Beginner router table

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MikeK

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Thanks for the review Mark, I have the older triton router table(aha, no grub screws :D ) though i was thinking of changing to the more modern one as i liked the modern stand. But from your review, should I ever change, I'll look elsewhere.

I think the original Workcentre is a LOT better than the new version. I've only seen the original version on the Internet, but it looks sturdier.
 

Against_The_Grain

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As above, the OP is not looking for a cast iron, 400kg spindle moulder, but just a simple router table to run off bits and bobs from the sound of it.

Being the only one that suggested the spindle moulder thus far aside from @Spectric commenting on my post, I will guess this comment is pointed at me.

In my post, I mentioned "Lightweight spindle moulder such as a Kity 623" which is 70kg or thereabouts, nowhere near 400kg and still miles more versatile than any table router and takes up roughly the same floor space unless you go for a very compact table router which would defeat the objective of wanting to be able to raise panels as @Wilson joinery wishes to do. Though only a 2HP spindle moulder, it will outperform any router, even ones that claim to be over 3HP as a brushed motor simply does not output much torque as compared to an induction motor. Another factor to take into account is that the spindle moulder is at least half as quiet as a router during running, saving your ears and any agitation from the neighbours if any.

While they do have their place for particular work, I find people very often get drawn into the whole table router nonsense peddled by gizmo merchants which started in the '80s and '90s with the hobbyist woodworking magazines having table router plans in each issue, projects that you could make with your table router, gadgets that you could make for your table router but never actually use because they had no real use, and then above all adverts for router bits on every other page because the main sponsors of these magazines at the time were router bit salesmen. I imagine it's still much the same today only that they're trying to sell you table router setups now that cost several hundred if not over a thousand pounds rather than encouraging you to make your own from scraps of plywood to make a "miniature spindle moulder" as they were once known.

If the plan is to get more serious in the trade, get the more serious machine, it need not be a 400kg three-phase 8HP monster, something small, secondhand, and inexpensive like the Kity, or Scheppach, Elektra Beckum, et al... will be a much easier machine to live with than a table router, by a mile.
 

TRITON

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I will guess this comment is pointed at me.
It wasn't :LOL: i was just generalizing.
In fact i was going to go on about Incra systems and the other suggestions that members would recommend, mainly from their own skill and experience.
Which is understandable and probably relevant, as new member might not know of the options they have or whats out there or how better kit can make the job easier.
But it can be problematic for someone new to the game to only get suggestions that far outweigh their perceived needs, experience or budget.
We can all be guilty of being a bit forward in our suggestions, and some see general joinery more as wood engineering, cutting joints to the same standards we see in metal engineering, which can be a bit overblown to someone simply looking for advice on a £199 router table for diy jobs around the house.

But no. I wasn't directing the example at you in particular, and hadn't read every post, but was just taking the general of how these threads can pan out and have done in the past.

eg - Someone asks about a table saw they found in B&Q, for £99 and before you know it, people are suggesting 700 quid Mafell plunge saws.
 

Wilson joinery

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Thanks everyone some great discussion on this which is a real help for me. I’m actually doing some training with a cabinet maker up here in derwentside and he’s got a spindle moulder in his shop which also he says is really useful particularly for large mouldings (not sure how easy it would be to use one of these for raised panel doors?). I’ve had a quick look on the usual sale sites and there’s a Kity 627 local to me for £80 which seems a bargain price. All I’d be worried about is whether I could still buy cutters to fit into the original Kity block and if not whether I’d be able to fit a more modern block which would enable easier access to new cutters.
 

Against_The_Grain

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Thanks everyone some great discussion on this which is a real help for me. I’m actually doing some training with a cabinet maker up here in derwentside and he’s got a spindle moulder in his shop which also he says is really useful particularly for large mouldings (not sure how easy it would be to use one of these for raised panel doors?). I’ve had a quick look on the usual sale sites and there’s a Kity 627 local to me for £80 which seems a bargain price. All I’d be worried about is whether I could still buy cutters to fit into the original Kity block and if not whether I’d be able to fit a more modern block which would enable easier access to new cutters.

The Kity 627 is a more lightweight machine than the 623, I believe it sports a 20mm spindle rather than a more standard 30mm one. I know a lot of the Kity blocks are just standard pinned euro blocks which cutters are very easy to find for, alternatively a new block isn't particularly dear which with the right cutters will do some shallow panel raising but for deep panel raising you will need a more specialist block.
 

MikeJhn

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Made on a router table.
DSC01455.jpeg
 

Wilson joinery

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Hi Mikejhn the doors look great! I’m guessing you made the rails and stiles on the router too? Or were these done on a table saw?
 

Spectric

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I think it is good that everything is thrown into the pot even if exceeds what the OP is asking for because it will give him all the options and things he may not have thought about which can only be a good thing. If his thoughts are anything like mine when I first started then the spindle moulder was not even on the radar but it should have been, it is a very capable machine and offers abilities not met by the router table which does seem to get all the press.

For me the router table has done everything ask from it but maybe taking longer and a spindle would have done some of the jobs in a blink of an eye but the one thing that stands out with the spindle for me are the cheaper cutters and availability of custom profiles.

Also being presented with all the info and peoples experience even if " Someone asks about a table saw they found in B&Q, for £99 and before you know it, people are suggesting 700 quid Mafell plunge saws." is really great because it will make you stop and think. My line of thought would be how well can a £99 saw perform if that other saw is £700, but maybe if I spend £200 I will get something much better.
 

MikeJhn

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Hi Mikejhn the doors look great! I’m guessing you made the rails and stiles on the router too? Or were these done on a table saw?
Much easier on a router table, the router bits are a matching pair, personally I would not even consider making them on a table saw, why add the complication of multiple pass's.
 

TRITON

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I think the original Workcentre is a LOT better than the new version. I've only seen the original version on the Internet, but it looks sturdier.
Yeah id say so, and the legs are steel put in at an angle for stability. The only downside i see to it is the top is a bit thin and the weight of the router(especially the big 1/2"), i think would have a tendency to cause the top to concave slightly. Plus the top especially around the inserts leaves it a bit lumpy and prone to catching the leading edge of the workpiece.

Still, overall its not bad and better than no dedicated router table. I do like the on/off. That works well and is a big easy to hit button.
 

Spectric

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Mike, nice looking doors and shows what can be done with a router table, personally I would have used paint with less gloss such as eggshell but that is just my preference.
 

TomGW

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A bit of a coincidence, but I had been looking at this and now see that it’s another clone of the Rutland, or more probably more accurately, the same rebranded. Can’t be bad for £175.
 

TRITON

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A bit of a coincidence, but I had been looking at this and now see that it’s another clone of the Rutland, or more probably more accurately, the same rebranded. Can’t be bad for £175.
Watch the vid. He's put the fence adjustment bolts in upside down :LOL: the knobs go on top, not underneath.
 
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