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BANDSAW HELP !!!

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rubberheed

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SO just bought first bandsaw cheap from aldi ,however it says nothing about where blade should sit at the moment it rides infront of wheels and is all squint any help would be just that and cheers :? :?
 

Quickben

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Open both doors and slacken until the lade moves freely. Seat the blade on the wheels more or less in the middle of the rubber tyre. Tighten the blade up a little until it won't slide freely on the rubber anymore. Spin the wheels just with your hands a few rotations at the same time as using the knob to adjust the tilt of the top wheel. You're aiming for the serrations of the blade to be in the very centre of the wheel. Once you have achieved that, tighten the blade up until it is quite hard to deflect the blade with your hand using a moderate amount of force. Check blade position again by turn the wheels. If it stays put, you should be good to go.

Edit: Make sure you have the plug disconnected while you do this.
 

petermillard

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Just a quick heads-up, but I’m getting more than a few comments from people about this year’s Aldi bandsaw not being all that great in the quality control dept. A few people have had problems with the blade staying on the bottom wheel, so if that happens to you I’d chuck it back to Aldi for replacement, rather than driving yourself crazy trying to make it work, wondering what you’re doing wrong.
 

MJOriginals

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Hi there

Ref your question about a drill press in wanted can’t reply there but for help you need to let people know the sort of work you want to do, I do scroll saw stuff so tend to use a tiny drill press a lot of the time if your doing that sort of thing let me know I’m not far from you in polmont by Falkirk
Martyn
 

powertools

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If you have got the blade on and it stays on then I think it is just an issue with the tracking that is easy to fix by adjusting the top wheel. Don't forget to move all the guides away from the blade until is is running correctly and then readjust them to suit.
Don't get overly worried with the position of the blade on the wheels just get it into a position that it stays on and is at 90 deg to the table.
 

Alexam

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rubberheed, perhaps a bit late but some of this rundown may help with any problems that may occur.

BANDSAW TUNING - UNPLUGED
BEFORE TUNING - ensure that the bandsaw is set up on a level plane and bolted, or clamped down to prevent movement. If this is a modern or used machine, ensure that it is cleaned completely and that all moving parts are free and not blocked or stiffened by a build up of sawdust etc.
Check that the condition of both upper and lower wheel tyres and that both are in good order. Should a tyre need replacement, then replace the pair and not just one tyre.
CO-PLANER - this is a term meaning that with the blade attached at normal tension and with no contact by the guides or thrust bearing on the blade, both wheels are in line with a straight edge when stationary or turned by hand. If wheels are not in line, adjustments can be made by inserting a washer or shim behind the lower wheel if required to bring it into line.
In reality, wheels are more likely not to be in co-planer, as manufacturers often set up their machinery to run efficiently and allow for a slight offset to allow for various width blades. Co-planer is not an essential point as correct tuning will show and if your bandsaw wheels are not in line, you should not treat this as so desperately important.
When tuning your machine, a major factor is the top wheel adjustment that will allow the tilting of the top wheel so that the blade can position/seat itself in the correct place on the tyre.
TIRE - BLADE POSITION. One of the most important factors of tuning is getting this right. The adjustment for tilting the top wheel will move the blade towards the front or the back of the tyre. If guides and trust bearings are near the blade during initial tuning, you can damage the blade teeth.
Turning the wheels by hand helps, but once the motor has started, the blade position cn change, so be aware not to close in the guides and bearings until after the blade seating has been carried out.
BLADES - Blade tension varies with different width blades. Adjust the tension until the blade can be moved to the side by gently pressing your finger on it whilst stationary. Movement should be about 1/16" - 1/8".
Some bandsaws will have a guide or guage for tension settings of different width blades, but these are only an approximate 'guide' and cannot be relied upon for complete accuracy.
GUIDES & THRUST BEARINGS - Often upper and lower guides and thrust bearings are fitted, although there are other devices for maintaining the blade position, whilst allowing the blade to move more freely than with guides and thrust bearings.
However, you should check the condition of the guides and thrust bearings above and below the table. They should all be clean and able to move as required if touched by the blade when running or if turned the wheels by hand.
Some guided have blocks of various composition, or bearing guides either side of the blade and depending on condition, may need replacing. Consider the composition of the blocks, or bearings, as other types may be available and may improve the overall tuning of the bandsaw.
Guides should be set just short of touching the blade when it is moving. Manually turning the wheels whenever an adjustment is made is an essential part of tuning your bandsaw.
Similarly with the upper and lower thrust bearing, at the back of the blade, these should be set so that they do not rotate when the blade moves, unless under pressure from cutting.
TURNING ON - CONNECTING POWER - After making the above adjustments, switch on very briefly and switch off again, Check to see that the blade is not hitting the guides when running, before operating the machine at full stretch.
AFTER INITIAL BLADE TUNING - Once the above has been checked, it is time to check that the cut of timber is square. Test this by making a light, shallow cut on a block of wood, then turning the wood over 180 degrees and check that the blade fits the first cut accurately. If it does not, then the table is not square to the blade and needs adjustment. Use an engineer's square to check alignment of the blade in vertical and horizontal planes.
SAW TABLE - Ensure that this is clean and can be moved easily when required. Make sure that the blade does not make contact with any part of the table or insert when running. If a fence is fitted, ensure that it moves freely and is secure when in use and check this with the engineers square.
CHANGING CUT HEIGHT AND BLADES - Each time the height level for cutting thin or thicker stock takes place, or the blade is changed, the guides and bearings will need to be checked.
If a wide or narrow blade has been set up correctly and then a change in blade size will require the guide and bearing settings to be changed. Start the tuning process again if changing blades.
 

Alexam

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I wonder if any of the replies you received were of help?

It's always nice to know when a member has managed to sort out a problem, but in a few times, the member asking the question never replies, so others have no idea if you are progressing with your problem.
 

thomashenry

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I got the Aldi bandsaw. I was cutting thin strips fomr 2inch oak no problem with it. I thought I'd try a 'better' blade for rippng and got a tuffsaws one recommended for ripping, but it doesn't cut anywhere near as well as the stock blade - it jams, wanders, etc. Swapped back the to the stock blade and it works much better.
 

Steve Maskery

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Every time you change the blade it will need setting up from scratch. No two blades are the same. It's not difficult, but the right things have to be done in the right order. Tuffsaw blades are the best, so if yours is giving disappointing results, it's the setup.
 

thomashenry

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Steve Maskery":vzl9mvub said:
Every time you change the blade it will need setting up from scratch. No two blades are the same. It's not difficult, but the right things have to be done in the right order. Tuffsaw blades are the best, so if yours is giving disappointing results, it's the setup.
It must be too wide for the saw or something? I've spent ages on the setup a few times, and I'm always able to get the stock blade set up quickly.
 

thomashenry

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Steve Maskery":1rhgktx7 said:
So how wide is the original blade and how wide is your Tuffsaws blade?
The stock blade is 1/4", the tuffsaws one I got (after enquiring on the site) is 3/8".
 

Steve Maskery

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I would expect even a tiny machine to be able to tension 3/8, but it may well be at its limit. The wider the blade the more steel there is and so the harder it is to tension the blade. The strength of the frame itself is the limiting factor.
 

RickG

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Don't forget the thickness of the blade will also make a difference. If the Aldi blade is a couple of thou thinner, then that too will make it easier to tension.
 
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