Bandsaw help needed!

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Hi I've not long retired and I'm just in the process of setting up my long awaited workshop/haven. I am a novice woodworker with a little experience in DIY woodwork making projects at home which include cabinets, wardrobes, doors and a window. I have a 20 year old Scheppach Bassato 3 vario bandsaw which has been in storage for 19 years (long story)! I've replaced the rubber tyres with new, replaced the drive belt, and set up according to the Snodgress method, it has a new 5/8" x 3tpi blade, but struggling to resaw 4" Teak 1 1/2" thick can anyone give me some suggestions as to why the motor almost stalls whilst slowly, very slowly cutting? The Teak is very old 40yrs plus reclaimed science lab worktops! Am i doing anything wrong or is the saw too under powered? thanks in anticipation
 

Ttrees

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Hard to answer this when folks mention something along the lines of ...
I've followed the Snodgrass method, as it doesn't cover much but is a well presented
guide on the very basics of running a similarly sized machine to yours.

A new 3TPI blade should cut that, so long as the set isn't damaged.
How does the saw run, without vibration, or much / any strange noises when running,
what about when coasting to a stop, hand tracking, turning the wheel with no blade installed, same with lower wheel and belt.
Can you set all of your guides close and not have contact with the blade?
If really eager to get the best out of the machine, I'd suggest seeking for loose things
like wheel bearings, getting the machine co planar and making sure both wheels are aligned the same, (grizzly have a wheel alignment video online using a beam/level checking east-west) and that the drive belt lines up with the wheel hub,
rather than the impression one might get to use the guidepost (if non-adjustable)
Both tires have the dust track in the same location.


Those things will suck power and compress blade set if off by a lot, which gets expensive.

Don't think I've ever saw a teak science room bench, but have seen plenty of iroko
ones.
Are you cutting to a line freehand?, I've not seen real evidence of a machine that size using the fence cutting anything noteworthy, well at a bearable pace, but some boxmakers are patient and manage, but I'll bet they go through a few blades.

If you're using a fence then a short one might be the answer, should it be moving about like in this Manor wood video, which could also be partly the cause
 

deema

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I think the saw has around a 0.5KW motor, not very big, but for a bandsaw should cut the stuff. A new blade, setup correctly should cut it adequately. I’m not familiar with the saw, only played a little with one for a fellow member of this forum.
Check everything moves freely with the blade off, check the blade teeth are pointing down towards the table. I think there is a cone clutch / gear in them that can cause problems. Take the belt off the motor and turn both the motor by hand and what it drives.
If you can’t resolve it, give me a shout, I’m only up the road from you, I can have a look at it, we can cut up your stuff on my saws where we can see how your doing it. We do charge a packet of decent choccy biccies thought! 😂
 
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Peri

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When you've been setting up the blade, I've found (from experience) that if steel bearings touch the tips of the teeth (ie, you've let the blade get pushed back too far because the rear bearing wasn't set correctly, or in my case, tightened enough :rolleyes: ), you might as well throw it away and fit a new one. It'll struggle to cut and it won't cut straight.
 

Peter Sefton

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Have you tried cutting Oak or another timber of the same thickness with a new blade, Teak has a high silica content and this may have killed your blade very quickly. I was also going to suggest making sure the blades teeth are pointing towards the table, a blade can be turned inside out making the teeth point the wrong way.

I talked to Snodgrass a couple of years ago, a very knowledgable guy but tends to demonstrate setting up very narrow blades for his fine curved work, quite different from your needs.

Hopefully you can get this resolved, if not one of my bandsaw video series might help you out, this one deals with bands saw setup and blades selection and problem solving.

Peter Sefton Ultimate Bandsaw Set Up and Maintenance DVD

Cheers

Peter
 

RobinBHM

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Hard to answer this when folks mention something along the lines of ...
I've followed the Snodgrass method, as it doesn't cover much but is a well presented
guide on the very basics of running a similarly sized machine to yours.

A new 3TPI blade should cut that, so long as the set isn't damaged.
How does the saw run, without vibration, or much / any strange noises when running,
what about when coasting to a stop, hand tracking, turning the wheel with no blade installed, same with lower wheel and belt.
Can you set all of your guides close and not have contact with the blade?
If really eager to get the best out of the machine, I'd suggest seeking for loose things
like wheel bearings, getting the machine co planar and making sure both wheels are aligned the same, (grizzly have a wheel alignment video online using a beam/level checking east-west) and that the drive belt lines up with the wheel hub,
rather than the impression one might get to use the guidepost (if non-adjustable)
Both tires have the dust track in the same location.


Those things will suck power and compress blade set if off by a lot, which gets expensive.

Don't think I've ever saw a teak science room bench, but have seen plenty of iroko
ones.
Are you cutting to a line freehand?, I've not seen real evidence of a machine that size using the fence cutting anything noteworthy, well at a bearable pace, but some boxmakers are patient and manage, but I'll bet they go through a few blades.

If you're using a fence then a short one might be the answer, should it be moving about like in this Manor wood video, which could also be partly the cause


I worked with iroko for making joinery for over 20 years. Deeping Iroko is a complete no no. Its a timber renowned for tension - I’ve had boards explode just ripping them.

I have deeped down teak, it can be very mild working.
 

Myfordman

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It is just possible that if the motor has two capacitors instead of just one, that the run capacitor is faulty which would give poor running torque from the motor. You should not be able to slow the motor down in normal use.
teak is a tough first test. Try soft wood move onto to oak say to confirm you have not knackered the blade.
 

Jacob

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Are you re-sawing through the 4"? I think your blade and motor power may not be up to it
 
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I think the saw has around a 0.5KW motor, not very big, but for a bandsaw should cut the stuff. A new blade, setup correctly should cut it adequately. I’m not familiar with the saw, only played a little with one for a fellow member of this forum.
Check everything moves freely with the blade off, check the blade teeth are pointing down towards the table. I think there is a cone clutch / gear in them that can cause problems. Take the belt off the motor and turn both the motor by hand and what it drives.
If you can’t resolve it, give me a shout, I’m only up the road from you, I can have a look at it, we can cut up your stuff on my saws where we can see how your doing it. We do charge a packet of decent choccy biccies thought! 😂
A full packet! OMG you are bit over my price range:love:! Thanks very very much for the reply, I will have to do a bit more tinkering and see if I can fathom out what's going wrong, I don't have much experience of bandsaws. Thanks again Paul
 
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It is just possible that if the motor has two capacitors instead of just one, that the run capacitor is faulty which would give poor running torque from the motor. You should not be able to slow the motor down in normal use.
teak is a tough first test. Try soft wood move onto to oak say to confirm you have not knackered the blade.
Thanks I think its only got one capacitor, the instruction manual is about as useful as a chocolate fireguard! Will try some different woods and a bit more tinkering. thanks again Paul
 
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Have you tried cutting Oak or another timber of the same thickness with a new blade, Teak has a high silica content and this may have killed your blade very quickly. I was also going to suggest making sure the blades teeth are pointing towards the table, a blade can be turned inside out making the teeth point the wrong way.

I talked to Snodgrass a couple of years ago, a very knowledgable guy but tends to demonstrate setting up very narrow blades for his fine curved work, quite different from your needs.

Hopefully you can get this resolved, if not one of my bandsaw video series might help you out, this one deals with bands saw setup and blades selection and problem solving.

Peter Sefton Ultimate Bandsaw Set Up and Maintenance DVD

Cheers

Peter
Thanks Peter I will try some other timbers and get a new blade and see how I get on. Are there any brands of blades you would recomend? Thanks again Paul
 

Jones

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The basato 3 does have a wheel low down at the back to vary the speed. This seems to work by tensioning the drive belt. Is the drive belt slipping or the motor stalling when the blade slows ?
 

Peter Sefton

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@grumpyoldchippy I usually get my blades from Ian at Tuff Saws, he is very knowledgeable but I have also used Beverstock without ant issues.



Cheers
Peter
 

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