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Bathroom ceiling.

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PhilTilson

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Don't know where you've been looking, but the Manrose MF100 at £63 is rated at 245m³ per hour, which equates to 8,650 cu ft per hour! (I take it that was a misprint - that your bathroom had an area of 688 sq ft? A bathroom of 34ft x 20ft would be quite some bathroom!)
 

artie

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(I take it that was a misprint - that your bathroom had an area of 688 sq ft? A bathroom of 34ft x 20ft would be quite some bathroom!)
Ah yes, just a brain fart. Should of course be cubic ft.
 

artie

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Don't know where you've been looking, but the Manrose MF100 at £63 is rated at 245m³ per hour, which equates to 8,650 cu ft per hour!
That's an inline, I was looking at ceiling fans with humidistat, but that would do nicely it would be a straight replacement for the present fan and I could probably add a humidistat.
 

Robin Whitfield

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The ones I have work just fine - they have what is effectively a "bunch of plastic drinking straws" as the heat exchanger.
Do you have a link to the ones that you're using? The only small (fan replacement) ones that I've seen have a single air passage with a material to transfer the heat as they cycle between intake and extraction.
Funny you should mention drinking straws though as I have a design in CAD for a small and cheap heat exchanger made out of straws designed to run on 12v inside a van conversion. I've also a 3D printer arriving today so maybe I'll finally get around to building the thing.
 

artie

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Taking advice from this thread, I upgraded the ceiling fan to a much stronger unit. connected it through a humidistat, obtained a Karcher window vacuum and a hygrometer.

The relative humidity of the bathroom when not in use was 85%

I then replaced the fan, engaged the humidistat and after showering we vacuum the condensation off the shower cubical glass and window.
We also take the towels to dry, when possible, outside.

I'm happy to report that rh today in the bathroom when not in use is 56%
 

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