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Ruth

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Hi everyone, my name is Ruth and I'm hoping to pick your brains please.

My step-mom is looking for a new hobby and has expressed an interest towards woodturning. My Dad has today brought her a lathe for xmas and I would like to get her some books to help her on her way. Would anybody be able to recommend good books for a newbie?

Any advise would be appreciated!

Thanks, Ruth.
 

Haldane

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Hi

Keith Rowley's woodturning a foundation course is well thought of by most people, I also enjoyed Jimmy Clewes DVD Turnaround which is good for beginers and covers most of the basic areas needed


Dave
 

Silverbirch

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Hi Ruth
Welcome to the forum!
My first choice would be "Two In One Woodturning" by Phil Irons. I has nice modern presentation, is very well illustrated and features a range of projects, with step by step instructions, from simple to more demanding.
Whatever you choose, and I`m sure others will be along shortly with other suggestions, you probably won`t find them in your local bookshop. Having said that, the book I`ve mentioned is one of the few that you do tend to see on the shelves.

Ian
 

CHJ

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Welcome to the forum Ruth, best by far in my opinion is Keith Rowley's Book-A Foundation course
Good advice on safety aspects of holding and using the tools and a selection of simple turning exercises that if worked through will stand her in good stead for moving on.
 

Ruth

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Thanks for the advice and the warm welcome to the forum, I will be pointing my step-mom in this direction for any help and advice she needs!

I will go and have a look at those books.

Thanks again.
 

nev

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hello and welcome,
i have both of the above mentioned books and my vote would be for the keith rowley foundation course, it explains simply and clearly all you need to know to get started, while the phil irons one has a few more starter projects in it.
I have been turning for almost a year now and the only instruction i have ever received is from this forum and keith rowleys book, both a very worthwhile investment :)
 

petercharlesfagg

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Your stepmother is not only fortunate in having a stepdaughter who is willing to get involved but also to have an interest in woodturning!

As a stepfather I envy the lady!

The book by Rowley is about the best investment any budding turner can make, it is how I started all those years ago.

Regards Peter.
 

OldWood

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Ruth
The club I'm a member of has had such a rush of new members that we've had to set up a Train the Trainers course. This thread will roll for several days by which time I hope the club webmaster will have posted up the guidelines we are using, and I will post the link for that. One of the things that was discussed there was books and the feeling was the Rowley's book is now going out of date in that it was written before the scroll chuck was universally available and used. He only mentions it's use in passing, not referring at all to it in use.

His tool guidance is good, but a strong recommendation goes to a more up-to-date book, Mike Darlow's "Fundamentals of Woodturning".

I would add to that Richard Raffan's book "Turning Projects". And there is also the Woodturning monthly magazine

Please be aware that one cannot really learn wood turning in isolation and that your step-mum needs to look for an active local club or be prepared to go on a course. What she learns from either of these will be backed up by a book.

There is also the other little factors that need to be known right at the beginning and that like many hobbies, the start up costs are quite high in terms of tools and ancillary equipment. Unless you have access to a club, or another turner, who has equipment she will require a grinder for tool sharpening, and then she'll fancy a bandsaw for the initial shaping of wood, and a bench drill is useful ..... and so on. I discovered some time back that to take up a new hobby with reasonable commitment involves a layout of around £1000 - don't be put off by that as it can be spread over quite a time period, unlike say sub-aqua where you need to spend that to begin with.

As others have said, well done in coming here as I think this is the prime wood turning forum in the UK, and is full of like-minded people who are very supportive on new turners.

Rob
 

lugo35

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woodturning -a fresh approach. not sure of the auther tho. great book
 

chipmunk

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"Woodturning - A Fresh Approach" is by Robert Chapman. GMC publishers.

I'd recommend joining a club near you. You'll meet lots of people willing to help you learn, be able to watch demonstrations by professionals, and learn by watching different techniques you can then try to emulate in your own workshop.

With practice, it'll come.

Jon
 

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