, which are difficult to saw out and would then need a piece making up to fit the hole neatly.
 

Steve Beck

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I have an inquiry for you Brits.
I am a user of many Record planes in my shop. My favorite chisels are IBC made in Canada. I have been using Marples blue handled chisels for general purpose tasks for many years. They are a good serviceable chisel and hold an edge pretty good.
Now my inquiry:
What is the steel that Marples used for the older blue handled chisels?
I have "googled it and really can not come up with any answer.
I suspect it may be a high carbon steel.
 

johnnyb

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I can photo a sash pocket thats obviously been chiseled tomorrow. pulley lining are pretty chunky tbh 1 inch normally. I think they chopped a vee about half way. Well have a look tomorrow. what I will say is the pockets still seat and fit superbly well. no screws nails or owt needed.
 

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workshopted

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I can photo a sash pocket thats obviously been chiseled tomorrow. pulley lining are pretty chunky tbh 1 inch normally. I think they chopped a vee about half way. Well have a look tomorrow. what I will say is the pockets still seat and fit superbly well. no screws nails or owt needed.
1631610119290.png
 

workshopted

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Were the sash pocket chisels used to cut the opening in the fairly thin side frame wood that gives access to the rope and counterweight? I'm not a much experienced expert like some of you, but I was repairing our double sashed window in this room (sash shutter inside sash window C1890) -- so eight counterweights and one got hung up on a snag so I had to cut an access hole - used a wide auger, but sash pocket chisel might have been better.

And the plough/saw hybrid behind --- what's it called -- looks a bit like a fancy stair saw, but is it for the starting guide cut for ripping a thin board?

Keep coming with your fine chisels and just as much the interesting tool related backgrounds .... appreciated.
Right first time, Danny. It's what I know as an English style staircase saw.
1631610704552.jpeg
 
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