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inaspin

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Hi
For a while now i have been using abranet for my wood turning and i am not sure that i am getting the best results from it. In fact a few times i have found myself saying it was ok before i started sanding ( yes talking to myself a lonely life woodturning).

I have googled abrasives and of course every manufacturer is offering the best option and its all getting a bit mind blowing, so i was wondering what experiences you guys have had and basically what abrasive you could not live without.

It is expensive stuff now and i can't afford to keep buying until i find the best one, hope you don't think this is a bit of a cheek and any advise will be gratefully received.

Also the name of a reasonably good priced supplier would be good.

Regards
Berns
 

gus3049

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inaspin":2c1msc04 said:
Hi
For a while now i have been using abranet for my wood turning and i am not sure that i am getting the best results from it. In fact a few times i have found myself saying it was ok before i started sanding ( yes talking to myself a lonely life woodturning).

I have googled abrasives and of course every manufacturer is offering the best option and its all getting a bit mind blowing, so i was wondering what experiences you guys have had and basically what abrasive you could not live without.

It is expensive stuff now and i can't afford to keep buying until i find the best one, hope you don't think this is a bit of a cheek and any advise will be gratefully received.

Also the name of a reasonably good priced supplier would be good.

Regards
Berns
Richard at the Turner's Workshop.

http://www.turnersworkshop.co.uk/woodturnersupplies.html#Abrasive

Rhyno abrasive. Best stuff I have ever used. Its worth it for me to order from France. Richard is efficient and fair on postage and I recommend you order from him.
 

paulm

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I used to use standard blue J flex from Aximinster which is very good, but tried abranet for a while to see how that was.

Once I've finished the abranet I've already got I won't be getting any more. I find it too stiff and inflexible in the coarser grits and just generally don't feel comfortable with it, annoying to store too as it sticks to other bits and springs out of the plastic storage drawers.

I've got some of Richard's Rhyno stuff to try next and while I haven't used much of it yet first impressions are good with regard to flexibility and the cushioned back will be helpful too, especially for punching out circles for power sanding.

Cheers, Paul
 

CHJ

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There are or were two abrasive brands that I found most effective for my needs.

1. The Original Red Ryno brand Plain and Grip backed versions, I still have some left on my rolls in some grades, produces a sweet stream of dust with minimum pressure. I believe Richard has said that current versions of Red are not as good, I don't know until I try and procure some more.

2. VSM Vitex cloth , same as used on the Grip-A-Disc system.

The current White Ryno I find cuts very well but for the type of use I put it to it degrades very quickly, the increased flexibility is useful for some tasks but I find that it is very much a use once and throw away because the grit strips off the backing if handled roughly, not an altogether bad attribute for sanding if you are a purist but an expensive one.
Also in the smaller sizes as cut and used on a 50mm arbour the backing/felt interface is not up to holding it on the arbour in 80 grit because of the loads applied.

And Yes I do need that 80grit it's the tool with the least chatter associated when probing around inside my little boxes.

Abranet, I used quite a lot at first flush of discovery but it now just resides as a pick up when needed just like the Nyweb pads, can't define when the 'when' is, it just happens sometimes as appearing to be the best option.

I still have quite a stock of Blue Hermes J-Flex in various grades (courtesy of a Mark Hancock sell off).
Very robust and long lived from a backing and abrasive retention point of view but not quite as sharp as the Red Ryno. It has it's uses.

All are an expensive facet of turning if you are not too good on the tool control or play with wild woods, I'm fortunate in being in the position to splash out on bulk purchases from time to time which trims a bit off the totals over time.
 

gus3049

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CHJ":xuws1n8c said:
Also in the smaller sizes as cut and used on a 50mm arbour the backing/felt interface is not up to holding it on the arbour in 80 grit because of the loads applied.

And Yes I do need that 80grit it's the tool with the least chatter associated when probing around inside my little boxes.
I'm definitely into wild woods (Wind in the Willows is my favourite book!!!)

I use the 80 grit all the time at the moment as I have a load of wood that has been left out too long and is orf dear. But..... whilst I wouldn't dream of disagreeing with Chas on any woodturning subject, I have to say that I have never had the white Rhyno come off the arbour unless I get a hard catch on an edge or similar. I mostly use a cordless drill but have used a big old mains Bosch on occasion and the paper stood up to all the abuse I could throw at it. I use a Hope arbour.

Maybe I need to develop some muscle. :?
 

CHJ

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gus3049":3j26leda said:
.......Maybe I need to develop some muscle. :?
It's not due to applying a lot of pressure through use of muscle Gordon, I try to use the lowest pressure possible when sanding, had too many close calls with yew and the like when I first started to know not to add too much friction to the mix.

Perhaps it's the particular roll sample of 80 I have, it won't stay on the 50mm heads (Hope?) from Richard, does better on the 75mm but they won't go in some of my boxes.

Get some better results using it (80g) on a no-brand head with finer hooks, the other grades are fine.

Was interested to try it and see if it would cut the costs, but will basically stick to the Grip-A-Discs as my go to work horse.

Was a great advocate of friction driven rotary sanding, and still use it at times but recently I spend a lot more time using a small low volt, low speed drill (ex 9.6V bosh battery driven) from a mains power source.
Much more controllable, better for the abrasive with reduced heat, better cutting and minimal dust propagation.
 

Jensmith

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+1 for Richards Rhyno abrasive. Last ages, flexible, not as harsh as others so it sands rather than scrapes. I use it for more than just woodturning and can't fault it.
 

inaspin

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Hi

May i say a big thank you to everyone for taking the time and trouble to reply to my post, i will be ordering some Ryno grip from Richard today it certainly seems to come highly reccomended.

Once again thank you

Regards
Berns
 

boysie39

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Jensmith":3ids4rf3 said:
+1 for Richards Rhyno abrasive. Last ages, flexible, not as harsh as others so it sands rather than scrapes. I use it for more than just woodturning and can't fault it.
Jeezs Jen ,and it doesnt hurt ,thats really good . :lol: :lol:
 

tekno.mage

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I mainly use RhynoRed as I find it lasts longer than the white Rhyno abrasive from Richard - the white is more flexible in the coarser grits, though which is useful for sanding things with lots of intricate bits. I also use Abranet and have not found it gives a worse surface than the Rhyno type abrasives, but I have found it sheds bits of grit more which means you need to be scrupulous in removing sanding dust and residue between grits to avoid scratches.

If you think your turnings look better before sanding maybe it's something to do with your sanding technique rather than the abrasives you use? In particular I've noticed that some woods look ok from the tool, but after sanding from 120 to 400 grit show up defects and tearout that were not so visible before. The solution to this problem is to make sure all the surface defects are removed with the coarsest grit - and don't be afraid to use 80 grit if required! It's better to start with a coarser grit than spend ages trying to remove defects with finer grits and end up over-heating the work. Also, don't press to hard when sanding, keep the paper moving all the time, and don't use worn-out abrasive.
 

Richard Findley

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Thanks all for your comments regarding my abrasive.

Just to give the full story, I used to use and sell the red Rhynogrip but my supplier suddenly changed their trading terms and I can no longer buy it at a competetive rate. I approached the manufacturer who wouldn't supply the red to me but offered me the white, known as Plusline. After giving it a thorough test in the workshop I decided it was the way to go.

It doesn't last as long as the red but is around 40% cheaper, and it certainly doesn't last 40% less long! The main thing that won it over for me though was the flexibility, even at 80grit. For the type of detailed spindle work I do it is ideal. I also cut my own discs for bowl work too.

As with everything I sell, I wouldn't sell it if I didn't use it myself, and I do, every day!

Thanks again for your recommendatons, it's nice to know when I'm doing something right!

Cheers

Richard
 

CHJ

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tekno.mage":36t5dj99 said:
I mainly use RhynoRed as I find it lasts longer than the white Rhyno abrasive from Richard - the white is more flexible in the coarser grits, though which is useful for sanding things with lots of intricate bits. I also use Abranet and have not found it gives a worse surface than the Rhyno type abrasives, but I have found it sheds bits of grit more which means you need to be scrupulous in removing sanding dust and residue between grits to avoid scratches.

If you think your turnings look better before sanding maybe it's something to do with your sanding technique rather than the abrasives you use? In particular I've noticed that some woods look ok from the tool, but after sanding from 120 to 400 grit show up defects and tearout that were not so visible before. The solution to this problem is to make sure all the surface defects are removed with the coarsest grit - and don't be afraid to use 80 grit if required! It's better to start with a coarser grit than spend ages trying to remove defects with finer grits and end up over-heating the work. Also, don't press to hard when sanding, keep the paper moving all the time, and don't use worn-out abrasive.
Well put Kym, think you just about nailed it on the sanding front.
 

bogmonster

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I will also give the Rhynogrip a try. I agree that the Abranet is too rigid and it does not last long - it works out quite expensive. Anyone know where I can get a punch for 50mm discs? I use the Simon Hope sanding pads and I am very pleased with them. Rather than cut circles with scissors I would rather punch out discs...had a quick scan and can't find anything...

Cheers, BM.

Actually had another look, is this what I need:

[url=http://www.powertooldirect.co...w.powertooldirect.co.uk/fprint ... 28375.html[/url]
 

paulm

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Got mine from here http://www.cromwell.co.uk/KEN5181599K

Noticed the one you linked to had been discontinued.

Gave it a bit of a hone on the outside edge and with the application of a small lump hammer (use a chopping board or waste wood underneath of course !), will cut through several layers of abrasives at once, brilliant and quite fun, I probably need to get out more :lol:

Cheers, Paul
 

János

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Hello,

Ask for resin bond, open or semi open coat abrasives, with flexible backing. Most manufacturers do make very similar products, with minor differences. Vitex, Mirka, Hermes, SIA... never mind.

I use waterproof sandpaper, made for car finishing. In most cases I start sanding at P180. Then follows P240, P320, P400. I seldom go beyond that. Some steel wool (be careful, tthough: it is dangerous to use on a spinning lathe!), foam backed sanding mat, like MicroMesh, for polishing ebony. And a piece of old linen cloth in itself :wink:

Have a nice day,

János
 
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