Band saw - Scheppach BASA3 vs Scheppach Basato 3V (vs Scheppach BASA 3.0)

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I.Q.

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Hi all,

I'm looking to buy a bandsaw, and came a cross several interesting threads mentioning - amongst others - Scheppach, on this forum.

I'm a bit confused about the differences between a Scheppach BASA3 vs Scheppach Basato 3V (and I saw even a mentioning of Scheppach BASA 3.0, supposedly being different from a Scheppach BASA3..).

Does anyone have clarifying information on this?

Thanks :)

I.Q.
 

Gordon Tarling

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I'm not an expert by any means, but I do know that the BASA3 is the latest model and is a different colour scheme from the previous models. I also believe that the earlier models were manufactured in Austria or Germany, whilst the newer ones are now made in the far East. I had a Basato 3 for many years and was very happy with the quality and reliability. Others here may know more than I!
 

Droogs

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Basata is indeed the older model of the band saw. The range was revised about 4 years ago with the Basa now made in the far east
 

Stevebod

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..I wanted one of these, and Screwfix did them at a good price...came to order one and they had sold out and have been unable to find one since so I ended up with an alternative?
 

I.Q.

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Thank you for the replies.

Does anyone know if the quality is still the same, between the older model made in Europe and the newer model made in the far East?

The price on their website is €599, is that about the same as the previous Basato 3 model? (Price change might be an indication of quality change).
 

Stevebod

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Record BS300....had to wait a few weeks for it due to supply issues caused by Brexit / Covid / Suez? But finally got one from Yandles. Although I note the prices have now gone up since I got mine...
 

I.Q.

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Although I note the prices have now gone up since I got mine...
I heard someone mention recent price increases for the Scheppach BASA3, as well. I wonder why that is..I mean, there are no chips in there, which (i.e. the shortage thereof), as I understand, is one of the reasons why e.g. less cars are produced and prices are going up...

What did you pay for the Record BS300?
 

I.Q.

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One of the suppliers that I contacted told me that the only difference between the model Basato 3 and the model BASA3 is that the former was made in Europe and the latter in China...no quality differences (but then again, he would say that, wouldn't he? Being a supplier...).

(I wonder what the price used to be for a Basato 3..one would expect it to be higher than the made in China BASA3 version (also when the same building quality is assumed), because of lower wages in China).

Anyway, I, too, am running into 'out of stock'-issues for the Scheppach BASA3-suppliers that I looked up...
 

Bojam

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I heard someone mention recent price increases for the Scheppach BASA3, as well. I wonder why that is..I mean, there are no chips in there, which (i.e. the shortage thereof), as I understand, is one of the reasons why e.g. less cars are produced and prices are going up...

Higher cost of raw materials (e.g. iron, steel, etc.), rising wages in China, factory closures due to Covid, substantial increases in the cost of global shipping....
 

I.Q.

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Higher cost of raw materials (e.g. iron, steel, etc.), rising wages in China, factory closures due to Covid, substantial increases in the cost of global shipping....
Good points, that makes sense.
 

Ttrees

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Six hundred quid is awhopping lotta dough for a machine like that,
You should be looking for somthing up to date, as near all other manufacturers have moved on to cast iron wheels, likely beefier tensioning systems and not half as much pot metal components, in the race for the cheapest machine with most features possible.

Have you a height restriction?
A compact 20" machine would have the same footprint.
EB 315.JPG

A 300mm machine on a awkward base above, vs a 20"/500mm compact far Eastern machine
Checking for coplanar .jpg


I suggest looking for used for the money you're looking to spend, 600 should get you a nice one.

A wee saw like that means you can't really make much use of a rip fence, and have to use a point fence and follow the line.

If you happen to come across some three phase machinery, it can be got for a third of the cost
Half for used, and half again for 3 phase.
Can run these if you see 240v (low voltage configuration)
from a household plug, anything up to 3hp will be no bother, as you can adjust to suit your supply should it be weak like mine.
Some 3 phase stuff cannot be run from 240v so you must see the motor name plate to see 220/240 volts to run it from a hundred quid VFD


20" is bang on the sweet spot, and a bit more sought after...
Here's a 24" which gets much larger beyond 20" and cheaper.
Got for 500 euros, and hundred quid VFD/inverter meets your budget
Bit large for some, wouldn't want a smaller one now though.

Seek a 20" machine I suggest, something around 200kg's should be sound
should you do anything like ripping or resawing anything more than stock for a wee box.

SAM_0939.jpg


Anything but to watch another washing machine repair video.

All the best
 
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I.Q.

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Six hundred quid is awhopping lotta dough for a machine like that,
You should be looking for somthing up to date, as near all other manufacturers have moved on to cast iron wheels, likely beefier tensioning systems and not half as much pot metal components, in the race for the cheapest machine with most features possible.

Have you a height restriction?
A compact 20" machine would have the same footprint.

Hello Ttrees,

No height restrictions (and I have a 230V system).

I have been looking for 2nd hand options and found several, including 3 phase band saws, although none close by (usually a several hours' one way drive away). However, I have no idea what I am looking at, most of the times. Brands that are unfamiliar to me, unclear specs, not necessarily all that much information on the original selling price (for me to know if the second hand price is reasonable), as I just mentioned: not much options in the vicinity, etc...

This makes the second hand market difficult for me, which is why I was looking for a new one, even though I'd rather buy second hand.
 

Ttrees

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Hello again
Call me a snob or whatever, but I think a lot of these strange alloy parts should be done away with on most bits of machinery.
I experienced this with the green saw above, and once was enough.
Imagine if the wheels decided to fail!

I would try and steer towards cast iron bits and bobs, you still might end up with the guides made of cheese, but that's not the most important part of the machine.
Presumably you might take a peek in "the other place" and seen Steve's newly fixed part on his bandsaw, and it failing again, and then getting made again from proper mild steel and it is the best part of the machine now.

If you'd only posted this a fortnight ago, I would have suggested Mock's post on hammer bandsaw for 500 near you. It's gone now, but take a look at what you can get for the cash.
There was another Jet machine here for the same money, likely gone too.

Both machines have cast iron wheels, which is about the most important thing on a bandsaw.
Everything else is gravy (on a modern machine) and can likely be sortable,
but not many would bother if the wheels were to break.
But guessing like anyone, you don't want to be working on the machine if you can help it.
Depending on what you plan on cutting, that might require a hefty blade and therefore would be strenuous on a smaller machine.

Take the tension screw for instance, a better system (on modern made machines anyway)
will have the tension handle under the top wheel, as it will be a heavier thread.
Plenty of folks having to replace threadbar on the green one above.

And just incase you believe the manufacturers statements about max blade width,
note that that is nonsense and misleading.
"But I've seen it with my own eyes, on youtube, I'll go get the video to show you" one might say....

Look at the video again, take note of the soundtrack which a small bandsaw will very likely have!
Why am I saying this?, is because the soundtrack is there to hide the cunning editing going on,
which one might not notice if looking at the machine as a whole using every opportunity to try and get a better idea, (along with whatever amount of tabs with bandsaws open to distract further)

Ask yourself why they won't show you a full cut, start to finish, on any bandsaw in twice that price range.
Ask yourself why they don't use a surfaced face and edge bit of timber to demonstrate with,
these are all sneaky as you would see a lot if both those things were included.

I'll tell you although you've likely guessed already, unless you're making excuses
Marketing is clever, often Mr Trustworthy seems like a likable character.
They, wouldn't have chosen him if he were not.
;)
So with a more cynical approach...
Note the fence is useless on these smaller machines, well it might not actually be the fence being useless, not that it matters.
It's because the machine can't handle a wider blade, (even though within the machines "specs")
This means you have to freehand the cut following a line.
If it were surfaced and tight everywhere along the fence, you would see a gap appearing when the timber walks away from the fence, due to drift if it were surfaced already.

Surfaced timber shows up the error, just incase one might think that were the opposite case.
i.e don't presume...well they don't have the timber surfaced as a planer might be a bit much for some folk to buy.
Or think..this guy is doing a real test, if it were in best case scenario everything would be tailored to favour the machine.

Don't make excuses, and for the money you have, should you be patient you will get a good machine.
listening to a bandsaw ripping something decent or resawing should not be so unpleasant
that would require whoever you're watching to do any editing of the cut.

So along with the fence being not needed on a 300mm wheeled machine
(unless you're a model maker)
The next thing you would notice is the screaming guides, which are gonna need be changed often.
A 3/4" blade will have enough "beam tension" not to give in and ride constantly against the
thrust guide.

A bigger saw should be able to tension a 3/4" blade honestly
Manufacturers would state the blade thickness (gauge) if they stood behind these statements
.
Those two machines that were for sale would just about have got there, definitely the smallest I would go, maybe not enough saw for some who have to resaw longer stock, and not just a box lid.

There's no difference in going up to a 20" saw in size, as who uses the back of the saw anyway?
Unless you're in a micro workshop and need to stow it away, it doesn't matter.
The footprint grows after the 20" size, as in..
say you've got the spine (column) against a wall, in a rectangular garage, the column of the saw is what grows and you can loose about 10" between that and the table.

So depending on you're space, that might make the difference between a Far Eastern compact 20"
(the table will be small)
or getting something more premium (Italian, or Italianish) with likely a bigger table, so might have to go a size down on those machines to fit.

I can dig up a thread and add it in a bit, concerning size.

Or can dig up a thread about cheaper 3 phase machines, should you be on a budget,
or should you have only a 13a plug, then three phase machines,
(ones which can be run on 240v that is) makes sense.
That would be evident on the motor nameplate 240v
You would need a hundred quid VFD for the job, but opens up a whole world of bargains and options compared to what you might be looking at.

All the best
Tom
 
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