Bandsaw advice - Axi JBS160 (Delta 14" clone)

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M_Chavez

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Hi All,

Following some advice from this forum, I have recently purchased the biggest saw I could comfortably fit into my current workshop, which happened to be a 14" axminster JBS160 saw that appears to be a clone of Delta 14" or Grizzly G0555 and I would be grateful for some tips about upgrades/aftermarket accessories.

I mainly intend to use the saw for building plywood jigs, scroll cutting of guitar and mandolin/violin necks & soundboards and some minor resawing (well under the 6" capacity under the guides). It would be good if I can also use the saw for precise cuts for pre-shaping the blanks.
I see that there are 6" riser kits widely available for the Delta clones, and I wouldn't mind having the extra resawing capacity, even though I don't have any immediate use for the extra 6", but I suspect that adding the height will make the frame more flexible and have a negative impact on accuracy? I appreciate that 3/4HP motor will mean a very slow feed rate, which is something I can live with as I won't be resawing large boards more than once or twice a year.
I haven't bought any blades yet, but their length will depend on the riser block, so I would appreciate any advice on whether to get one or not.

Also, from what I have read about bandsaws, I should upgrade the guides to a 3-roller system for improved accuracy - has anyone had any experience with aftermarket guides? I see that carter guides receive good reviews, but a new set of guides would cost me more than the saw itself. The kit sold by axi seems to have the rear roller positioned on its side, which is not ideal?

Any advice about this bandsaw is greatly appreciated!
 

Alexam

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Welcome to the forum and to the world of bandsaws.
Dont know that particular model, but in general terms, you need to make sure it is tuned up when you have the blades ....... ideally from Tuffsaw as they are the best.

The following info may help you :-

GET THE BEST TUNING FROM A BANDSAW 'Alex Snodgrass of Carter Industries has an excellent video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU on a tune up method that works well.
Blades can run and cut without any guides whatsoever (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SHG3R2mEMM) as long as the machine is tuned correctly. This is how the blade should be running BEFORE the guides are brough into play on your machine, so that they can 'bump back' the blade should it wander, so please dont get guides near the blade before you know it is running clear and staying in the same place.
CHECKING BLADE TENSION - Flutter test Video's -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chyo9chuwJs and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8zZuDosSy0
Tuning a bandsaw is only that and nothing else. If you really want to get the very best use of your bandsaw on an ongoing basis, then the Steve Maskery DVD's will show you far more and they are a real investment that you should own. http://www.workshopessentials.com/shop/ '.
BUY BEST BLADES FROM ..... http://www.tuffsaws.co.uk/

Whenever you have put a blade on a bandsaw, ask yourself the following questions:-
....... are you managing to get the blade running freely and central on the top wheel ( without guides or rear bearing near the blade ) with the gullet of the teeth in the centre of the top wheel ? The exception would be with wider blades, as 1/2" and wider may not sit 'centred' on the top wheel).
That's the first priority before closing in guides and thrust bearings. The blade will not be in the centre of the lower wheel as the manufacturer allows the top wheel to be adjusted and tilt to allow tuning.
Is the blade running vertical 90° to the table alignment, front and back as well as side to side?
Once the guides and bearings have been brought to the correct position, (not touching when the blade runs freely) is the blade remaining where it should be when run under power and switched on and off checking several times ?

Are you sure that the tension is correct, or as near as it can be. Each blade could be different, even if it is the same depth, so needs to be checked whenever changing blades.

If all these things are correct, then you should get a true cut unless you are trying to cut the wood too fast and it's filling the teeth with sawdust and pushing the blade out of line and see if teeth are damaged in any way.

Finally, if you have used the blade before, make sure the teeth are clean, as sawdust will stick in the teeth gullet. Cleaning with a wire brush will result in a far better cut before starting a new job, but certainly on a regular basis.

Other members will soon be on to advise you on upgrading guides, but I hope it all goes well and you will soon be operating your latest purchase
Malcolm
 

Alexam

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......additionally, I would suggest that you see how the bandsaw performs before considering changing the guides. In general, guides are set just 'off' the saw blade so that it can be 'bumped' back should it move away from it's true line. Getting that true line is what the 'tuning' is all about. You may find that the present guides are perfectly good. You wouldn't think of changing the tyres on a used car just so they balance, so don't change the guides unless they prove to be a problem.
Malcolm
 

M_Chavez

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Thank you for your advice.
I did not realise that resawing can be done without the guides - in this case I don't think I need the riser block, especially considering the 3/4hp motor.

The current guides have plastic blocks instead of bearings and the blocks are worn off. I've read that the blocks can be replaced with homemade wooden blocks (say, ebony or rosewood) that would even perform better than plastic?
 

dickm

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For wooden guides, you need lignum vitae, which is effectively self-lubricating. I used them on a Kity saw that preceded my Startrite and they were fine. You say you are in "Scotland" - it's a big place! If you are anywhere near Aberdeen pm me as I have some bits of lignum lying around.
 

M_Chavez

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Hi Dick,

I am near Edinburgh, so a bit far from you. I remember reading that ebony, rosewood, maple will also work if microwaved in oil (?), but cannot find the link to that webpage.
Are there any tricks to cutting these blocks, or shall I just replicate the dimensions of the original plastic ones?
 

sunnybob

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Wood bearing blocks can be made out of any type, its a question of how long they last. Lignum vitae, almost forever, pine, no where near so long. But if you have it handy and you are happy to cut it to shape regularly, you can save some money.

My local woodyard has a bandsaw with 30" wheels and he just uses a solid block of redwood with a slot cut in it. Works fine.
 

SVB

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I had this saw and also purchased the riser block kit. A really nice kit with the block and also in the kit longer securing bolt, longer upper blade guide carrying bar and 2 x blade safety channels. Really easy to fit, just a case of removing blade, undoing big bolt and put in block which is dowelled, fit new bolt and ancillary bits and your done.

In terms of accuracy I didn't find it made much difference. To be fair, most work I did was turning blanks etc so not looking for super accuracy anyway but old / new blade made much more difference than this kit.

I bought it for two main reasons - 1) when doing turning blanks from log the rounded park of the log needs more clearance even when cutting thinner section hence more height under guides w/o more power really needed. 2) to cut lids off boxes etc. Again, more height needed without too much power.

S
 

M_Chavez

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Thanks for the advice.

I've decided to burn through a few blades before I get the riser. Just out of interest, which kit did you buy (there seems to be a lot of them from various manufacturers).
 

M_Chavez

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A quick question about the electrics - is it common for NVR switches to buzz when power is supplied to the machine but the machine is not running? Once the machine is running, the buzzing disappears.

A replacement switch is only about £16 in case the buzzing indicates a fault, so will be easy to replace.
 

sunnybob

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Chavez, its common for the chinese factory to wire the switch backwards. This is exactly what I found on my new pillar drill. remove the switch, and swap the pair of wires over. Keep blue and brown in the same relationship, just put top to bottom and bottom to top.
 

SVB

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M_Chavez":3nnt35q1 said:
Thanks for the advice.

I've decided to burn through a few blades before I get the riser. Just out of interest, which kit did you buy (there seems to be a lot of them from various manufacturers).

I bought the kit made by jet.
 

M_Chavez

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Sunnybob, thank you for saving me £12.

I've checked the wiring diagram on the back of the switch and it was, indeed, wired backwards.
 

M_Chavez

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Gents,

Are there any reasonably-priced urethane bandsaw tyre suppliers in the UK?

As I am going through the saw set-up, I thought I'd swap the old tyres for new ones.

Thanks.
 

sunnybob

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M_Chavez":ymuqojzf said:
Sunnybob, thank you for saving me £12.

I've checked the wiring diagram on the back of the switch and it was, indeed, wired backwards.

Obviously our machines were made in the same factory by the same illiterate silly person.

3 years ago i bought a belt / disc sander that started up as soon as the wall switch was turned on, and only stopped when the "start" button was pressed. You wouldnt believe a switch could be wired in so many wrong ways would you?

But count yourself lucky at £12. i went into my local (very large) tool shop and saw an NVR switch on the shelf. thought it wouldnt hurt to have a spare, and asked the price...... 75 euros.
Its still there.
I dont need no stinkin spare.
 
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