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Bee Problem

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woodshavings

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I know some members of the Forum are bee keepers so I am hoping you can help.
Just recently, I have noticed the occasional bee coming into the workshop. As this seems to be getting more frequent, I investigated and found they seem to be building a nest in the footings of the workshop. I do not want to risk getting stung when working (they are not aggressive but accidents happen)

I will not kill them but would like to persuade them to build elsewhere. Any suggestions how to do this please.

Thanks,

John
 

Adam

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First check is if they are bees, and what type if they are....

A) Are they wasps (bright yellow black and white stripes)

B) Are they bumble bees, (big fluffy things)

C) Neither, quite small, not so distinct colour

Adam
 

woodshavings

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Hi Adam,
I think they are (c).
They're certainly not bumble bees and I don't think they are wasps.
I'll try to take a photo tomorrow if that helps.
John
 

Adam

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I think that's the worst - bees and wasps nest only last until the end of the summer. Bees unfortunately one moved in, A) stay put and B) if removed, the smell of honey/wax remains and others bees like to move in.

A photo would be handy.

Depending on access a beekeeper can remove colonies, but if it's inside a cavity wall - this normally requires removing some of the wall. A normal hive will probably have about 30-60lbs (30KG) of honey in it at the moment, possibly more. They are also at their peak population, around 25,000 to 35,000. They die off to some extent over the winter, although the more than plenty make it through to the spring!

On a brighter note, they don't really do much harm, although they sometimes attract mice in the winter, when the bees are clustered into a tight ball for warmth, and don't notice a mouse nest, (they don't hang around inthe spring though - or they'd be stung to death.

Adam
 

woodshavings

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Hi Neil,
The bees seem to have quitened down with very few in the workshop and at present, are not causing me a problem. I built a small extension on the outside of the workshop to house my chip/dust collector (Axminster ADE1100), it was the foundation of this that the bees seemed to be nesting.
I am hoping that they move on at the end of summer as Adam suggests!
John
 

Adam

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woodshavings":3tzej5ye said:
Hi Neil,
The bees seem to have quitened down with very few in the workshop and at present, are not causing me a problem. I built a small extension on the outside of the workshop to house my chip/dust collector (Axminster ADE1100), it was the foundation of this that the bees seemed to be nesting.
I am hoping that they move on at the end of summer as Adam suggests!
John
Honeybees won't move on, only Bumblebees, or wasps. It's normally bumblebees that prefer to nest in holes underground.

Adam
 

woodshavings

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Hello Adam, thanks for the info !
I will have another go at photographing them for ident purposes - I hope they are bumble bees but I dont think so.
Cheers John
 

Adam

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If you want to get a good picture, mix about half a cup of suger with about a cup of hot water, let it cool slightly (it can be warm but not hot) and then pour a trail from the enterance, before you know it their will be loads out eating it up. Well fed bees are gentle as A) their stomachs are full so they can't bend round enough to sting you, and B) like us, they get relaxed after eating (quick snooze perhaps!?).
Still be careful though!

If you get stung, you should remove the sting as quickly as you can as the sting continues to pump poison in for some minutes.

Adam
 
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