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Mickfb

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Spent more of my hard earned money today. I bought a Record BS12 bandsaw today. Must say I am impressed with the build quality for the money. I have had to do some fettling but it seems to cut okay. I changed the blade that come with it for one I bought from the shop that I got the saw from. Shall have to look at the Tufsaw Web sites for some blades.
Mick.
 

Bluekingfisher

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Installing a good blade on a BS is important. There are additional methods to enhance the blade further.

Make sure to clean all the gunk off with a solvent and a rag and make sure the brazing weld is smooth, a small file or sandpaper will ensure there is no or little in the way of "clunk" each time the weld passes through the guides.

Rounding the back edges of the blade is also important and will assist when cutting curves and make for easier feed rates, Stick some sandpaper onto a paddle or stick and burnish the back edges of the blade. You will have to run the blade on the machine for this operation so be careful, hence the reason for the stick to keep your hand well clear of the blade.

I hope all goes well with it.

David
 

Grahamshed

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Bluekingfisher":3ei979nm said:
Rounding the back edges of the blade is also important and will assist when cutting curves and make for easier feed rates, Stick some sandpaper onto a paddle or stick and burnish the back edges of the blade. You will have to run the blade on the machine for this operation so be careful, hence the reason for the stick to keep your hand well clear of the blade.

David
Not come across this before ( only just got my first bandsaw ) Is it standard practice ? does everyone do this ?
 

Harbo

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It's featured in a few books and videos I've seen - I use an old oilstone.

Rod
 

Eric The Viking

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Grahamshed":1iu3a8a4 said:
Bluekingfisher":1iu3a8a4 said:
Rounding the back edges of the blade is also important and will assist when cutting curves and make for easier feed rates...
Not come across this before ( only just got my first bandsaw ) Is it standard practice ? does everyone do this ?
I do.

You get a much cleaner cut with curves, the saw runs quieter (I think, anyway), and it's one less sharp thing to worry about (other side is quite enough!). I use an oilstone too, or sometimes a diamond plate.

E.
 

Grahamshed

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So be it. :)
When my new blades arrive from Tuffsaws I will give it a go. I have an old ( very old ) oilstone hiding away in the back of a drawer somewhere.
 

Steve Maskery

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It's particularly helpful when folding blades. The back edge can be like a knife, and smoothing it off means there is less chance of cutting your hands. And that's in addition to the benefits outlined above, re cutting curves and clearance.
 

Harbo

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Talking of folding blades - most of the time I have no problems but doing one the other day I gave up on it!
No matter how many times I tried it wouldn't fold and I had folded two others before it with no problems?

Rod
 

Grahamshed

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I can fold them but I cannot get them as small as they were when purchased. That always feels like one fold to many :)
 

Harbo

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I do a two handed version of the 2nd method but his methods look much easier?
Thanks

Rod
 

Jacob

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Grahamshed":1xpnafgv said:
Bluekingfisher":1xpnafgv said:
Make sure to clean all the gunk off with a solvent and a rag and make sure the brazing weld is smooth, a small file or sandpaper will ensure there is no or little in the way of "clunk" each time the weld passes through the guides.

Rounding the back edges of the blade is also important and will assist when cutting curves and make for easier feed rates, Stick some sandpaper onto a paddle or stick and burnish the back edges of the blade. You will have to run the blade on the machine for this operation so be careful, hence the reason for the stick to keep your hand well clear of the blade.

David
Not come across this before ( only just got my first bandsaw ) Is it standard practice ? does everyone do this ?
News to me too, but I've only be using mine for 35 years. The gunk comes off with the sawdust. If you do get welds which clunk don't buy blades from them again.
 

Eric The Viking

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Jacob, sometimes you remind me of the (many) plumbers who put PTFE tape on compression joints. It's even taught on plumbing courses!

"I've been doing it that way for 30 years, and it's never done me any harm," he said, as he deftly steered the canoe round the corner of the basement corridor...
 

Jacob

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Eric The Viking":1gca7mgw said:
Jacob, sometimes you remind me of the (many) plumbers who put PTFE tape on compression joints. It's even taught on plumbing courses!

"I've been doing it that way for 30 years, and it's never done me any harm," he said, as he deftly steered the canoe round the corner of the basement corridor...
Really? I'm slightly mystified. I see no point in rounding off the back of a blade and anyway it'll rapidly get flattened again by pressure against the back guide thing whatever it's called. Looks like a clever solution to an imaginary problem - not uncommon in woodwork circles - as epitomised by the honing jig :lol: :lol:
PTFE well it does come in handy as a last resort - I always keep a roll in my canoe. Actually it has a very practical non-emergency use too - I had to fit some PRVs and to get the dial to point outwards and be visible PTFE was the only way to set the joint.
 
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