Quantcast

Best flat/matt paint for underworks of pine bench.

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Benchwayze

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
9,146
Reaction score
1
Location
West Muddylands
Hi folks
I have some SY pine I need to use up. I thought of trying to catch 'passing trade' by leaving projects on view on my drive.

First project a pine bench with painted legs and aprons. Never used this technique, so has any one any suggestions for suitable finishes for the legs. I want a matt finish but I am unsure about emulsion. Johnstones have some nice dark colours

Ideas really welcome.

John (hammer)
 

MikeG.

Damocles.
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,172
Reaction score
645
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
Without hesitation, Bedec Multi Surface Paint..........microporous, water-based, flexible, and incredibly durable. I've got to the point where I wouldn't consider anything else.
 

Benchwayze

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
9,146
Reaction score
1
Location
West Muddylands
Thanks Mike. I'll go to my old 'stomping ground' in Hockley. Bound to source it there. Any thing from an elephant to a safety pin!
John (hammer)
 

ED65

Established Member
Joined
3 Dec 2015
Messages
3,593
Reaction score
0
You want matt and durable: milk paint. Dead-flat finish and durable as all get out. This stuff is so famously tough that it can resist weathering for decades (think red barns in the US) and it defeats most chemical strippers.
 

Benchwayze

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
9,146
Reaction score
1
Location
West Muddylands
Isn't that the stuff they use for shabby chic furniture? Also the stuff the Shakers used a lot of. I don't want to make shabby chic! I just cannot bring myself to wittingly damage a piece of woodwork I have just finished . I will leave that to the person who hopefully buys the item . All the same I will check it out. Thanks for the information.

John (hammer)
 

ED65

Established Member
Joined
3 Dec 2015
Messages
3,593
Reaction score
0
Benchwayze":1rnr2m27 said:
Isn't that the stuff they use for shabby chic furniture?
Isn't that largely chalk paint? Milk paint is not to be confused with chalk paint; both very matt, but polar opposites in terms of toughness.
 

Jacob

Established Member
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
16,119
Reaction score
0
Location
Derbyshire
If you are expecting to leave benches outside there is only one option; Alback Linseed oil paint. Not cheap per tin but phenomenal coverage and very easy to apply. Avoid water based anything, ignore "microporous" it means nothing - all paint is microporous to a degree.
 

Benchwayze

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
9,146
Reaction score
1
Location
West Muddylands
Thanks Jacob. The furniture isn't intended to be left outside though I quite agree with regard to the weathering properties of linseed oil paint. I do have some leftover from the days before I had UPVC window frames fitted. I think the colour was called Brown spice! Incidentally I have to re panel my garden gates and I have some barn paint for this job. All I could get was an old-fashioned gallon. That will probably last me until I get the birthday card from Buck House!
Cheers
John (hammer)
 

Starjump

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2017
Messages
77
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
Garage floor paint is tough stuff, cheap too! 'Toolstation' are selling one for £37 for 5 litres. It is oil based stuff that thins down with white spirit. It is one option anyway.
On the other end of the scale, yacht paints are great for hardwearing outdoor use, single pack and two-pack are available, complete paint systems including primers and undercoats etc, - not cheap though.
 

ED65

Established Member
Joined
3 Dec 2015
Messages
3,593
Reaction score
0
Jacob tunnel vision alert!

Again, think red barns; milk paint has 'rather a good track record' in exterior use (which is a bit like saying Nasa are a bit good at maths).

Anyone interested might also like to look up French flour paint.
 

Marineboy

Established Member
Joined
11 Mar 2016
Messages
526
Reaction score
0
Location
Northumberland
Jacob":1czrh5zp said:
If you are expecting to leave benches outside there is only one option; Alback Linseed oil paint. Not cheap per tin but phenomenal coverage and very easy to apply. Avoid water based anything, ignore "microporous" it means nothing - all paint is microporous to a degree.
Sorry, but that is just wrong. I am no expert in the finer points of paint chemistry but I do know that water based paint has improved tremendously over the last few years. I painted my outdoor bench and bird tables with Bedec 2 years ago and they’re as good now as when I did them. Water based means no smell and no messy clean up with expensive solvents.
 

Jacob

Established Member
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
16,119
Reaction score
0
Location
Derbyshire
2 years isn't very long, though it's lasting better than some I've experienced! I'd expect your paint to start failing eventually, certainly within 4 years or so - lifting off and letting water in below.
I'm no expert either but I've been restoring/replacing trad joinery since 1986 and in the trade before that and my experience of various modern paints/systems has often been embarrassingly disastrous.
n.b. Linseed oil paints also have (almost) no smell i.e. no VOCs, and need no solvents.
 
Top