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Barn to annex conversion

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Fitzroy

All the gear...
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What you could do is rebuild the structure, then buy a stone saw and re-saw 12mm slices from the top of the original stonework. Using these slices as mock stone wall on the outside and inside to give you the original look, take a photo and place them all in the same original position. Honestly, this is the sort of stupid idea that my brain comes up with and then won't let me forget about until I've as least tried it!
 

LBCarpentry

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After speaking with someone this morning I am now in the mindset of digging out the surrounding ground. as far a I can tell the real digging will be at the back and one side. Hhhhmm. Back to thinking...
 

LBCarpentry

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I really do have to disagree. There is a lot to be saved IMO. The wall are 500mm thick. If the walls are saved then all I need to do is fit new windows, a front and a roof. Basically all the carpentry bits - all easy peasy for me. I also want it to have a rustic look and feel. We are in the wye valley so it suits the surround and the house is an old cottage. The worst bit I will have to do is dig out the back which is and area of 4.2m x 1.8m x 1m deep. Hardly unachievable by hand (I won't get a digger up there)
 

LBCarpentry

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What you could do is rebuild the structure, then buy a stone saw and re-saw 12mm slices from the top of the original stonework. Using these slices as mock stone wall on the outside and inside to give you the original look, take a photo and place them all in the same original position. Honestly, this is the sort of stupid idea that my brain comes up with and then won't let me forget about until I've as least tried it!
I do agree with this also - This would be the long route. Although I wouldn't bother cladding the inside with stone, probably just timber tongue and groove for a nordic feel
 

LBCarpentry

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On that note - can anyone point me in the direction of where to get structurally insulated board from? you know, SIP boards.
 

Adam W.

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I really do have to disagree. There is a lot to be saved IMO. The wall are 500mm thick. If the walls are saved then all I need to do is fit new windows, a front and a roof. Basically all the carpentry bits - all easy peasy for me. I also want it to have a rustic look and feel. We are in the wye valley so it suits the surround and the house is an old cottage. The worst bit I will have to do is dig out the back which is and area of 4.2m x 1.8m x 1m deep. Hardly unachievable by hand (I won't get a digger up there)
Can you not just tank it and add some lost space to the front with an oak frame?
 

Jacob

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Re plastic membrane tanking. We found some here when renovations started. It was fixed to stone walls in 1.5m width sheets horizontally - lapping the next sheet up. Unfortunately they'd lapped them the wrong way so that condensation on the back of a higher sheet would drip out on to the face of the sheet below - effectively a way of collecting water and bringing it in to the building instead of keeping it out.
Tw ats!
If you do excavate around he back you need a widish gap say 1metre to allow wall to dry out in between weather systems. A problem you are likely find is that part of the wall was built against the bank and is just un-coursed rubble which was dropped into the gap between the coursed inside face, with the bank keeping the wall up
 
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sawdustandwax

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you are likely find is that part of the wall was built against the bank and is just un-coursed rubble which was dropped into the gap between the coursed inside face and the bank.
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which is why the original back wall is standing vertical and the floor inside of the barn won't be swimming in water after heavy rain. It will need replicating if dig out otherwise in time that banking will move. If you're going dig ideally speak with someone familiar with pore water pressure and slope stability, there's a lot mass behind that structure.
 
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